Posts Tagged ‘drug’

Uh Oh: DPT Refuses to Ticket Parked Cars at Turk and Taylor – Are the Meter Maids Afraid of Twitterloin Thugs?

Thursday, February 14th, 2013

Check it, naive Oberlin grad Karin Drucker sends out a Valentine to the SFMTA MUNI DPT right here, in corrupt Randy Shaw’s corrupt, government-subsidized Beyond Chron blog.

Ouch.

I might have made a comment on her post, but, you know, corrupt Randy Shaw’s corrupt, government-subsidized Beyond Chron blog doesn’t allow comments, because Randy Shaw doesn’t want to hear what the proletariat has to say. (Isn’t that funny? And isn’t it funny that you can donate money to  the highly-political Beyond Chron blog and then deduct that donation from your taxes? How is that right? How is that legal? I don’t know.)

Of course, the average meter maid doesn’t have too much of an incentive to hang out on the 000 block of Turk, right? I mean, that’s the place where the SFPD tells criminals to do their thing, you know, when they loiter about too close to the front of Our Flagship Nordstrom, for example.

Anyway, this unticketing policy of the SFMTA is news to me.

So this means that, finally, the taxpayer-subsidized Beyond Chron has taught me something asides from how great and prescient Randy Shaw is.

Hurray!

Here’s the “unit block” of Turk as I saw it last week, just saying:  

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News from Santa Cruz: Born a Man, Died a Woman – Ashawna (Shawn) Hailey Bequests Millions for Marijuana Legalization

Friday, June 1st, 2012

Pretty much.

Check it:

“Software Pioneer Leaves $10 Million Bequest To Five Leading Non-profits In Health And Drug Policy Reform

SANTA CRUZ, Calif., May 30, 2012  – This year, five leading non-profits at the forefront of health and drug policy reform will benefit from a generous bequest of approximately $10 million from the estate of software pioneer Ashawna (Shawn) Hailey. The gift will dramatically increase these organizations’ ability to reform government policies and public attitudes about health and drug policy.

Half of the total bequest–approximately $5 million–will benefit the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS), a non-profit research and educational organization working with the FDA and international regulatory agencies to develop psychedelics and marijuana into prescription treatments for patients with unmet medical needs. The gift will be the largest that MAPS has ever received, and will support research into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This treatment is currently in Phase 2 pilot studies and is showing very promising results.

MAPS is conducting an international series of Phase 2 pilot studies into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). These studies are laying the groundwork for two larger multi-site Phase 3 trials, required to show the FDA that MDMA is a safe and effective adjunct to psychotherapy for patients with PTSD.

The rest of Ashawna’s gift–about $1.25 million each–will support the efforts of the American Civil Liberties Union, the Drug Policy Alliance, the Marijuana Policy Project, and Second Harvest Food Bank.

Ashawna’s generous bequest is one of only a small number of such gifts to the ACLU. “Her bequest puts a spotlight on our nation’s punitive drug policies, which have failed to achieve public safety and health while putting unprecedented numbers of people behind bars and eroding constitutional rights,” said Vanita Gupta, Deputy Legal Director of the ACLU.

The Drug Policy Alliance will use Ashawna’s gift to strengthen its movement-building efforts. “Ashawna was generous to DPA in her lifetime and beyond because she wanted to build the strongest movement possible to end the drug war and replace it with policies that promote her values of freedom and compassion,” said Ethan Nadelmann, DPA’s executive director. “We’re honored by this bequest, and we will use it to sustain and strengthen the aspects of the movement that were important to her.”

“Our budget this year is only $5 million, so this bequest is turbocharging our efforts to end marijuana prohibition in the United States,” said Rob Kampia, executive director of the Marijuana Policy Project in Washington, D.C. “In fact, Ashawna will likely be our biggest donor this year, and we’ll be using half of her gift to pass the ballot initiative to regulate marijuana like alcohol in Colorado on November 6.”

“This transformative gift from Ashawna will help to ensure that everyone in our community who needs a meal can get one,” said Kathy Jackson, CEO of Second Harvest Food Bank. “She accomplished so much both in her professional life and through her philanthropy, and we are honored that she put her trust in Second Harvest Food Bank with this legacy gift.”

