Posts Tagged ‘delivery’

Watermelon Delivery, Chinatown USA

Friday, February 7th, 2014

On Pine heading towards Grant Avenue:

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We had Webvan in 1999 and now in 2014 We have Amazon Fresh – What Will 2029 Bring Us?

Friday, January 17th, 2014

1999:

Man, WebVan was crazy – they didn’t last too long.

2014, on Fell Street:

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Of course, Webvan was dead for eight years, only to be resurrected by … Amazon.

That’s the update.

Happy shopping!

OMG, the BIGGEST 18-Wheeler Tractor Trailer Allowed in CA – On Masonic, by San Francisco Day School – CityTarget Truck

Monday, December 23rd, 2013

IMO, it’s more fun to not explain things, but here we go, let’s pay off that headline:

1. God damn, this trailer is freaking huge – I’ve never seen one bigger. This aint no 20-footer and it aint no 40 footer. It’s a 53-footer. It’s Harder Better Faster Stronger. It’s as big* an 18-wheeler tractor trailer as you’re ever going to see, Gentle Reader.

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2. Now here’s what pisses some people off about San Francisco Day School. These parents enter their kinder into the San Francisco SFUSD school busing program lottery. And, because they don’t already have an older kid already in a good public school AND because they don’t live a “low test score area” (like in parts of The Mission or near The Projects), they lose out in the lottery. So then they say, all right, well, we’ve lost the lottery, but we can simply pony up $27k(!) to put our four-year-old into a private school. But then they have to qualify by being interviewed. And then, sometimes, they get rejected. And then they get seriously pissed off. Anywho, Masonic Avenue / Boulevard is reason #1 why SFDS will never be a high status school (in comparison with the tonier outfits up in Specific Whites Pacific Heights.) Masonic is how the Jennie Zhus of this world get back and forth betwixt San Francisco Proper and the westside, The Avenues, the West Bay neighborhoods like The Richmond and The Sunset. Masonic, for better or worse, is a freeway substitute and it will always be that way and, for the worse, it’s the front door of SFDS. These days there’s a plan afoot to put in trees and a median that will slow down all the cars and the occasional MUNI bus, but that won’t really change things for SFDS. All the parents and nannies will still double park on neighboring streets, oh well. Look at the photo and there it is, the SFDS.

3. Oh man, the millionaire property owners of the lily-white “NOPNA” Northeast of Panhandle Homeowners Association DID NOT want to see those, those people shopping at a retail store up at Geary and Masonic again, oh no, but that’s what’s happening despite their best efforts. I myself didn’t object to the CityTarget, you know, but even I’m a little surprised to see such a big rig heading up Mervyn’s Heights with the Target targets on the side.

Just saying.

Of course, all of the above was implied by the simple photo and short headline…

*Unless you move to Texas, and even then…

**Who’s getting interviewed, really, the parents or the kid? IDK. I’ll tell you, I bet if Will Smith tried to get his kid into this joint, there’d be no problem, no problem at all. But if you don’t impress SFDS enough to get a green light, you’re money’s no good there.

OMG, It’s Here, AmazonFresh is Here – FREE 30-Day Trial for “Select” San Francisco Zip Codes, Hurray!

Thursday, December 12th, 2013

[UPDATE: Oh, after the first 30 days of free service, the cost is $299 per year, I'm told.]

Oh man, it’s fresh.*

(Remember WebVan? I do. My roommates would get the craziest things delivered for free. Like rental DVD’s from Blockbuster. And then they’d send another van to pick up the DVD after you watched it. Crazy times. The only things left after the bankruptcy were the vans themselves and some Aeron chairs. Anyway, turns out that Amazon bought the name a few years back. Funny that.)

Anyway, it’s all right here, babe.

I’m going to burn my Safeway card right now…

*”The song introduced a new meaning to the word “fresh,” meaning “good.

Official Chinese Propaganda 75% Off: CHINA DAILY Newspaper Used To Be Free – Then $1 – Now 25 Cents

Tuesday, November 5th, 2013

First it was free and then it cost $1 at newsstands.

