Posts Tagged ‘csu’

Jerry Brown Graces San Francisco Thursday – Will Address the Commonwealth Club re: Prop 30 – Tickets Available

Wednesday, October 31st, 2012

All the deets:

Governor Jerry Brown

Thu, Nov 1 2012 – 12:00pm

Just Added: Governor Jerry Brown

The California Dream was built on a system of public schools and colleges that gave every Californian access to the education needed to get ahead. Gov. Jerry Brown is pushing hard for Prop. 30 because he says “we can’t keep cutting our schools and still keep the economy strong for the next generation.” In the last four years alone, California schools have been hit with $20 billion in cuts, over 30,000 fewer teachers and class sizes that are among the largest in the country. Brown says his Prop. 30 stops the cuts, stops the steep tuition hikes, and invests in our schools and colleges to prepare the next generation for the jobs of the future. To protect schools and invest in the future, Prop. 30. Prop. 30 asks California’s wealthiest to pay a little more so that the middle class doesn’t have to bear the burden; families making below $500,000 a year will pay no additional income taxes, and the sales tax will be established at a level lower than it was last year.

The governor says that Prop. 30 protects taxpayers with tough accountability measures: all new revenues are put into a dedicated account that Sacramento politicians can’t touch, and Prop. 30 requires annual audits posted online for everyone to see. Rejection of Prop. 30 would trigger $6 billion in state spending cuts on January 1, mostly from K-12 schools, which would be authorized to cut short their school year. Additionally, there would be a 5 percent tuition hike at the California State University system, 20 percent tuition hikes at the University of California, and a reduction in funding to community colleges.

Governor Brown has said,”There are a lot of people who I am confident will vote ‘yes’ if they get the facts.” Come hear the governor up close – and bring your questions.

Location: SF Club Office
Time: 11 a.m. check-in; noon program
Price: $25 standard, $15 members; Premium (seating in first rows) $45 standard,$30 members
Also Know: 
Attendees subject to search

PURCHASE TICKETS TO THIS EVENT ONLINE HERE, OR CALL OUR BOX OFFICE AT 415-597-6705.

Don’t Call It “Frisco,” But Happy FRISCO Day, Officially, Today, Friday, April 13th, 2012 at Area Collleges

Friday, April 13th, 2012

Today’s a big day for San Francisco High School students.

Check it:

“What is FRISCO Day?

FRISCO Day is an annual event held in spring to help all San Francisco Unified School District graduating seniors enroll in college, learn about financial literacy, develop support systems and build relationships with other students to help them complete the transition to college.

FRISCO Day (FRIday = Successful College Opportunities) started in April 2011 with more than 3,000 students participating at four locations: City College of San Francisco (CCSF) hosted all students who were CCSF bound and for students who were not yet sure of their educational plan, California State University (CSU) bound students went to San Francisco State’s campus to learn about the CSU system, University of California (UC) bound students visited UC San Francisco Mission Bay to learn about the UC system, and other two-and four-year public and private college bound students attended workshops delivered by the College Bound Network held at the Fort Mason Conference Center.

This year, students will go to CCSF (those students CCSF bound and for students who were not yet sure of their educational plan), University of California San Francisco Mission Bay, UCSF (those students who plan on going to a UC) and St. Mary’s Conference Center (for students who plan to attend a CSU or other 2 or 4 year colleges).

Why is it called FRISCO Day?

Click here for an article on the students who named FRISCO Day.”

Bon courage, seniors!

Hell Yes: Senator Leland Yee Goes After the SFMTA for Approving Nat Ford’s $400k “Golden Parachute”

Wednesday, June 15th, 2011

Here’s the news from Your Senator Leland Yee, the current front-runner in the race to become Your Next Mayor:

“SAN FRANCISCO – Senator Leland Yee (D-San Francisco) issued the following statement in response to the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency approving a $384,000 severance package for their outgoing executive director:

I am deeply disappointed that MTA would approve a nearly $400,000 golden parachute for an outgoing city executive. At a time when our budget is cutting critical social services for our kids and the most vulnerable in our city, we can ill-afford to be paying excessive payouts to administrators who are no longer working for the public. I have fought these exorbitant sweetheart deals at UC and CSU, and as mayor I will reform these practices.”