Hailey died on October 14, 2011, in her San Jose, Calif., home at the age of 62. She passed peacefully, and is survived by her children Neal and Nora, and by her twin brother Kim.

After graduating from Texas Tech University in 1970, Shawn designed the launch sequencer for the Sprint Antiballistic Missile System for the Martin Marietta Corporation and in 1974 designed the 9080 microprocessor for AMD. Shawn and Kim co-founded Meta-Software Corp. in 1979 and their HSPICE program remains the gold standard circuit simulator for the electronic design industry.”

And that’s your news from Santa Cruz.

I am a Lineman for the County: In Addition to Blowing People Up in San Bruno, PG&E Also Keeps Our Overhead Wires Shoe-Free

Tuesday, April 24th, 2012

This PG&E worker has the fun job of removing shoes from lines* overhead.

As seen in the Western Addition, ‘neath the Western Hemisphere’s largest classical dome.**

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My what a long pole you have…

_________________________

This post was brought to you by:

PG&E: Yes We’re America’s Worst Large Utility Company, But What Can  _You_ Do About It?

*A reference to “the first existential country song.” (Ignore the first ten seconds – it’s a little what you call saccharine.)

Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the “500 Greatest Songs of All Time” ranked “Wichita Lineman” at #192. 

“the greatest pop song ever composed” 

“one of those rare songs that seems somehow to exist in a world of its own – not just timeless but ultimately outside of modern music”

I know I need a small vacation 
but it don’t look like rain 
And if it snows that stretch down south 
won’t ever stand the strain 
And I need you more than want you 
and I want you for all time 
And the PG&E Lineman is still on the line

**Yes, larger than the U.S. Capitol’s. On purpose.

Aging Pop Star Tries to Stay Hip: Madonna’s MDMA Ecstacy Drug Reference on Official San Francisco Ad Space in Union Square

Monday, April 2nd, 2012

Or Lower Market near Union Square, or the Financial District, whatever.

Anyway, I guess this is clever:

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Have you seen Molly?

Anyway, thanks for supporting MUNI, Madge.

Your Alarmist Food News of the Day: Lead-Contaminated Honey from China Makes Up One-Third of U.S. Supply?

Friday, August 19th, 2011

Writer Andrew Schneider has been all over his adulterated honey story for a while.

Via Kyle Mizokami, here it is:

Asian Honey, Banned in Europe, Is Flooding U.S. Grocery Shelves – FDA has the laws needed to keep adulterated honey off store shelves but does little, honey industry says.”

Do you buy all that?

So, you see, the mom-and-pop ops in the PRC use lead solder in their unlined honey collection vessels and then the honey gets transshipped to India and then it comes here because it’s banned in the EU, or something like that.

Seems plausible…

TL Update: Is Leavenworth and Golden Gate a “Drug-Free School Zone” or a School-Free Drug Zone?

Tuesday, June 7th, 2011

The sign that you can see in front of the Big Boy Market (aka Niño Grande with the “e” in a different font, showing that it was forgotten about, initially) indicates the former, but my eyes, after witnessing zero schools and mad drug dealers shouting, “Five-oh, five-oh,” well my eyes say the latter.

But why don’t you drop by to say hi and then judge for yourself. After all, this part of the unreconstructed Uptown Tenderloin Crime District is rated a perfect 100 by Walk Score. It’s a Walker’s Paradise, they say. (But IRL, it’s not – you should totally stay out this part of the TL, IMO.)

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‘Til next time, Niño Grande.


On Sale at a Mission Street Walgreens: Belts! Sexy Belts! Berry Sexy Belts! Berry, Berry Sexy Belts!

Thursday, April 28th, 2011

See?

They have a whole assortment:

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RAND Corp. Says Influence of Mexican Drug Trafficking is Exaggerated, So Marijuana Legalization is No Big Deal

Tuesday, October 12th, 2010

Seems like our RAND Corporation always has something interstesting to say. Like today, for instance, they’re talking about the affects of marijuana legalization in California, if that ever happens.

It’s a little nuanced, so prepare yourself now.

Arnold on the ganga, in Africa, back in the day. How will he celebrate the passage of Prop 19?

