Posts Tagged ‘dog’

Doberman + Skateboard + iPhone = Fun on JFK Drive in Golden Gate Park

Wednesday, October 23rd, 2013

See?

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Perfect Dog Harmony in NoPA, the “Northeast of the Panhandle Area” Part of the Western Addition

Thursday, September 26th, 2013

Tech Goes Too Far: Native-Born San Francisco Raccoon Thrown Down Stairs by Non Native-Born Kevin Rose

Monday, July 22nd, 2013

My dog Toaster was attacked by a raccoon

Can You Really Sign Binding Legal Documents with Your Handle? Yes – Meet “John The Animal Protector Mounier”

Monday, January 14th, 2013

Here he is:

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I’ve never seen anything like that in a signature line.

In other news, Charlie lives – he just got a life sentence on a farm someplace after his mouthpiece struck a plea bargain with Dennis Herrera and the San Francisco City Attorney’s Office.

But, come to think of it, attorney John Mounier is actually “The Animal Attacker Protector,” IRL.

Oh well.

Attention Dog Owners: Golden Gate Park is, Once Again, Coyote Country, So Leash Your Critters Accordingly

Monday, January 14th, 2013

You see this? This is JFK Jr. Drive in Golden Gate Park from over the weekend:

Another great nature shot from famous San Francisco photographer David Cruz. As always, He’s Everywhere You Want To Be

So this is a good time to review the rules:

“Can my dog walk around the park with me beyond the designated off-leash areas?

Yes, your four-legged friend may accompany you throughout the park if you both obey the leash laws of California.”

Otherwise, you’ll become another derided dog owner, like this one:

Remember, as soon as you use the term “voice control” you lose…

Nun Crossing on Gough Street

Tuesday, October 2nd, 2012

Little dog crossing as well. Bonus:

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How Many Goddam Pit Bulls are Too Many Goddam Pit Bulls for One McDonalds? Eight on Haight

Friday, September 28th, 2012

This was the scene last night at the famous Micky D’s at the end of Haight Street at Stanyan near famous Hippy Hill.

I passed by two pit-bull-looking dogs outside at the rear entrance, two pit-bull-looking dogs inside the store with owners on the way to the bathroom, two pit-bull-looking dogs with owners in line to buy food,* and two pit-bull-looking dogs as I exited out the front steps.**

Now, some of them might have been less than a year old, mere pups I suppose, and some of them might have been presa canarios or whathaveyou, but goddam, I didn’t expect to encounter eight fighting dogs*** in one minute at one McDonalds.

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I’m not particularly afraid of dogs at all and I’ve never been bitten, but that was my reaction.

And here’s an update – the Dollar Menu is still there but it’s not as prominent as before, as if they don’t want you to see it, it seems.

See you in about a year or so, Haight Street McDonalds.

*At this point, I was looking for an exit strategy, like if they all went Hera and Bane on me, I’d have hopped on one of the counters, that kind of thing. 

** Sans food. I was going to get a large order of fries and two side salads for $4-something for a special lady friend but the line was kind of long and there was some kind of kerfuffle going on so I said the Hell with this and left for the WF right across the street.

***The most I’ve seen in one place at one time.

 

Coffee Shop Lap Dog, Western Addition Style

Monday, August 27th, 2012

Woof woof:

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Kicking That Horrible Zynga Company When It’s Down – Ouch – Maybe They Should Have Moved Away

Friday, August 3rd, 2012

Wow, the first two-thirds of this short video from Kixeye is pure comedy gold:

Read the news and turn the pages:

“Zynga also hit an all-time low Thursday, trading down as far as $2.68 before closing at $2.70, a daily drop of 3.9 percent. After a shake-up in the San Francisco company’s management ranks, it faces two more class-action lawsuits, on top of one already filed earlier this week.”

The Feds Make a Deal to Set Aside More Space for Western Snowy Plovers, San Francisco’s Cutest Birds

Thursday, June 21st, 2012

The Center for Biological Diversity is crowing about more room being designated for the Western Snowy Plover along the west coast.

