Posts Tagged ‘diablo canyon’

PG&E Talks About What It’s Like to Refuel Its Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant – An Informative Press Release

Thursday, March 28th, 2013

Here’s a map to get you situated and the release is below.

Some of the stuff in there was news to me…

“Diablo Canyon Unit 2 Safely Returns To Full Power After One Of Most Successful Refuelings In Plant History

Project Provided a Major Economic Boost to the San Luis Obispo Region

AVILA BEACH, Calif., March 28, 2013 — Unit 2 at Pacific Gas and Electric Company’s (PG&E) Diablo Canyon Power Plant is running at full power again following a planned maintenance and refueling outage that began Feb. 3.

The outage was among the most successful in Diablo Canyon’s history, given the depth and breadth of the work involved, the excellent employee safety performance, and its conclusion ahead of schedule. Unit 1 continued to reliably generate electricity throughout the Unit 2 outage.

“Diablo Canyon Power Plant plays a major role in helping PG&E deliver some of the nation’s cleanest electricity to its customers,” said PG&E Senior Vice President and Chief Nuclear Officer Ed Halpin. “The work performed during this and other planned outages supports our safe operation of the facility, and ensures a steady flow of affordable, reliable and carbon-free energy to more than three million Californians.”

About 30 projects were completed during the 48-day window, in addition to standard maintenance. Crews performed about 12,000 outage-related activities, involving about one million hours of inspections, maintenance and equipment upgrades.

Major project work included replacing a portion of the Unit 2 reactor fuel, upgrading a crane system that moves key plant components, and installing a new digital Process Control System (PCS). The PCS monitors and controls various plant systems. The Diablo Canyon team set an industry record by completing the upgrade, which involved thousands of electrical connections, in less than 50 days.

Halpin attributed the success of the outage in part to effective preparation and planning by plant personnel.

“Completing the outage in a safe and efficient manner and returning the unit to service ahead of schedule is a testament to the hard work and commitment of our dedicated employees and contractors–both before and during the outage,” Halpin said. “When considering the scope of work conducted, our team of professionals turned in a world-class performance.”

Each of Diablo Canyon’s two reactor units is refueled about every 18 months. During a planned outage, more than 1,000 trained supplemental workers from around the country are brought in to assist the plant’s nearly 1,500 employees.

Pismo Beach Chamber of Commerce Chief Executive Officer Peter Candela said these outages provide a major economic boost to the region as out-of-town contractors and their families lodge in hotels, rent homes and patronize local businesses while working at the plant.

“Planned outages at Diablo Canyon help our local businesses thrive,” Candela said. “During each outage, around $5 million is spent locally by visiting workers and their families. We always appreciate the time they spend in our community, and hope they enjoy their experiences visiting Pismo Beach and the region.”

Diablo Canyon Power Plant’s two units together produce approximately 2,300 net megawatts of electricity without greenhouse-gas emissions. That total represents about 10 percent of all electricity generated in California, enough energy to meet the needs of more than three million Northern and Central Californians.

Pacific Gas and Electric Company, a subsidiary of PG&E Corporation (NYSE:PCG), is one of the largest combined natural gas and electric utilities in the United States. Based in San Francisco, with 20,000 employees, the company delivers some of the nation’s cleanest energy to 15 million people in northern and central California. For more information, visit www.pge.com/about/newsroom/ or www.pgecurrents.com.

Click herefor more information on how planned outages at Diablo Canyon Power Plant provide economic benefits to the Central Coast.

SOURCE Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E)

Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E)

CONTACT: PG&E External Communications – (415) 973-5930

OMG, PG&E has a “Chief Nuclear Officer” for Real? Be Afraid, Be Very Afraid

Wednesday, February 22nd, 2012

Hey, remember what Mayor Ed Lee said on September 1, 2011, during the one-year anniversary of PG&E’s incompetance killing eight people in San Bruno:

 “They’re a great company that gets it.”

Uh, nope!

Via David Yu - click to expand

Anyway, that’s how they handle natural gas, let’s see how they handle nuclear energy.

Here’s the latest:

“PG&E Names Industry Veteran as Chief Nuclear Officer

Ed Halpin Will Oversee Operations at Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant

SAN FRANCISCO, Feb. 22, 2012 /PRNewswire/ — Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) today announced the appointment of Edward D. Halpin as its new Senior Vice President and Chief Nuclear Officer.  Halpin will be responsible for the continued safe, efficient, and reliable operations of Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant (DCPP) and the decommissioning of Humboldt Bay Power Plant. He will also serve as the utility’s lead contact with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Halpin is a veteran of the nuclear power industry, with almost 30 years of experience gained at STP Nuclear Operating Company (STP) in Bay City, Texas and with the U.S Navy’s nuclear submarine service.

“Ed Halpin is an exceptional industry leader who has amassed an impressive safety and performance record in leading nuclear operations,” said Chris Johns, President of Pacific Gas and Electric Company. “His drive for excellence will serve PG&E and its customers well as he takes on his responsibilities as our Chief Nuclear Officer.”

Halpin is assuming the role from John Conway, who in addition to overseeing nuclear generation at PG&E as the Chief Nuclear Officer, has been leading all energy procurement and hydro, fossil and renewables generation functions as Senior Vice President of Energy Supply. Halpin will be based full time at DCPP concentrating solely on leading the utility’s nuclear program. He will report to Conway when he joins the utility in early April.

Conway added, “Ed is a talented leader and will be a great asset to our team. He brings a wealth of experience to his new role and I am confident that under his leadership we will continue Diablo Canyon’s strong record of providing safe and reliable energy to our customers in Northern and Central California.”

Halpin comes to PG&E from his current position as the President, CEO, and Chief Nuclear Officer at STP.  He previously served in a variety of positions at the South Texas-based company, from Startup Engineer to Site Vice President.

“I’m excited about the opportunity to join an outstanding organization at PG&E,” said Halpin. “PG&E has a strong history of customer service and performance, and a great culture of collaboration. I look forward to joining the team and to the opportunities ahead.”

Halpin holds a Bachelor of Science degree from the U.S. Naval Academy and Master of Science degrees from Seton Hall University and Fielding Graduate University. He is also a graduate of the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations Senior Nuclear Plant Manager course. He served for five years in the U.S. Navy.

Pacific Gas and Electric Company, a subsidiary of PG&E Corporation (NYSE: PCG), is one of the largest combined natural gas and electric utilities in the United States. Based in San Francisco, with 20,000 employees, the company delivers some of the nation’s cleanest energy to 15 million people in Northern and Central California. For more information, visit http://www.pge.com/about/newsroom/ and www.pgecurrents.com.

SOURCE  Pacific Gas and Electric Company”

A Small Protest Against Nuclear Power at the CPUC: PG&E’s Diablo Canyon and Earthquakes, Lundberg vs. Lomborg

Friday, April 15th, 2011

This was the scene yesterday AM at the CPUC building near McAllister and Van Ness.

Now, Jan Lundberg thinks we should shut down our nuclear panner plants, especially the ones near fault lines.

Bjørn Lomborg disagrees.

And there you have it:

Click to expand