Posts Tagged ‘districts’

I Don’t Know, Supervisor Scott Wiener’s Plan to Rein-In NIMBYish Historic Districts Sounds All Right to Me

Thursday, December 8th, 2011

Here’s what showed up in the email, below.

Is this like preaching to the converted or something? I mean, why on Earth would we want more historic districts in San Francisco? Aren’t they, and their boosters, part of the problem?

Anyway, here’s the spiel, choose or lose:

“SPEAK UP NOW FOR PRESERVATION IN SAN FRANCISCO!

On Thursday, December 8, the Planning Commission will consider comprehensive revisions to Articles 10 and 11 of the Planning Code recommended by the Historic Preservation Commission, in addition to a series of controversial amendments introduced by Supervisor Scott Wiener.

Attend the Planning Commission hearing:

When: Thursday, December 8, 12:00 p.m. (Agenda Item #9)
Where: City Hall, Commission Chambers, Room 400
Why: To voice concern over Supervisor Wiener’s proposed amendments that would roll back protections for historic resources in San Francisco.

Email the Planning Commission: If you are unable to attend the hearing, please email the Commissioners (with a copy to Desiree Smith at dsmith@sfheritage.org):

Christina Olague c_olague@yahoo.com
Ron Miguel rm@well.com
Michael J. Antonini Wordweaver21@aol.com
Gwyneth Borden plangsf@gmail.com
Kathrin Moore mooreurban@aol.com
Hisashi Sugaya hs.commish@yahoo.com
Rodney Fong rodney@waxmuseum.com

KEY POINTS

OPPOSE Supervisor Wiener’s amendments that would impose unique procedural hurdles on the designation of historic districts:

 Although only 11 local historic districts have been created in 45 years, Supervisor Wiener would require 66% owner support before community groups can nominate a historic district.

 The intent of Proposition J was to update Articles 10 and 11 to reflect best practices nationwide; the 66% owner consent threshold is a relic of the original ordinance adopted in 1967 and is out of step with widely-recognized preservation practice today.

 Other procedural hoops proposed by Supervisor Wiener, including a mandatory written vote or survey of all property owners, would make the process more costly and time-consuming.

 No other zoning changes in San Francisco are subject to similar owner consent requirements; historic districts should be treated the same as other neighborhood planning initiatives. OPPOSE Supervisor Wiener’s amendment to make compliance with the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards optional:

 The proposed language would effectively eliminate any minimum standards for the treatment of historic buildings in San Francisco. OPPOSE Supervisor Wiener’s amendment to exempt large classes of projects from historic review altogether, including downtown housing development projects:

 The proposed language is a misguided attempt to exempt an entire class of projects from historic review, clearing the path for demolition, insensitive alterations and new construction regardless of the significance of the structure or the surrounding historic district.

For further backgroud and to read Heritage’s past comment letters, go to sfheritage.org”

Tonight at 6:00 PM at Fort Mason: Your Chance to Speak at the Citizens Redistricting Commission Public Input Hearing

Monday, June 27th, 2011

Well, here’s your chance:

Citizens Redistricting Commission Public Input Hearing
Monday, June 27, 2011
Fort Mason Center, Cowell Theater
Entrance at Marina Blvd. and Buchanan Street
San Francisco, CA 94123
6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.

View the Live Broadcast – 6PM to 9PM

And don’t worry, no matter how it goes, everybody in San Francisco will be represented by a state Senator at all times…

The 14 members of your Citizens Redistricting Commission. Seated, left to right: Connie Galambos Malloy and Michael Ward. Standing, left to right: Jodie Filkins-Webber, Gabino Aguirre, Vincent Barabba, Michelle DiGuilo, Maria Blanco, Peter Yao, Cynthia Dai, Lilbert “Gil” Ontai, Jeanne Raya, Angelo Ancheta, Stanley Forbes and M. Andre Parvenu:

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___________________________________________________________________

“The 14 member Independent California Citizens Redistricting Commission will hold a public input
meeting in San Francisco on June 27, 2011, from 6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. at the Fort Mason Center. The
Commission was created by California voters to draw state Congressional, Assembly, Senate and Board
of Equalization Districts.

“Public participation in drawing these districts is critical to ensuring that communities have the strongest
voice possible to express their preferences. When voters with similar interests are drawn into a district
together, their voices multiply giving them a greater opportunity to express their views, elect candidates
of their choice and hold their leaders accountable.”

Ever more deets, after the jump

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Your Independent California Citizens Redistricting Commission Wants to Hear From You on Saturday, May 21, 2011 in Oakland

Tuesday, April 26th, 2011

Your Citizens Redistricting Commission is avoiding San Francisco County (and Marin and San Mateo and Santa Clara, for some reason, for now, anyway) so you’ll have to hoof it over to Oaktown if you want to give them your 2 cents before they have the chance to turn California’s electoral districts upside-down.

And actually, they have a whole state tour going on these days. Deets below.

14 members of the Citizens Redistricting Commission. Seated, left to right: Connie Galambos Malloy and Michael Ward. Standing, left to right: Jodie Filkins-Webber, Gabino Aguirre, Vincent Barabba, Michelle DiGuilo, Maria Blanco, Peter Yao, Cynthia Dai, Lilbert “Gil” Ontai, Jeanne Raya, Angelo Ancheta, Stanley Forbes and M. Andre Parvenu:

Click to expand

First up is the meeting in Oakland and then the full sked, below:

Citizens Redistricting Commission – Public Input Hearing – Saturday, May 21, 2011

City Council Chambers – 1 Frank Ogawa Plaza – Oakland, CA 94612 – 2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

The 14 member Independent California Citizens Redistricting Commission will hold a public input meeting in Oakland on May 21, 2011, from 2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers.  The Commission was created by California voters to draw state Congressional, Assembly, Senate and Board of Equalization Districts.  Public participation in drawing these districts is critical to ensuring that communities have the strongest voice possible to express their preferences.  When voters with similar interests are drawn into a district together, their voices multiply giving them a greater opportunity to express their views, elect candidates of their choice and hold their leaders accountable.The Commission is taking testimony from local area residents before drawing its first round of draft maps which will be released in June.  Final district maps must be certified by the Commission and presented to the Secretary of State by August 15, 2011. Citizens wishing to provide testimony to the Commission can learn more about how to effectively present information by going to www.wedrawthelines.ca.gov .  To assist you in providing your presentation, we have developed a “Toolkit” which you will find on the home page under “Upcoming Events.”All public input hearings are ADA accessible.  Any person who wishes to request auxiliary aids or services, including translation, to participate in the hearing of the Commission, in accordance with State or Federal law, should contact Janeece Sargis at 1-866-356-5217 not later than five (5) business days before the noticed hearing date.”

Full Meetings/Hearings Schedule (April-August)

April Meetings/Hearings Schedule

May Meetings/Hearings Schedule

June Meetings/Hearings Schedule

July Meetings/Hearings Schedule

August Meetings/Hearings Schedule

Past Meetings

April Meetings/Hearings Schedule

March Meetings/Hearings

February Meetings/Hearings

The San Francisco Elections Commission Wants YOU to Serve on the Great 2011-2012 Redistricting Task Force

Monday, April 11th, 2011

Now I’ll tell you, all I know about electoral redistricting is on the state and Federal level. Like remember when Willie Brown cooked up a plan to have a Senate district go right down the middle of Castro Street back in the day as a kind of F to the U to any potential gay candidates (like Carole Migden) what might have opposed Willie Brown:

At a fundamental level, it’s a symbolic issue, and using Castro Street as a dividing line is really a slap in the face of the community,” said Paul Hogan, chair of the Alice B. Toklas LGBT Democratic Club.”

Good times.

Or this purple thing Down South, crafted so that San Luis Obispo-type cowboys wouldn’t be in the same district as beach-side hippie types. It’s as narrow as 150 yards wide at high tide, our 23rd Congressional is:

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Now don’t you want to get in on the fun? Well then answer the Call put out this AM by your City and County of San Francisco Elections Commission. Deets below.

Now I’ll tell you, I’d apply for this thing, you know, just to mess with peoples’ heads (by putting the houses of three sitting supes all in the same district, stuff like that) but it turns out that criterion #2 is “represent[ing] San Francisco’s diverse population.” And I’m the least diverse person you could possibly imagine so I’m DNQ’ed from the get-go.

But you, they’d love to have you.

All the deets:

THE ELECTIONS COMMISSION CALLS FOR APPLICATIONS FOR APPOINTMENT TO THE REDISTRICTING TASK FORCE

What is redistricting?

Every ten years, the Federal Government conducts a census to determine the number of individuals living in the United States. After the census is completed, the Charter requires the Director of Elections to determine whether the existing supervisorial districts meet the legal requirements established by federal, state and local law. If the existing supervisorial districts no longer comply with these legal requirements, the Charter requires the Board of Supervisors to convene an Elections Task Force to redraw the supervisorial district lines. The process of redrawing the supervisorial district lines is known as redistricting. The Director of Elections has not yet made this determination (as of March 28, 2011), but in the event that he finds that the districts must be redrawn and if the Board of Supervisors convenes a task force, the Elections Commission wants to find outstanding candidates as quickly as possible.

How Does Redistricting Work?

If convened, the Elections Task Force will consist of nine members. The Mayor, the Board of Supervisors and the Elections Commission each appoint three members. These nine individuals work with City staff and outside consultants to determine how the supervisorial district lines should be redrawn so that the districts comply with the legal requirements established in federal, state and local law. As part of this process, the Elections Task Force holds multiple community hearings to receive input from the people of San Francisco. Throughout this process and based on community input, the Elections Task Force will make several changes to the existing supervisorial district lines. The Elections Task Force must present a final plan outlining the new supervisorial district lines to the Board of Supervisors in April 2012.

What are the legal requirements for supervisorial districts?

The members of the Elections Task Force must consider federal, state and local legal requirements when redrawing supervisorial district lines. For more on these legal requirements, please see http://www.sfgov2.org/index.aspx?page=270

What are the criteria for appointment to the task force?

Each of the three appointing authorities – the Mayor, the Board of Supervisors, and the Elections Commission – probably have different criteria. By unanimous approval at the March 16, 2011, meeting of the Elections Commission, it has selected the following minimum criteria for its three appointments. Applicants must:

(1) Be registered to vote in San Francisco and have voted in San Francisco at least once since January 1, 2006;
(2) Represent San Francisco’s diverse population;
(3) Have not been paid by a political campaign since January 1, 2006;
(4) Not currently a direct-hire employee of an elected official of the City and County of San Francisco;
(5) Have general knowledge of San Francisco’s neighborhoods and geography;
(6) Have flexible schedule for attending meetings; and
(7) Not have a conflict of interest that is prohibited under conflict laws applicable to other City officers.

How can I apply to be appointed by the Elections Commission?

It goes on and on…

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