 

All the deets:

Legalizing Marijuana in California Will Not Dramatically Reduce Mexican Drug Trafficking Revenues

Legalizing marijuana in California will not dramatically reduce the drug revenues collected by Mexican drug trafficking organizations from sales to the United States, according to a new RAND Corporation study.

The only scenario where legalization in California could substantially reduce the revenue of the drug trafficking organizations is if high-potency, California-produced marijuana is smuggled to other U.S. states at prices that are lower than those of current Mexican supplies, according to the study from the RAND Drug Policy Research Center. RAND is a nonprofit research organization.

The study calculates that Mexican drug trafficking organizations generate only $1 billion to $2 billion annually from exporting marijuana to the United States and selling it to wholesalers, far below existing estimates by the government and other groups.

The RAND study also finds that the often-cited claim that marijuana accounts for 60 percent of gross drug export revenues of Mexican drug trafficking organizations is not credible. RAND’s exploratory analysis on this point suggests that 15 percent to 26 percent is a more credible range. Given that California accounts for about 14 percent of the nation’s marijuana use, this suggests that if marijuana legalization in California only influences the California market, it would have a small effect on drug trafficking organizations — cutting total drug export revenues by perhaps 2 to 4 percent.

However, the impact of legalization on Mexican drug trafficking organizations’ bottom line could be magnified if marijuana cultivated in California is smuggled into other states, according to the study. After legalization, if low-cost, high-quality marijuana produced in California dominates the U.S. marijuana market, then the Mexican drug trafficking organizations’ revenue from exporting marijuana could decline by more than 65 percent and probably closer to 85 percent. In this scenario, results from the RAND study suggest the drug trafficking organizations would lose roughly 20 percent of their total drug export revenues.

Ever more deets, after the jump

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Jerry Brown Throws Down: Hair Care Products Removed from Store Shelves in California

Tuesday, March 16th, 2010

Our California Attorney General Jerry Brown can’t abide you polluting the air with hair care products not legal for sale in California. So he just announced a court judgment against Pro’s Choice Beauty Care, Inc, a New York-based distributor – now they’re blocked from selling “pollution-causing” products in CA.

Product is coming off the shelves right now at your K Marts, your RiteAids, your Targets, etc.

That means no illicit Big Sexy Hair Dense for Big Jerry:

These particular products weren’t meant for sale to Californians, so let’s assume that similar hairsprays and gels and whatnot, you know, all those things that you’ll see on sale tomorrow, have been given the O.K. Feel free to shop away.

All the deets:

Brown Removes Pollution-Causing Products from Store Shelves

Oakland-Attorney General Edmund G. Brown Jr. today announced a court judgment against Pro’s Choice Beauty Care, Inc., a New York-based hair care product distributor, blocking the company from selling “pollution-causing” products that also exacerbate respiratory illnesses.

The judgment also requires the retailers Rite Aid, Long’s Drug Stores, CVS Pharmacy, Walgreen Company, Ralphs Grocery Company, Kmart and Target to remove these products at all California stores.

“Pro’s Choice sold thousands of containers of pollution-causing hair products to consumers who unknowingly exposed themselves and the environment to harmful pollutants,” Brown said. “Today’s agreement will remove products from store shelves that pollute our air and exacerbate respiratory diseases such as asthma.”

Pro’s Choice, the largest distributor of professional hair care and nail products in the country, buys U.S. brand-name products overseas and re-imports the products to sell them below suggested retail value. The products are then redistributed to pharmacies, grocery chains, and wholesale clubs throughout the country.

In late 2006, the California Air Resources Board (CARB) and several district attorneys notified Brown’s office that many products supplied by Pro’s Choice contained air contaminants well above the state’s limits on volatile organic compounds (VOCs.) Despite numerous tests and repeated violations and requests for compliance, Pro’s Choice continued to sell these products to retailers.

Brown’s office filed a lawsuit against the company in 2008. The company was charged with violating California’s Health and Safety Code 4200 et seq., which protects air quality and prevents companies from intentionally discharging pollutants into the air.

VOCs significantly contribute to the formation of smog. Under California law, depending on whether the product is a hair spray, mousse, gel or styling product, each must meet California’s stringent standards for VOC content. According to the American Lung Association’s 2009 State of the Air Report, California has five of the top-ten worst smog areas and the highest rate of asthma in the country.