San Francisco isn’t getting more space for these critters but they already have as much as they need here now, not that some area dog owners agree with the way things are these days.

Anyway, here are some San Francisco Snowy Plovers and the also the deets of the new agreement with the Feds are below.

(Oh, and remember, as always, plover rhymes with lover.)

A snowy plover on Ocean Beach _not_ being harassed by a dog:

Now, Ocean Beach Dog, ooh, somebody over there got an off-leash ticket from the Feds a looooong time ago. (Can you guess what year by looking at the website design? Sure you can.) Oh well. Well, the Feds don’t like Ocean Beach Dog and people what behave like Ocean Beach Dog. The Feds consider us Whacko City, USA because of outfits like OBD, oh well.

Most dogs don’t bother the boids, of course. Can you see the snowy plover?

But some dogs do harass the birds. (These aren’t actually snowy plovers near Lawton and the Great Highway but the dogs don’t know or care about that.)

(Get those Ocean Beach birds, good boy!)

And here’s the sitch up in Crissy Field:

See the birds, see the unleashed dog?

Is is surprising to you that an unleashed dog could find and chase these plovers? What was surprising to me was to hear that this particular boid flew up from Morro Bay (where it was banded and which is like way south of here) all the way up to the Marina District:

Keep on keeping on, plovers:

More Than 24,000 Acres of Critical Habitat Protected for Western Snowy Plover

PORTLAND, Ore.— In response to a Center for Biological Diversity lawsuit, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today designated 24,527 acres (38 square miles) of critical habitat to protect the Pacific Coast population of threatened western snowy plovers in Washington, Oregon and California.

“Protecting critical habitat will help this lovely shorebird continue on the path to recovery,” said Tierra Curry, a conservation biologist at the Center. “Species with federally protected habitat are more than twice as likely to be moving toward recovery than species without it, so this puts a big safety net between plovers and extinction.”

Western snowy plovers breed primarily on beaches in southern Washington, Oregon, California and Baja California. Today’s designation includes four critical habitat units in Washington (covering 6,077 acres), nine units in Oregon (covering 2,112 acres) and 47 units in California (covering 16,337 acres).

Snowy plovers were listed as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act in 1993, when the coastal population had dropped to 1,500 birds and plovers no longer bred at nearly two-thirds of their former nesting sites. That Endangered Species Act protection allowed the population to increase to more than 3,600 adults by 2010.

Plovers are recovering but still face many threats, including widespread and frequent disturbance of nesting sites by humans, vehicles and off-leash dogs; crushing by off-road vehicles; global climate change; pesticide use; and habitat loss.

The western snowy plover was first granted 19,474 acres of critical habitat in 1999. In 2005 the Bush administration illegally reduced the critical habitat to 12,145 acres, eliminating protection for thousands of acres scientists believed necessary for the snowy plover’s survival and abandoning key habitat areas crucial for recovery. In 2008 the Center sued over the unlawful reduction of the plover’s habitat protections, leading to a settlement agreement with the Service and today’s revised designation.

Today’s final rule includes the reinstatement of habitat areas identified by government scientists as essential that were improperly withdrawn in 2005; inclusion of some areas not currently occupied by plovers but important for their recovery; and addition of habitats such as back-dune systems in an attempt to offset anticipated effects of sea-level rise caused by climate change.

The western snowy plover is a shy, pocket-sized shorebird that weighs less than two ounces and lives for three years. Plovers forage for worms, insects and crustaceans in wet sand and in kelp that has washed ashore. The word “plover” is thought to come from the Old French”plovier” or “rain bird” because plovers were seen on sandy French beaches during spring rains.

The Center for Biological Diversity is a national, nonprofit conservation organization with more than 375,000 members and online activists dedicated to the protection of endangered species and wild places.”

Oh, and also remember that San Francisco is for Plovers: