Posts Tagged ‘cyclists’

DUAL WIELDING: Your Jeans have TWO Rear Pockets, So You Should Carry TWO U-Locks on the Mean Streets of San Francisco

Thursday, April 6th, 2017

Thusly:

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If dual wielding works for Laura Croft…

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…it just might work for you.

This Type of Person is Why “Bay Area Bike Share” has a Very Low 1.9 Star Yelp Rating

Tuesday, March 28th, 2017

Now you’d think Frisco’s tourists would love love love an area taxpayer and feepayer-subsidized bicycle rental service with stations all over touristed areas like Market Street.

But some don’t because they get confused about the confusing pricing scheme, and they think wow, $9 for 24 hours? Man, we’re going to ride on out to Ocean Beach, whoo hoo!

But then it turns out that your credit card gets charged like low three-figures, because you didn’t check in your bikes every 30 minutes.

These bikes, coming back inbound from the West Side, where there are no BABS stations, are overdue and on the clock. They have exceeded their 15-minute combat radius:

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And then our tourists rage against BABS the only way they know how – on the Yelp.

Read and learn.

And this is still going on, in 2017.

The “solution” to this issue is that you get an automatic 50% refund just for asking.

Not much of a solution.

Out of gas already, trying to come up from the Great Highway through Golden Gate Park on a $1200 (if you lose it, or don’t check it back in entirely properly, but that’s another story) very heavy, electric motor-free, single-speed bike, about seven miles from where it was checked oot, eh?

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Oh well…

A Closer Look at the Brand-New “Safe Hit Posts” on Fell, Installed Either by the SFMTA or the SFMTrA, Still Can’t Tell

Wednesday, March 8th, 2017

Thought I’d find out about these freshly-installed plasticky street posts with a quickness, but I haven’t.

Here’s a closer look:

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You’d think the SFMTA would be crowing about something like this, if they done it:

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I’ll agree that these posts sure do “look official.”

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And here’s a glance at some now-official posts on the other side of Stanyan:

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They’re not aging well, oh well (but that was to be expected).

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I’l need to hear from an official SFMTA spokesmodel afore I know for sure that these are official…

Anti-Bicycling Sign on Rec and Park Property, Golden Gate Park

Monday, March 6th, 2017

Meesa thinks, “HOW WUDE!”

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IDK how official these signs are. (Suppose they were ginned up by the RPD, but I didn’t see the typical coding letters what most SFGOV signs have.)

Anyway, such riding is not allowed, per KRON 4’s world-famous Stanley Roberts

The RV Owners of SoMA Sure Seem to Have a Strong Interest in Bicycles, or Rather, Bicycle Parts

Friday, October 28th, 2016

Oh look, three in a row:

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One wonders what’s inside these RVs:

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Perhaps more bike parts?

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Perhaps from one of your bikes, Gentle Reader…

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Market Street: Where Parking Your Bike “For Just Five Minutes” Turns Into Five Days, and Then Maybe Five Weeks

Thursday, October 13th, 2016

That’s what everybody says, that they parked their bike for just five minutes and then when they came back it had been ripped off. Then the owner gives up and leaves the carcass there and then we have this, for day after day:

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A quarter century ago, there were fewer bike thieves in Frisco, and they’d endeavor to steal your whole bike, instead of just parts off of your bike. It was a better era.

Anywho, if you took this mess into a Local Bike Shop, they might tell you to make an appointment, I’m srsly. And then they’d tell you that you’d be better off buying a whole new bike, most likely.

On It Goes…

Mobile Bike Store, Under the Freeway, Frisco

Tuesday, October 11th, 2016

How many bike wheels does one person need?

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A Crazy New SFMTA Plan to Allow Bike Riders to Run Red Lights on Fell and Oak in the “Panhandle-Adjacent” Area

Tuesday, October 4th, 2016

Here it is: The “Fell and Oak Streets Panhandle-Adjacent Bikeway Feasibility Study”

The basic idea is to take out one of the four lanes of Fell and one of the four lanes of Oak along the Golden Gate Park Panhandle from the Baker Street DMV to Stanyan and turn them into dedicated bike lanes.

You don’t need to even look at the report to know that this idea is “feasible” – obviously, our SFMTA can do this if it wants to:

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But why does the SFMTA want to do this? This is not stated in the report.

As things stand now, you can ride your bike on the left side of the left lanes of Fell and Oak, or on the right sides of the right lanes of Fell and Oak, or in any part of any lane of Fell and Oak if you’re keeping up with traffic (but this is especially hard to do heading uphill on Fell), or on the “multi-use pathway” (what I and most people call the bike path) what winds through the Panhandle.

So, why not widen the bike path again, SFGov? It used to be 8 foot wide and now it’s 12 foot wide, so why not go for 16 foot wide? (Hey, why doesn’t our SFMTA simply take over Rec and Park? You know it wants to.)