But that didn’t work out, obliviously.

So this is the latest tack – a price reduction:

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Most of the paper’s editorial staff are still Chinese, whose English reports are ‘polished’ by a small group of expatriate editors employed on short-term contracts.”

Oh, I see.

Carry on then.

Market Street Has Its Challenges: Delivery Trucks, Mail Trucks Everywhere – Double-Parked UPS, FedEx, and More

Friday, October 18th, 2013

Thusly:

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Bus-Porn: MUNI 9X Bayshore Spotted on the Highways of Wyoming – New 8700-Series Delivery – Transit-Spotting

Friday, October 18th, 2013

New Flyer Industries keeps cranking them out and we keep buying them. See?

This brand-new MUNI #8706 is just like our 8600-series hybrid diesels, right?

Via SinGarTheGoat Reddit:

My buddy is on tour with his band driving through Wyoming, he just sent me this pic. What the fuck is a MUNI bus doing in bum-fuck Wyoming?!?”

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Somebody’s going to have to update Wiki…

My love is in league with the freeway
It’s passion will ride, as the cities fly by
And the tail-lights dissolve, in the coming of night
And the questions in thousands take flight
My love is the miles and the waiting
The eyes that just stare, and a glance at the clock
And the secret that burns, and the pain that won’t stop
And it’s fuel is the years
Leading me on
Leading me down the road
Driving me on, driving me down the road

OMG, It’s the FedEx EarthSmart All-Electric Delivery Van on Market Street! Or Should I Say _Marketing_ Street?

Wednesday, August 7th, 2013

This thing looks like it’s from the future:

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Does public relations work on you?

Prolly.

Does it work on me?

Nope.

OMG, EAT Club is Here! – “SF’s Best Eateries On One Bus” – Another “Innovative E-Commerce Service?”

Thursday, May 30th, 2013

The First Rule of EAT Club is DON’T TALK ABOUT EAT CLUB.

The Second Rule of EAT Club is DON’T TALK ABOUT EAT CLUB.

But I digress.

There I was in the Financh all set to “welcome” yet another a new corporate shuttle to the ‘hood, you know, with the two-inch main blade of my Victorinox Swiss Champ right into the sidewalls of the rear tires when I discovered that it’s actually some sort of food delivery bus.

Then I didn’t know what to do.

Jay Barmann of Grub Street has the deets on this Big New Thing.

As seen yesterday in the 94111:

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“EAT Club Eats up the Valley - Announces $5 Million Series A Funding Led by August Capital

SAN FRANCISCO–(BUSINESS WIRE)–EAT Club, a leading food tech company that brings delicious lunches to professionals, announced today that it has raised a $5 million Series A funding led by August Capital with participation from First Round Capital, Siemer Ventures, Great Oaks Venture Capital, Launch Capital, Tekton Ventures, Mark Vadon (Co-Founder of Blue Nile & Zulily) and angel investors. Howard Hartenbaum of August Capital joins Rob Hayes of First Round Capital on the Company’s Board of Directors. First Round Capital led the Company’s Seed Financing in 2011.

EAT Club is an innovative ecommerce service that presents an always-changing daily assortment of lunches to its members via its website and mobile services. Members who order lunch enjoy a freshly prepared restaurant meal, delivered to their office between 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., without the issues of a minimum order size or food not showing up on time. EAT Club merges technology with an exclusive network of quality restaurant partners to create a curated, convenient experience for members, while providing restaurants with a profitable new revenue stream and significant consumer exposure. EAT Club delivers to over 1,500 California Bay Area companies and powers corporate lunch programs and group meetings for customers like Chegg, Bloomreach, Gunderson Dettmer, and IMVU.

“This is an incredibly exciting time for EAT Club. We’ve built a product that our members love, have an amazing group of people, and that is translating into very fast growth. We’ve been experiencing consistent double-digit month-over-month growth,” said Frank Han, EAT Club’s CEO. “With this funding, we will more aggressively pursue our vision of making great food available and accessible to people everywhere. What we’ve done so far is just the beginning.”