Some of the non-compliant products Pro’s Choice resold to retailers include:

- Big Sexy Hair Dense at a Target in Modesto, CA;
- Redken Fabricate at a RiteAid in Modesto, CA;
- Sebastian Threads Microber Cream at a K-Mart in Lodi, CA;
- Sebastian Shaper Plus at Ralphs in Sacramento, CA;
- John Paul Mitchell Freeze and Shine Super Spray Firm Hold at Longs in Stockton, CA; and,
- Short Sexy Hair Hard Up Gel at Rite Aid in Torrance, CA.

Today’s judgment requires Pro’s Choice to:
- Stop selling or distributing products that violate the limits of VOCs;
- Pull all of the products found in violation;
- Identify and sort products that are non-compliant before distributing them for sale in California;
- Obtain written verification from the manufacturer

Jerry Brown Throws Down: State AGs Take On Abbott Labs for Blocking Generic Competition

Thursday, January 7th, 2010

California Attorney General Jerry Brown can’t abide big drug companies illegally blocking cheap generic substitutes from coming to market in a timely fashion. Check out the news just released by Press Secretary Christine Gasparac about Abbott Laboratories (ABT) and Groupe Fourner SA and how they impeded generic competition for the cholesterol-reducing drug Tricor.

All the deets are below and here’s a pdf of the $22.5 million settlement announced this morning.

El Protector De La Gente, Jerry Brown.

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California and 23 States Reach $25 Million Settlement Against Pharmaceutical Companies that Blocked Generic Drugs

Oakland-Attorney General Edmund G. Brown Jr. and 23 other state attorneys general today announced a $22.5 million settlement with pharmaceutical giants Abbott and Fournier after the companies “illegally blocked” cheaper generic substitutes for the cholesterol-reducing drug Tricor.

The settlement is the result of one of the country’s first legal actions challenging pharmaceutical companies for “product hopping,” a strategy to block generic competition by making slight changes to the formulation of a drug.

“Abbott and Fournier devised a complex scheme that illegally blocked cheaper generic drugs from entering the market,” Brown said. “They used minor reformulations of the drug to delay competition and filed frivolous patent lawsuits. This scheme cost California and other states millions of dollars.”

Beginning in 1998, Abbott and Fournier, two of the nation’s largest pharamaceutical companies, partnered to manufacture and distribute Tricor, a cholesterol-reducing drug. Tricor’s annual sales were in excess of $750 million.

By 2002, as Tricor’s patents were set to expire, several drug companies sought approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to market a generic drug equivalent to Tricor. To be approved by the FDA, the generic-drug manufacturer must prove that its drug has the same active ingredients and the same labeling as the brand-name drug, in addition to being a therapeutic equivalent of the brand-name product.

Once a generic drug is approved for market, the market share for a brand-name drug like Tricor can decrease by up to 80 percent. Most states and group health plans require pharmacists to substitute the generic drug for a brand-name drug to get the cost benefit of the cheaper generic version.

Knowing generic manufacturers were attempting to enter the market, the lawsuit alleged that Abbott and Fournier devised a complex scheme to delay and prevent the approval and marketing of generic versions of Tricor. The companies made minor changes in the form and dosage strength of Tricor that did not provide any significant health benefits over previous Tricor formulations. These minor changes interfered with and delayed any FDA approval of the generics.

To further delay the process, Abbott and Fournier also filed more than a dozen lawsuits against generic drug manufacturers Teva Pharmaceuticals and Impax Laboratories because the law prohibits the FDA from approving a generic drug for 30 months after patent-infringement lawsuits have been filed. After the 30-month automatic stays expired, all of the suits were eventually dismissed.

As a result of the scheme, Abbott and Fournier recorded Tricor sales exceeding $1 billion at the expense of consumers and state governments.

Today’s settlement agreement requires the companies to cease illegal efforts to block generic competition to Tricor and to pay the states approximately $22.5 million dollars. In California, the Department of General Services, Medi-Cal and the Department of Corrections will be reimbursed for overcharges.

States joining California in today’s lawsuit include: Arizona, Arkansas, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Florida, Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Maryland, Minnesota, Missouri, Nevada, New York, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Washington, and West Virginia.