My point is that it would also be “feasible” to somehow force RPD to widen the current bike path (and also the extremely bumpy, injury-inducing Panhandle jogging/walking path along Oak) independent of whatever the SFMTA wants to do to the streets.

Anyway, here’s the news – check out page 12 of 13. No bike rider (or what term should I use this year, “person with bikes?” Or “person with bike?” Or “person with a bike?”) is going to want to sit at a red light at a “minor street” when s/he could just use the bike trail the SFTMA figures, so why not just allow them to ride on Fell and Oak without having to worry about traffic lights at all? And the pedestrians? Well, you’ll see:

“Minor Street Intersections

The minor cross-streets in the project area from east to west are Lyon Street, Central Avenue, Ashbury Street, Clayton Street, Cole Street, and Shrader Street. Each is a consistent width of 38’-9” curb-to-curb with 15-foot wide sidewalks. All of these streets are discontinued [Fuck man. How much colledge do you need to start talking like this, just asking] at the park, each forming a pair of “T” intersections at Oak and Fell streets. The preferred control for the protected bike lane at these “T” intersections is to exclude it from the traffic signal, allowing bicyclists to proceed through the intersection without stopping unless a pedestrian is crossing the bikeway. Due to the relatively low pedestrian volumes at these intersections, it is expected that people using the protected bike lane [aka cyclists? aka bike riders?] would routinely violate the signal if required to stop during every pedestrian phase, creating unpredictability and likely conflict between users on foot and on bicycles. This treatment also recognizes that in order to attract many bicycle commuters, the new protected bike lanes would need to be time-competitive with the existing multi-use path that has the advantage of a single traffic control signal for the length of the Panhandle.

Excluding the protected bike lane from the traffic signal requires installing new pedestrian refuge islands in the shadow of the parking strip. The existing vehicle and pedestrian signal heads currently located within the park would also need to be relocated to new poles on the pedestrian refuge islands.

Implementing these changes would cost between $70,000 and $150,000 per intersection, and require the removal of approximately four parking spaces per intersection. Over the eleven minor-street “T” intersections along the Panhandle (excluding Fell Street/Shrader Street which which has been discussed separately), the total cost would be between $0.9 and $1.5 million dollars and approximately 48 parking spaces would be removed.

This design introduces a variety of benefits and compromises [“compromises!” Or maybe “costs,” as in a cost/benefit analysis?] for pedestrians crossing to and from the park at the minor intersections:

Pedestrians would be required to wait for gaps in bicycle traffic to cross the protected bike lane (which may present new challenges to people with low or no vision). Design treatments for the protected bike lanes (e.g., stencil messages, rumble strips, signs) should also be considered to clearly indicate the necessity of yielding to pedestrians to people on bicycles.”

New Wayfinding Signs Point Tourists on Bikes Off of Fell Street and On to the Panhandle Bike Path

Thursday, August 25th, 2016

You have many legal choices here, heading west at Baker – you can go on the bike path or you can go on the left side of the left lane of Fell, or you can go on the right side of the right lane of Fell, or (assuming you’re feeling especially vigorous and can keep up with Frisco’s version of a freeway even though it’s going uphill in this area) you can TAKE THE LANE:

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I’ve seen people doing all of these things, but 99% of the time, ppl take the bike path, as they should. And this especially applies to rental bike tourists, who generally don’t seem to be aware of the Golden Gate Park Panhandle Bicycle Path. Hence the wayfinding sign TO PANHANDLE PATH (even though it’s actually pointing exactly AT the path, oh well.

But these signs are kind of small, so I’ll still expect to see tourists on Fell Street oh well. And then on the return trip to their Union Square or Twitterloin hotels, I’ll still expect others to come east on the bike path and then go the wrong way on Fell for a couple blocks until they give up swimming upstream at Divisadero – that’s where the helmetless blond Euros with the 12 weeks of annual vacay generally seem to lose their religion to go the wrong way on, as stated, Frisco’s version of a freeway, oh well…

Four Choices Here on Market Street – How Would You Handle This Parked Bus?

Tuesday, August 9th, 2016

You can:

1. Go to the right, as shown, but sometimes there’s not enough room to do so.

2. Go to the left, but sometimes there’s not enough room to do so.

3. Go into the left lane, but there’s a huge wheel-swallowing gap in the road for the huge metal BART/MUNI subway grate, and if you fall down and get run over by a streetcar, a member of the SFPD just might say you weren’t riding “in the bike lane.”

4. Line up behind the stalled bus like you’re a car driver, for 10 to 150 seconds.

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I’ve done all four.

(I understand about where the BART entrances are placed, but I’d widen some lanes here in some places, at the expense of the (sorry, “urbanists”) overly wide sidewalks of Market Street…)

Choose or lose.