OK then.

WWMD with the SFMTA?

This was the one I was thinking of originally:

Laughing Squid

 

SFSU Changes Message From “Fund Public Higher Education” to “For The Public Good”

Wednesday, June 8th, 2011

[UPDATE: Upon Further Review, it turns out that I was wrong - these banners are made to go together, I now believe. Dude here put a banner in the wrong place and so then he had to remove it, the brown one, to put up the white one. Anyway, all I saw was him taking down the brown one so I misunderstood. Decide on a punishment for me and I'll carry it out forthwith...]

See?

Old banner on the left, new banner (Pro Bono Publico) on the right:

Click to expand

I guess the new wording tested better.

Anyway, this is the Message of the Day for Mission Street.

Sarah Palin’s Contract with CSU Stanislaus Revealed

Thursday, August 26th, 2010

Well, at long last, here it is – the much-discussed document has just been released: 

Contract (.pdf)

Judge: CSU Violated State Law in Palin Case. University violated the California Public Records Act, Must Pay CalAware Attorney Fees
 
SACRAMENTO – Stanislaus County Superior Court Judge Roger Beauchesne has ruled that California State University Stanislaus violated the California Public Records Act when they refused to disclose the contract that brought Sarah Palin to the campus in June.  The judge ordered CSU Stanislaus to release the speaking contract and also awarded payment of attorney fees to the prevailing party – the non-partisan, non-profit, open government organization Californians Aware (CalAware).
 
Despite being fully staffed by taxpayer-funded employees, the foundation and the university refused to disclose her compensation for the gala, which was not open to students but only well-heeled donors. 
 
After Senator Leland Yee (D-San Francisco) and CalAware were denied a public records request for the Palin contract and any correspondence regarding the visit, emails by administrators were uncovered and students found pages 4 through 9 of the Palin contract in the administration’s Dumpster.  The incomplete contract showed Palin would receive a hotel suite, first class airfare or a private Lear jet, pre-screened questions, and “bendable straws.”  It has since been reported that Palin received $75,000 plus expenses to speak.
 
“This is a great day for transparency and government accountability,” said Yee.  “However, it is also a sad day when a public institution so grossly violates state law and when their legal counsel is ignorant of the public records statute.  It is even worse, that university administrators attempted to blame students for their own negligence and misconduct.”
 
Judge Beauchesne issued the declaratory judgment sought by CalAware and concluded:
 
·        “the University failed to produce any public records called for by (CalAware’s) request until after the initiation and service of the instant lawsuit, which records established that the University did possess public records responsive to the request as of . . . April 6 . . .
 
·        “the University’s failures to follow the California Public Records Act, and to produce records when and as requested, whether deliberate, negligent or inadvertent, constitute violations of its obligations under the California Public Records Act, which contains no requirement that bad faith or a similar mens rea be proven in order to establish an actionable violation. . .
 
·        “the reasonable inference from the evidence produced is that the University, in its official capacity, has ‘used’ the contract between the Washington Speaker’s Bureau (with Ms. Palin and the CSU Foundation) in the conduct of the public’s business; therefore, said contract is also a public record and should have been produced to Petitioner.”
 
According to CalAware, the judge also issued a writ of mandate requiring the University to release the contract as well as any so far unreleased “documentation related to the use of University property, personnel, facilities or services provided in connection with the Gala for which the University sought or will seek reimbursement from the Foundation.” 
 
Finally, the judge ordered the university to pay CalAware the costs and attorney’s fees it incurred in bringing the lawsuit.
 