Leading the financing round, August Capital Partner Howard Hartenbaum believes that EAT Club’s Internet-based logistics technology is tackling a growing lunch problem that affects more than 70 million professionals by helping them get a wide selection of healthy and tasty foods at work without needing to plan ahead. “EAT Club fuses technology to capitalize on untapped restaurant inventory and real-time member reviews and feedback to create a product that is simply awesome. Employees are no longer forced to eat a catered selection they didn’t want, now each employee can select their individual EAT Club choice each day.”

About EAT Club

EAT Club is a leading food tech company that makes lunch fun, exciting, delicious and super easy. EAT Club’s unique concept allows members to choose handpicked lunches that fit their lifestyles and receive their lunch by 12:30 p.m. Founded in 2010 by Kevin Yang and Rodrigo Santibanez as Stanford Graduate Students, EAT Club currently delivers lunches to more than 1,500 companies in the California Bay Area. For more information, visit www.myeatclub.com. EAT Club has received funding from August Capital, First Round Capital, Siemer Ventures, Great Oaks Venture Capital, Launch Capital, Tekton Ventures, Mark Vadon (Co-Founder of Blue Nile & Zulily) along with angel investors.

Contacts

SS|PR for EAT Club
Tony Keller, 312-759-0858
SVP
tkeller@sspr.com

Daily lunch at the office can be a hassle. It’s time-consuming, repetitive, and potentially unhealthy and expensive if you’re pressed for time. At the same time, there are all these great restaurants in the neighborhood, but driving there would take too much time.

Fortunately, EAT Club is here to make daily lunch delicious, convenient, and affordable. Just visit myeatclub.com, choose from a rotating set of featured restaurants and healthy daily options, and your food shows up by 12:30 like magic.

Join fellow office workers at over 2,000 other companies like Sony, Shutterfly, and Kaiser Permanente and discover affordable and reliable lunch delivery.

We created EAT Club to address a frustration we personally felt as busy office workers, that there were no convenient, delicious, and affordable lunch options available to us. At Kevin’s last job, the only quick options were the uninspired deli in the basement and the McDonalds down the street. More than once, he resorted to raiding the vending machine.

While there were good restaurants within driving distance, it was hard to get in a car for lunch without losing an hour out of the day. Kevin and his colleagues looked into lunch delivery a couple times, but found that the minimum orders and unreliable service made it too expensive and cumbersome for daily use.

It was based on this personal experience that we decided to combine a love of good affordable food, novel use of technology and data, and a commitment to consistent service to make lunch delivery an attractive option for all our fellow office workers out there.

You can order one lunch for yourself or a hundred lunches for your company. Sign up for free, order your first lunch and start believing.

Kevin and Rodrigo
EAT Club Founders

Frank Han, CEO

As CEO, Frank is helping EAT Club change how people eat lunch at work. Frank is a long-time eCommerce industry leader. Prior to joining EAT Club, Frank was CEO of Swoopo.com, the innovative inventor and leader of pay-per-bid auctions. He was founder and CEO of Glimpse.com, a fashion shopping portal that was sold to TheFind. Prior to that, he was Executive Vice President and General Manager of HSN.com, the online business of the Home Shopping Network, where he drove growth to over $350 million in annual revenue by embracing HSN’s multi-channel opportunity. In 1996, Frank cofounded eToys.com, the pioneering online retailer that grew from zero to over $200 million in revenue and IPO’ed in 1999. He served as COO and SVP of Product Development.

Frank earned his MBA from the Stanford Graduate School of Business and his BS from Yale University.

Kevin Yang, Co-Founder

Kevin is an experimental cooking enthusiast and low-key restaurant connoisseur. To support these hobbies, he has held odd jobs throughout the years, including stints in management consulting, venture capital, computational biology research, and classical Chinese translation. His qualifications to be a lunch delivery guy include an MBA from Stanford and a BA from Harvard.

