Posts Tagged ‘crime’

A Pyrrhic Victory on Ashbury: This Bicycle Chain Worked and Yet It Didn’t Work

Wednesday, November 15th, 2017

This ride is mostly still here, but I can understand why it was abandoned by its owner:

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How to Tell You’re in a “Good” Neighborhood in Frisco: Are the Stripped Bike Frames You See Chained or Unchained?

Friday, October 20th, 2017

You see, ’cause in good nabes, ppl just donate unused frames to the street, a La Raza, a la gente, you dig? It’s a donation.

Good Frisco, in this case The Richmond:

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Regular Frisco, in this case, The Twitterloin:

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Keep on Truckin’, Gentle Readers…

THE FUTURE IS NOW: New “CITIZEN” App, fka “VIGILANTE”(!), Hits Frisco – Real Time Crime Reports on Your Smartphone

Friday, September 29th, 2017

FKA being, of course, Formerly Known As.

Anyway, this app is now operational and available in San Francisco.

Lets check it:

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Well, this certainly could be true late night at a 24/7 McD’s:

“MAN BRANDISHING KNIFE IN McDONALD’S”

So it seems to be working, FBOW.

Maybe in the future, it’ll let us know about nearby red balls, or brown:

Know Better Your Richmond District Bike Thieves – Caught in the Act, Left Tools Behind – A Car Jack Hack

Saturday, September 23rd, 2017

I’ll tell you back in the day, bicycle thieves aspired to take your whole bike, so they’d carry around Volvo car jacks the better to pry open your old-school Kyptonite U-locks. Then U-locks got better and the parts market became bigger, so now we’re in the Era of Frankenbikes with people stealing, tearing down, and reassembling bike parts to make untraceable, “new” bikes for sale on the craigslist and at fucking Laney College.

So this recent theft attempt in our Richmond District is old school. Note how the thief has modified the jack for easier concealment:

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One supposes this crime was interrupted.

So now it’s time to break into another car to get another car jack to steal more bikes to sell for $60 each to buy more drugs, one assumes.

Consult this handy chart when considering alternative careers…

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Twin Peaks Update: How Things Look Since the Most Recent Murder and Before the Nighttime Road Shutdown

Thursday, September 21st, 2017

Well, here’s your background – just keep reading down.

Photographer Ed French was killed in July 2017.

And here’s the latest:

SF Leaders Consider Proposal to Close Twin Peaks at Nighttime – By Terry McSweeney

(Of course, people would still go up atop Twin Peaks, but not with their cars, so that would certainly lower the SFPD / RPD workload.)

Impressions: Sunrise

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Here’s where one of the gates could go, on Twin Peaks Blvd. The 30 MPH speed limit seems a tad on the high side, but there you go:

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And here’s where the SFPD hangs out – you can pretty much see everybody who comes and goes from this spot:

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And here’s your greeting these days:

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Repeating endlessly:

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Speaking of which, here’s your broken auto glass report. I think I saw strong evidence of at least three break-ins last time I was up there:

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And:

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And:

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This is quite an improvement from earlier this summer, when all the broken glass really stood out on the newly laid macadam. So a rate of about 1000 break ins per year has dropped a lot, due to the heightened SFPD presence.

The popo aren’t up there now as much as in August 2017, but they’re still up there.

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As are your shutterbugs:

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All over, actually:

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Hey, did this woman sleep overnight on the less-trafficked, “car-free” side of this hill? IDK. She looked like a sleepyhead when I saw her one morning:

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So there you have it. I can understand why it’s easier for SFGov to just throw its hands up and say, “Screw it, let’s put up some gates on TPB.”

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As for whether that’s the best course of action, well, that’s up to you, Gentle Reader.

“Frequent Break-Ins” – Yes, Even In Marin – So Much Broken Glass in the Headlands That It’s Worth Signage

Wednesday, September 13th, 2017

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Shabby, Rusted Japantown – We’d All Have Been MUCH Better Off Without REDEVELOPMENT, Ch. CCLIX – Concrete And Clay And General Decay

Thursday, August 17th, 2017

Our J-Town is sort of a mess, not that I’m complaining, not that I’m calling for a “Fix-It Team” to drop everything and work on the solitary issue, that I, the monomaniacal activist, care about, no not at all. Let me explain.

All this Redevelopment stuff, all this concrete put in in the 1960’s is not up to snuff earthquake-wise – the garage, the east mall, the west mall, just entire blocks of Redevelopment. How on Earth can you bring things up to 2017-era minimal standards without spending a metric shit-ton of (non-existent) money? Well IDK.

And if even if you had the money to spend, how long would it take? How many years? What they’ve been talking about, for years/decades is an entire redo, a Re-Redevelopment, which would entail kicking out all the shops and restaurants, the bustling successful ones along with those just scraping by, and have them go … go where exactly? How about excessively wide Webster Street? I’m talking about the actual street itself – take out a couple lanes and the median and set up temporary shops, you know, Hayes Valley-style. That was a proposal.

And then, tens of millions of dollars (and who knows, nine figures?) could be poured in to seismic up.