CalAware’s attorneys Kelly Aviles, Dennis Winston, and Terry Francke, issued the following joint statement:
 
“We are very pleased with the decision.  Judge Beauchesne, who had taken the matter under submission on August 2nd, carefully considered the arguments of all the parties.  Ultimately, he correctly sided with the public’s right to be informed about how its money is being spent. This ruling upholds California citizens’ right to maintain oversight and control of their government.  Public oversight is the only way that citizens are assured that public money is handled in an appropriate matter.  We are hopeful that this will prompt CSU to reevaluate the way in which it handles public records requests in the future.”
 
The judge correctly ruled that the Foundation itself is not currently subject to the California Public Records Act.  SB 330 authored by Senator Yee, which would subject campus auxiliary organizations and foundations to the public records law, is currently pending before the Governor.
 
“It is time for CSU to embrace commonsense transparency policies instead of spending taxpayer dollars fighting to keep the public in the dark,” said Yee.

Sarah Palin’s Fee for Upcoming CSU Stanislaus Revealed: $75,000, Plus Benefits

Tuesday, May 25th, 2010

Senator Leland Yee today draws attention to this bit from the Modesto Bee, which paid a visit to this anti-Palin site based in Europe.

The press release lays it out, the links have more detail.

(NB: “ca.” means “circa” – That’s how they roll in Euro-land.)

S.P. is broke no longer:

Click to expand

All the deets:

“Palin Fee to CSU Reported at Over $75,000 – More Than Double What She Charged Local GOP

As university violates state law, information continues to trickle out 

SACRAMENTO – The Modesto Bee is reporting that a Sarah Palin watchdog website has uncovered Palin’s fee to speak at California State University Stanislaus.  The Palingates blog reports that Palin will be paid up to $93,000 for her upcoming visit.  The amount would be more than double what Palin charged a local Republican Party in Lane County, Oregon, when she appeared at an event for $35,000, according to documents accessed on the Oregon Secretary of State website.

“If these figures are accurate, clearly CSU got a bad deal and Sarah Palin gouged California students,” said Senator Leland Yee (D-San Francisco).  “Celebrities should not be trying to line their own pockets at the expense of students, especially at a time when our public higher education system is in such dire straits.” 

According to sources, the university transferred two payments of $37,500 each to the Washington Speakers Bureau – the entity in which the university contracted for the Palin event.  In addition to the $75,000 speaking fee, the university is paying $18,000 for Palin to receive a hotel suite, first class airfare or a private Lear jet, and “bendable straws,” among other expenses.

“If Ms. Palin truly cared about our students, she should have waved her speaker’s fee or at least not overcharged,” said Yee.  “Every dollar that goes to Palin is another dollar not going to the students at Stanislaus, who have already seen their scholarships lost this year.  This is just the latest in a long series of bad decisions by CSU foundations and auxiliaries which demonstrate why we need greater transparency and accountability.”

via chdwckvnstrsslhm

“Last week, CSU Stanislaus released hundreds of documents that further show that university officials violated the California Public Records Act by not disclosing documents requested March 31 from Californians Aware and Senator Yee.

Among the documents uncovered is an email correspondence between CSU Chancellor Charles Reed and Bernie Swain, chairman of the Washington Speakers Bureau, that reveal documents were withheld simply to avoid “another round of newspaper stories.” 

The documents disclosed also show hundreds of correspondence between university officials and a partisan public relations firm on how to handle the public scrutiny.

The scandal has spurred Attorney General Jerry Brown to launch a formal investigation and Californians Aware to file a lawsuit in Superior Court.

On April 9, CSU student Ashli Briggs was informed that suspicious activity (specifically, document purging) was taking place within the administration building.  After seeing several administrators’ cars in the parking lot on the university’s scheduled furlough day, Alicia Lewis and other students found several public documents in a campus dumpster. 

