Posts Tagged ‘donors’

Word From the Asian Art Museum in Civic Center: “We Will Keep Our Doors Open and Maintain Operations”

Friday, November 19th, 2010

Well, I guess there’ll be no bailout from local billionaire and Asian Art Nut Larry Ellison anytime soon, but, no matter, it will carry on despite recent financial issues.

Now, for some reason, San Francisco went all out this year for the City of Shanghai and its World Expo. So, the AAA deserves credit for that when the City considers related matters in the future. (I mean, your World Expos, your America’s Cups, your Olympics, they mostly lose money right? They’re mostly a bad thing for the hosting cities and regions but mostly a good think for the politicians who make the deals and “win” the right to host whatever. Of course, I’m generally skeptical of those who want to take The People’s land, money, opportunities, whatever to pay for some extended party for the greater glory of a few electeds. Anyway…)

A nice ambiance just off Larkin Street, non?

Here’s the news:

“Asian Art Museum Open for Business

SAN FRANCISCO, November 18, 2010- San Francisco’s Asian Art Museum will keep its doors open and maintain operations despite financial challenges faced by the Asian Art Museum’s Foundation, which is the private fundraising arm of the Museum.

“The Museum is fortunate to have the support of donors from around the world. Donations from individuals, the Museum’s board, and our corporate and Foundation partners remain strong” said Jay Xu, director of the Asian Art Museum. “I want to assure the Museum’s visitors, our 17,000 members, and all of our donors and hundreds of volunteers that the Museum will continue to be a leading center for Asian learning in the future.”

While the City solely owns the Museum’s building and its collections, the City and the Foundation jointly fund the Museum’s staff, facilities, and operations.

The Museum continues to maintain its role as a vital source of Asian art and culture, averaging nearly 300,000 visitors per year. Like many other cultural organizations in California and across the United States, the Foundation is facing challenges stemming from the economic downturn and related market disruptions. The Foundation is attempting to renegotiate its debt financing with its principal creditors.  As a measure of prudent management of fiscal responsibility, the Foundation has engaged outside professionals, and, with City officials, has begun to work on these negotiations.

“While this has been a difficult situation, it will have no impact on the Museum’s core operations,” said Tony Sun, chair of the Asian Art Commission and Asian Art Museum Foundation, the Museum’s dual governing boards.

The Museum looks forward to welcoming visitors to its current critically acclaimed exhibition, Beyond Golden Clouds; Five Centuries of Japanese Screens, on view through January 16, 2011, as well as the upcoming major exhibitions Bali: Art, Ritual, Performance, on view February 25 through September 11, 2011, and Maharaja: The Splendor of India’s Royal Courts, on view Oct 21, 2011, through April 8, 2012.

About the Asian Art Museum
The Asian Art Museum is a public institution whose mission is to lead a diverse global audience in discovering the unique material, aesthetic, and intellectual achievements of Asian art and culture. Holding more than 17,000 Asian art treasures spanning 6,000 years of history, the Museum is one of the largest museums in the Western world devoted exclusively to Asian art.

Information: (415) 581-3500
or www.asianart.org
Location: 200 Larkin Street, San Francisco, CA 94102″

Jerry Brown Says No to Concealing the Identities of Proposition 8 Donors

Thursday, January 22nd, 2009

Some folks have been up in arms over the disclosure laws that apply to people who gave money promoting California’s recent Proposition 8. You know, the one about same-sex marriage. Donors might feel “exposed,” says the New York Times.

So of course there’s a lawsuit over this now. If you want, read what the Attorney General has to say himself. It’s a fairly accessible document. Or, take the easy way out, and read on, below.

California’s dogged AG:

via “Thomas Hawk’s” Photostream

Brown Moves to Block Effort to Conceal Proposition 8 Donors

“Attorney General Edmund G. Brown Jr. today filed a brief in federal court opposing a preliminary injunction that would conceal the identities of contributors to the Yes on Proposition 8 campaign.

Political democracy demands open debate, including prompt disclosure of the identities of campaign donors,” Attorney General Brown said. “Backers of Proposition 8 should not be allowed to carve out a special privilege of anonymity for themselves alone.”

The opposition brief, filed today with the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of California, contends that Proposition 8 supporters do not meet the criteria for the limited exemption to valid campaign disclosure laws, an exemption developed by the Supreme Court to protect the ability of historically persecuted minority parties to engage in political speech. This limited exemption has applied to groups like the Socialist Workers Party in Ohio and the NAACP in Alabama in 1958, which both demonstrated that disclosure would result in significant harm and threaten the viability of their organizations.

By contrast, the supporters of Proposition 8 are a well-financed association of individuals who raised nearly $30 million in support of a ballot measure that received 52.3 percent of the vote. There is no risk that disclosure of donors will harm their ability to organize or otherwise pursue their political views.

Additionally, there is no justification to shield donors from post-election reporting requirements. Rather, these requirements help to prevent kickbacks, laundering, and other improper uses of campaign funds.

Any instances of violence or harassment against donors are deeply regrettable, but California’s civil and criminal justice systems are the appropriate venues to seek relief from potentially illegal conduct.

The bottom line is that the State’s campaign finance disclosure laws result in more speech, not less, and the public’s interest is better served in this case by requiring disclosure from those supporters of Proposition 8 who donated $100 or more.”