Posts Tagged ‘do it outdoors’

San Francisco Rolling Billboards Run Amok – But They All Have Expired Nevada License Plates, Why’s That?

Wednesday, January 26th, 2011

Learn all about San Francisco’s mobile billboards right here.

O.K. then. Now, this anti-abortion advertising truck from Nevada was illegally parked on Market Street back when a huge crowd of 16,000 or  so marched up the Embarcadero.

Of course, the SFPD or a meter maid could give this Do It Outdoors” a ticket but what good would that do?

Is this how Do It Outdoors does bidness, with unregistered Nevada plates?

Click to expand

Looks that way.

The Mobile Billboards of San Francisco – Are They Illegal or Not?

Tuesday, January 5th, 2010

Work with me here – mobile billboards, you know, those trucks that are basically giant rectangular ads, are banned in San Francisco under Section 680 of the Police Code and yet you can see them all over town.

What gives?

Click to expand:

Maybe San Francisco has given up enforcing this regulation? Let’s see what the New York Times had to say back ten years ago:

“Similar disputes are occurring in Boston and in San Francisco, which suspended enforcement of its ban on mobile billboards in June because of a lawsuit, said Nathan Ballard, a deputy city attorney there. But San Francisco recently revised its law to explain the rationale behind it (to cut traffic congestion, truck emissions and assaults on citizens’ aesthetic sensibilities). Unless the billboard company succeeds in persuading a judge to issue a preliminary injunction by Dec. 1, he said, San Francisco will resume enforcing its billboard ban.”

(Nate Ballard was a San Francisco deputy city attorney? Did not know that.) Anywho, it could be that constitutional concerns prevent San Francisco from doing anything about mobile billboards.

Oh well.

That’s just my guess – maybe you can find a loophole here. Enjoy:

SEC. 680. ADVERTISING VEHICLES PROHIBITED ON CITY STREETS.

(a) Findings and Purpose. The inherent primary purpose of commercial advertising vehicles is to display commercial advertising on public streets. By their nature, commercial advertising vehicles are intended to distract, and aim to capture and hold the attention of, members of the public on or adjoining public streets, including drivers, pedestrians, bicyclists, and others. Moreover, such vehicles display commercial advertising from a mobile platform, including while the vehicle is moving within the flow of traffic, potentially stopping, starting, or turning abruptly, accentuating the inherent tendency of such advertising to seize attention and to distract. Additionally, the use of motor vehicles to display commercial advertising creates exhaust emissions. For these reasons, the Board of Supervisors finds that commercial advertising vehicles create aesthetic blight and visual clutter and create potential and actual traffic and health and safety hazards. The purposes of this section are (1) to promote the public health, safety and welfare of motorists, pedestrians, bicyclists, and others using the City’s public streets and roadways and adjoining areas, by eliminating the aesthetic blight and visual clutter and traffic and safety hazards caused by the operation of commercial advertising vehicles on the City’s streets; (2) to reduce congestion on the City’s streets; (3) to reduce exhaust emissions, by eliminating as an emissions source a type of commercial advertising display whose use may require continuous or extensive operation of motor vehicle engines; (4) to protect public investment in and the character and dignity of the City’s streets; and (5) to aid in the attraction of tourists and other visitors who are so important to the economy of the City. This section is not intended to regulate any non-commercial speech, including non-commercial advertising or signage.

(b) Prohibition. No person may operate any commercial advertising vehicle in or on any public street in the City and County of San Francisco.

(c) Definitions. As used in this Section, the following terms shall have the following meanings:

(1) “City” means the City and County of San Francisco.

(2) “Commercial advertising vehicle” means a motor vehicle that is carrying, towing, or otherwise displaying any commercial advertising sign, unless the vehicle is used primarily to transport passengers or goods.

(3) “Commercial advertising sign” means a banner, placard, poster, card, picture, sign or display that does no more than propose a commercial transaction.

(d) Enforcement.

(1) The Police Department shall issue a written notice of violation concerning, and requiring the immediate correction of, any violation of this Section to the driver of any commercial advertising vehicle that is being driven or used in violation of this Section, as well as to the owner or other person responsible for the vehicle, if the identity of that owner or other person is known or readily ascertainable. If issued to the driver of a commercial advertising vehicle, the notice shall require the driver to inform the owner or other person responsible for the operation of the commercial advertising vehicle of the notice and of the violation to which it relates. Notice to the driver of a commercial advertising vehicle under this subsection shall be deemed notice to the owner or other person responsible for the operation of the vehicle.

(2) The City Attorney is authorized to enforce this Section by appropriate civil action. No such action shall be commenced against any person unless and until the Police Department has issued a notice of violation requiring correction to that person, as specified above, and that person has failed to comply with this Section and with that notice. In any civil action brought to enforce this Section, the City Attorney may pursue the remedies set forth in this Section for the violation of this Section that is subject of the notice, as well as for any subsequent violations of this Section that have occurred within one year after the issuance of the notice without regard to whether the Police Department issued subsequent notices concerning those subsequent violations.

(3) Violation of this Section shall constitute grounds for injunctive relief. In addition, any person who violates or refuses to comply with the provisions of this Section shall be liable for a civil penalty which shall be assessed and recovered in a civil action brought in the name of the People of the City and County of San Francisco in any court of competent jurisdiction. Each separate display of commercial advertising prohibited by this Section, and each day that a violation of this Section is committed or permitted to continue, shall constitute a separate violation. The amount of such civil penalty shall be $250 for the first violation, $350 for the second violation, and $500 for each subsequent violation of this Section. Any penalty assessed and recovered in an action brought pursuant to this paragraph shall be paid to the Treasurer of the City and County of San Francisco. The person against whom a penalty is assessed, or against whom an injunction is obtained, also shall be liable for the costs and attorney’s fees incurred by the City and County of San Francisco in bringing any civil action to enforce the provisions of this Section.

(4) Violation of this Section shall not constitute a criminal offense.

(5) In any action brought to enforce this Section, the City Attorney may also seek any remedies available under state or federal law.

(Added by Ord. 70-92, App. 3/4/92; amended by Ord. 234-00, File No. 001261, App. 10/13/00)

Just How Many Giant Advertising Trucks Are Circling Around SoMA These Days?

Tuesday, October 27th, 2009

You know, it used to be that you’d see these empty advertising trucks driving about town, you know like in the congested part of Fillmore in the Western Addition, but then they seemed to disappear from the Streets of San Francisco about a year ago.

But now, they are back, and with a vengeance. Is it possible to have four of these things on the same block in the SoMA? That’s the report I got. Here’s two recent sightings in one photo.

Fourth Street near Mission. Click to expand:

IMG_9477 copy

And leave us not forget this other truck, the one with Nevada plates (no, that doesn’t raise any issues at all!).

Is there no limit to these advertising trucks clogging Yerba Buena Gardens?

Even Las Vagas (Vegas, baby!) wants to regulate these things.

Sigh – the Do It Outdoors Advertising Trucks have returned to Market Street – Sigh

Thursday, October 15th, 2009

Aren’t we trying to keep traffic off of Market Street these days?

Well, nobody told that to the Do It Outdoors company cause they’re running around town again.

IMG_8330 copy

What the hell, Mel? WTF, Chuck?

Oh well…

Ridiculous “Do It Outdoors” Truck Now Parking Illegally in Golden Gate Park

Saturday, October 18th, 2008

Of course you’ve seen the likes of this rolling billboard before. And maybe you’ve even met purported Do It Outdoors National Event Manager and model Gosia in San Francisco.

What’s new is that one of their trucks has taken to parking in spaces reserved for tour bus loading in Golden Gate Park.

Perhaps we’ll add “rolling billboard only loading” to JFK Drive?

Only time will tell.

Just What Golden Gate Park Needs: Billboards!

Sunday, August 24th, 2008

Hey look what was parked on JFK Drive in Golden Gate Park, soon to become a National Park, during Opening Night of the 2008 Outside Lands music festival. That’s right, it’s our old friend, the Do It Outdoors MGD Beer rolling billboard.

Except this time, it wasn’t rolling. It was parked in the same place for what seemed to be hours, emergency blinkers clickety-clicking away.

From Wisconsin with love:

Which is worse:

1. A rolling billboard driving around one block over and over again on the streets of San Francisco?

or

2. A rolling billboard parking in the same place for a long time in Golden Gate Park?

Does the Miller Brewing Company, maker of beer with “fruity, hoppy undertones” per its yuppified website, know how its product is being promoted over here?

 

Giant Trucks Drive Right Through San Francisco’s Ban on New Billboards

Friday, July 25th, 2008

Is this what you want to encounter on the streets of San Francisco - a mobile billboard from Do It Outdoors? You see, S.F. is having a tussle over whether we should have new fixed billboards in town, but apparently there’s nothing stopping new mobile billboards from travelling all over the place.  

Rest assured, this trucking company is saying, “We Do It Green.” [Please note yet another delightful double entendre from Do It Outdoors - what a playful corporation!]. Brace yourself for more information about carbon offsets. That means the more they drive the better things get, just as the more water we import from the South Pacific, the better off we are, cause like Fiji Water is carbon negative or something.

From Vegas with love, on Hayes Street. Click to expand: 

img_9010-copy.jpg

There’s lots to ponder as you drive around sipping your MGD Light – like how getting your fossil fuel hydrocarbons from coal really sucks, but petroleum, well petroleum that powers trucks, that must be A-OK.

Is that what they call greenwashing?

The mind boggles….