Many of the public documents were shredded, presumably by university personnel.  Among the intact documents were financial statements, university spreadsheets, and staff assignments, as well as pages 4 through 9 of the Palin contract.

“USF Steps Up” Program Offers Half-Price Tuition to Visiting Students at Regional Campuses

Thursday, October 15th, 2009

Did you know that the University of San Francisco has satellite campuses in Cupertino, San Ramon, Santa Rosa, and Sacramento*? (I didn’t.) Anyway, the Jesuits are riding to the rescue for students “trapped” by the University of California and California State University, or something like that. Read all about it:

USF has stepped up to offer select courses to Californians at its regional campuses and we’ve lowered tuition more than 50% for these courses. The courses are offered through USF Steps Up, a new program to help non-USF students trapped by the devastating budget cuts at California’s public universities and give them the classes they need to graduate.

“The University of San Francisco is committed to California’s students and is swinging open its doors in Cupertino, San Ramon, Santa Rosa, and Sacramento to help students fulfill their General Education (GE) coursework. Classes start January 25th and federal student aid may be available for eligible students attending other area universities.

USF’s main campus as it appears when Sausalito has Fourth of July fireworks: 

IMG_9528-copy

“For over 150 years the University of San Francisco has excelled at educating California’s students. In these tough times, we hope to serve your educational needs as well. Come learn with our excellent faculty at one of our regional campuses.

What: Transferable General Education courses for spring semester 2010
When: January 25 – May 13, 2010
Where: Cupertino, San Ramon, Santa Rosa, and Sacramento
How: Attend USF as a visiting student
How much: Tuition is $560 a unit for classes in the USF Steps Up program

‘USF Steps Up’ to Offer Half Price Courses

Response to California’s Budget and Education Crisis

SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 15 — The University of San Francisco, a private Jesuit university, will offer a limited number of general education courses for half price at its regional campuses starting in January 2010. The courses are offered through USF Steps Up, a new program to help non-USF students trapped by the devastating budget cuts at California’s public universities and give them the classes they need to graduate.

Budget cuts at the University of California and California State University systems have resulted in layoffs, course reductions, and higher fees and left students scrambling for classes, many of which have been cancelled. “I’ve heard heartbreaking stories from my colleagues at state schools,” says Jennifer Turpin, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of San Francisco.  “Students are begging to get into classes, but they can’t graduate because they can’t get the classes they need. We realized we could help these students and California by offering these classes at our regional campuses, where USF already has a presence.”

More deets after the jump

* Sacramento, where you at Sacramento?

(more…)

Hey California Professors: Act to Lower Textbook Prices – It’s the Law!

Friday, August 15th, 2008

The California State Auditor has a new report about the prices of college textbooks. Unless you are a publisher, this report won’t come as good news. Check it:

“Over the past several years, the State has enacted two state laws to encourage faculty and campuses to mitigate the impact of textbook costs on students.

Assembly Bill 2477 (AB 2477) signed by the governor and effective January 1, 2005, requires CSU trustees and the board of governors of the community colleges, and encourages UC regents, to work with their respective academic senates to encourage faculty to consider the least costly practices in assigning textbooks.”

“Signed by the governor and effective January 1, 2008, Assembly Bill 1548 (AB 1548) also encourages faculty to consider cost in the adoption of textbooks.”

So, read up on Education Code Section 66406 and kissing cousin Education Code Section 66406.7 (the College Textbook Transparency Act). See all that stuff these laws require? Most parties concerned are ignoring these laws.

So hey, why not ask all your new professors at your UC, CSU or community college to see how they complied with these California textbook laws.

Shouldn’t your profs comply with CA law? Shouldn’t your profs be aware of CA law? Mmmmm….

img_1037-copy.jpg

Affordability of

College Textbooks:

Textbook Prices Have Risen Significantly in the

Last Four Years, but Some Strategies May Help to

Control These Costs for Students

August 2008 Report 2007-116