(And to pay for this, there would have been a $100k tax on condos, so good luck with that – do you want to build up Japantown with slivers filled up with 500-1000 new condo units? Well, that’s what some people wanted.

Anyway, the moral of the story is for SFGov to not be so goddamned confident with future projects. Kind of like, “Don’t Just Do Something, Just Stand There.” And maybe we should instead spend our money on fixing up our Mistakes From The Past.

JMO.

And now, Japantown, a land of Wind and Ghosts:

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And car break-ins, of course, for tourists and locals alike. The expensive signs make everything better though, some feel:

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So you want to build a bridge, young Designers and Architects and Planners, but you don’t want to maintain it, that’s Someone Else’s Problem? You want to get it on to Make the Baby, but you don’t have the Staying Power to take care of the Baby. It sure as Hell looks that way:

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But newish banners – that’s the solution, so far:

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In the meantime, Concrete and Clay. 

And General Decay

FIN

Bad News for Amazon Whole Foods: “Court rules that ‘corrective education’ scheme is extortion – Herrera wins on two key issues in case”

Tuesday, August 15th, 2017

(So IDK. I thought that this exact kind of “corrective education” was “offered” to alleged shoplifters at the Whole Foodses of San Francisco, but I don’t know that this Corrective Education Company was the one involved.)

Anyway, I saw this scene at one of my rare visits to the Haight Street WF…

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…and then posted this and this.

And now here comes this, just released:

“Court rules that ‘corrective education’ scheme is extortion – ‘This is textbook extortion,’ court finds. Herrera wins on two key issues in case.

SAN FRANCISCO (Aug. 15, 2017) — City Attorney Dennis Herrera today hailed a key victory against Corrective Education Company after a court ruled that the private, profit-driven business was engaging in extortion and false imprisonment in its “diversion program” scheme.

“We should all be concerned about privatizing our justice system, especially when a business like Corrective Education Company uses the threat of criminal prosecution to intimidate and extort people,” Herrera said. “This ruling goes to the heart of their predatory business model, which is predicated on threats, deception and falsehoods. CEC is enriching itself on the backs of others, and many of the people they prey upon have limited means and are just barely getting by.”

Herrera sued the company in November 2015 over its “corrective education” scheme, asserting that the company’s practices amount to extortion and false imprisonment. The lawsuit was filed in San Francisco Superior Court on behalf of the People of the State of California.

Corrective Education Company contracts with major retailers, and when someone is suspected of shoplifting, they are taken to an isolated room and threatened with arrest and criminal prosecution unless they agree to watch a video created by CEC. In that video, CEC threatens to have suspects criminally prosecuted unless they sign a confession, agree to pay CEC up to $500, and undergo a six-hour “cognitive restructuring” and “behavioral modification” program. Faced with this Hobson’s “choice” between criminal prosecution and participating in CEC’s program, 90 percent of CEC’s victims — upwards of 13,000 Californians — “consent” to enroll in CEC’s program. After obtaining the forced confessions, CEC follows up with phone calls to the victims, again threatening them with criminal prosecution unless they pay CEC hundreds of dollars. CEC has also sent over 2,000 debt-collection letters in which it cloaks itself with prosecutorial authority in further efforts to enrich itself.

CEC operates in more than 25 states across the country.

In a ruling issued Monday afternoon, San Francisco Superior Court Judge Harold Kahn found Corrective Education Company engaged in extortion and false imprisonment.

“The undisputed facts … establish that CEC’s diversion program runs afoul of California’s extortion laws,” Judge Kahn wrote in his ruling granting summary adjudication on the two central issues in the case. “This is textbook extortion under California law, and has been so declared for at least 125 years.”

Numerous jurisdictions in California, including San Francisco and Los Angeles, offer legitimate, pretrial diversion programs that are overseen by district attorney’s offices. CEC operates entirely outside of the criminal justice system and without the approval of local prosecutors.

In his ruling, Kahn ruled that each iteration of CEC’s diversion program in California constitutes extortion and false imprisonment and that Herrera was entitled to an injunction halting the unlawful practices. CEC’s clients have included Walmart, Bloomingdale’s, Ralph’s, Abercrombie and Fitch, Burlington Coat Factory, and Kroger’s.

In the ruling, Kahn wrote: “By the quid pro quo of asking for money in exchange for forbearance in calling police, the retailer and CEC are acting in concert and are jointly liable for the extortionate conduct.”

The specifics of the injunction are still to be fleshed out, as is restitution and monetary civil penalties of up to $2,500 per violation.

The case is: People of the State of California v. Corrective Education Company, San Francisco Superior Court Case No. CGC-15-549094 filed Nov. 23, 2015.

Something New: Checkpoint Charlie Atop Twin Peaks – SFPD “Community Policing” of a Sort

Saturday, July 22nd, 2017

I’ve been up to Twin Peaks seven days out of the past eight – this is the first I’ve seen anything like this:

There was an SFPD presence up here even before the killing of last week, but it has stepped up quite a bit now.

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VIDEO: San Francisco police step up patrols on Twin Peaks after 71-year-old man murdered by thieves

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