Rodrigo Santibanez, Co-Founder

Rodrigo’s adventurous appetite has given him an extended food curriculum, ranging from traditional recipes to the most exotic dishes from around the world. He developed a crazy appetite for spicy food while growing up in southern Mexico. His background as a Finance Analyst taught him the most efficient methods of ordering food in late office hours, and his experience at a consumer goods company in Italy refined his taste for Neapolitan cuisine. Rodrigo studied his MBA at Stanford University, where he enjoyed the amusing results of mixing Asian, Indian and Latin American cuisines in the same student dormitory.

Press

Investors

  • First Round Capital
  • Lightspeed Venture Partners
  • Launch Capital
  • Siemer Ventures
  • Tekton Ventures
  • Brian Lee (founder of ShoeDazzle and LegalZoom)
  • Niren Hiro (AdMob)
  • Aki Sano (Founder of Cookpad)
  • Michael Kinsbergen (CEO of Nedstat, acquired by comScore)

Racist San Francisco Pizza Delivery Map Evolution – Western Addition, Twitterloin, and Potrero are No Go – Yet It’s Legal

Tuesday, April 30th, 2013

[GRUB STREET SF has an explanation from the owner. Plus there's good news for Dogpatch! Sort of. Before 7:30 PM, anyway.]

Remember back in the day, back  more than a half-decade when a joint like Amici’s East Coast Pizzeria could get away with a delivery map like this?

Check it, the Western A and the Potrero Hill PJs were carved out of the delivery areas and the gritty “Uptown” Tenderloin / Twitterloin / 6th Street / Flank area only enjoyed daytime delivery, thusly:

And then came this map, which is a little less racist:

And oh wait, this is the current map still.

(At least the southern part of Potrero Hill isn’t carved out so blatantly these days.)

One wonders what sassy District Five Supervisor London Breed or District Six Supervisor Jane I mean, I’m just saying Kim or feisty District Ten Supervisor Malia Cohen would think about these maps.

This pizza delivery driver safety issue was the talk of the town over at Eater SF and kissing cousin Curbed SF a half-decade back. Let’s review.

Taxi drivers can’t legally refuse to take you to certain areas of San Francisco due to their concerns over personal safety. Non, non, non. That’s a crime called failure to convey that can land a cabbie in the hoosegow. Why are pizza drivers treated differently?

Because in 1996, Supervisor Willie Kennedy gave us a law, (one that became national news), but then it got watered down such that a “reasonable good faith belief” that a driver would be in danger in a particular nabe is now enough to allow the brazen publication of redlined pizza maps.

And check it, flower and newspaper delivery people are off the hook as well.

Note also that there doesn’t seem to be any designated punishment for a violation anyway. Oh well.

To review, cabbies are on the hook, delivery people not.

NB: Dominoes appears to use a different map, or maybe none at all, as it seems they’ll delivery just about anywhere in our seven square.

The More You Know…

SEC. 3305.1. HOME DELIVERY SERVICES.

(a) It shall be unlawful for any person or business entity to refuse to provide home delivery services to any residential address within the City and County of San Francisco falling within that person’s or business entity’s normal service range. A person or business entity may not set its normal service range to exclude a neighborhood or location based upon the race, color, ancestry, national origin, place of birth, sex, age, religion, creed, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity, weight or height, of the residents of that neighborhood or location. Where a person or business entity regularly advertises home delivery services to the entire City and County, that person or business entity’s “normal service range” shall be defined by the geographic boundaries of the City and County.

(b) For purposes of this Section, “home delivery services” shall mean the delivery of merchandise to residential addresses, when such services are regularly advertised or provided by any person or business entity.

(c) Notwithstanding any other provision of this Section, it shall not be unlawful for a person or business entity to refuse to provide home delivery services to a residential address if (i) the occupants at that address have previously refused to pay in full for services provided to them by that person or business entity; or (ii) such refusal is necessary for the employer to comply with any applicable State or federal occupational safety and health requirements or existing union contract; or (iii) the person or business entity has a reasonable good faith belief that providing delivery services to that address would expose delivery personnel to an unreasonable risk of harm.

(Added by Ord. 217-96, App. 5/30/96; amended by Ord. 295-96, App. 7/17/96; Ord. 222-02, File No. 021462, App. 11/15/2002)