Posts Tagged ‘editor’

What, Somebody’s _Starting_ a Newspaper in San Francisco? Presenting Issue One of “HATCH Beat” from Liz Fedak of Illinois

Saturday, May 17th, 2014

Well, here it is, an actual real 8-page newspaper “serving Cole Valley, Alamo Square, Hayes Valley and the Haights” – it’s the brand-new HAtCHBeat, Issue One*

Now meet Liz Fedak, Publisher.

Somebody who tried something like this a little while back was Eve Batey. Her online-only effort didn’t work out.

And speaking of online-only, Hoodline (mostly covering “Divisadero, Hayes Valley, Lower Haight, Upper Haight,” mostly) comes to mind as there’s a lot of overlap there. Liz has carved out an area that we can call District 5 Less The Inner Sunset.

Who’s taken notice already? How about D5 Supervisor London Breed** with her City Hall column and SFPD Park Station Captain Gregory Corrales with his Police Beat? 

And add to that an alphabet soup of SFGov departments, including advertisers with big ads such as the Department of Elections and the SF Public Library.

Check it out if you can. You’ll see a bit about Jimmy’s Old Car Picnic (1988-2013) that takes a decidedly anti-RPD position.

That was the wind-up, now here’s the pitch:

Do you have interest in writing, photography or videography? Whether you have experience or not, send an email to editor@hatchbeat.com to get involved.”

Leaving you with the categories to be covered:

Business + Money — HATCH Beat
Parenting — HATCH Beat
Profiles — HATCH Beat
Community — HATCH Beat
Calendar — HATCH Beat
Pets — HATCH Beat
Food + Drink — HATCH Beat
Police Blotter — HATCH Beat
Entertainment — HATCH Beat

I’ll tell you, I was startled to see this small newspaper – it just cruised in under the radar and onto my stoop.

 Bon courage, HAtCHBeat!

*AFAIK

**The 2014 London Breed. A bit more sedate than the Fuck Willie Brown-era London Breed of 2012-2013.

Wow, the Uptown Tenderloin Housing Clinic’s Randy Shaw is Hopping Mad at the SF Chronicle – Let’s Take a Look

Friday, January 10th, 2014

All right, here we go:, with excerpts:

“Chronicle Gets No Stars for Falsehoods About All Star Hotel
by Randy Shaw‚ Jan. 10‚ 2014

The heart of the story—-and title of the sfgate.com version, “Slanted Floors Hotel”—blamed THC for hotel’s floors “slanted so badly that people were falling down. “ But the article does not reveal that the All Star has never been cited by the city for “slanted floors.”

ALL RIGHT, BUT JUST BECAUSE THE ALL-STAR HAS NEVER BEEN CITED BY THE CITY, DOES THAT MEAN THAT THE ALL-STAR DOESN’T HAVE SLANTED FLOORS? THE QUESTION IS WHETHER THE FLOORS ARE SLANTED. SO, ARE THEY IRL? ALSO, WHO ARE YOU, RANDY SHAW, TO DETERMINE WHAT THE “HEART OF THE STORY” IS? _I_ DON’T THINK IT’S THE HEART OF THE STORY. AND I THINK THAT STATEMENT WAS ID’ED AS A STATEMENT IN THE RECORDS OF SFGOV. WELL, IS IT REALLY A STATEMENT IN THE RECORDS OF SFGOV?  THAT’S WHAT YOUR DEFAMATION ATTORNEY (HEH!) WILL ASK ABOUT, RANDY SHAW

“San Francisco has many buildings with outstanding code violations impacting tenants lives, but the only news hook for writing about the All Star— which does not have such violations—was to attack a nonprofit operator.”

NOW WHAT KIND OF NONPROFIT OPERATOR IS THE TENDERLOIN HOUSING CLINIC – A GOOD ONE? I DON’T THINK SO. HERE’S SOME BACKGROUND, FROM A LONG TIME AGO: Randy Shaw’s Power Plays.

“I’ve seen a lot of bad reporting in my time, but the Chronicle’s attack on the THC (publisher of Beyond Chron) is among the worst.”

 IS THIS HOW YOU ARGUE, RANDY SHAW?

“A reporter with no concern with facts, and a city editor unwilling to promptly correct admitted falsehoods, resulted in a prominent article defaming the hard working janitors, desk clerks, maintenance workers, case managers and management staff at the All Star Hotel.”

WELL, THAT’S LIKE YOUR CONCLUSION, MAN. TAKE IT TO COURT RANDY! BUT YOU’LL LOSE.

“The Chronicle’s core problem was that there are no outstanding code violations impacting tenants at the All Star Hotel.”

RANDY, I THINK _YOUR_ THE ONE WITH _THE PROBLEM_, RIGHT? AND ARE YOU SAYING THAT THE HOTEL IN QUESTION DOESN’T HAVE ANY CODE VIOLATIONS ANY MORE? WHY DON’T WE SEND AN INSPECTION TEAM TO LOOK FOR SOME? OH, WHAT’S THAT, RANDY SHAW SAYS THAT ALL THAT MATTERS ARE CODE VIOLATIONS CURRENTLY “IMPACTING” TENANTS? WHO MAKES THAT CALL? IS IT YOU, RANDY SHAW? HOW DOES THAT WORK?

“Chronicle reporters all have my email address and most my cell phone number yet this reporter failed to contact the person at THC who deals with media inquiries.”

RANDY, HOW DO YOU KNOW THAT _ALL_ REPORTERS AT THE CHRONICLE HAVE YOUR EMAIL ADDRESS? THE REPORTER CONTACTED YOUR ORG AND HE DIDN’T GET A RESPONSE, RIGHT? WELL, THAT’S WE HE WROTE, RIGHT?

“Nothing in the story refutes the statement by THC’s manager that all violations were addressed.”

THE HEART OF THE STORY IS ABOUT _PAST_ VIOLATIONS THOUGH, RIGHT? AND HOW LONG DID THAT PROCESS TAKE?

But then the Chronicle allows Eldon Brown, who has no technical expertise and has likely filed more DBI complaints than all of THC’s over 1700 tenants combined (32 alone in 2012-13), to raise fears of tenant safety by making baseless claims about an unstable building.

DOES ONE NEED TO HAVE “TECHNICAL EXPERTISE” TO FILE A COMPLAINT WITH DBI? THAT DOESN’T SOUND RIGHT. AND THE QUESTION IS WHETHER THE BUILDING IS UNSTABLE. WELL, IS IT? AND YOU ONLY HAVE 1700 TENANTS? AREN’T YOU THE LARGEST NONPROFIT IN SF? MAYBE WE SHOULD JUST STOP GIVING YOU MONEY, HUH RANDY SHAW?

“THC is reviewing its legal options.”

YOU’RE NOT GOING TO SUE ANYBODY, YOU BIG BLOWHARD.

HEY, RANDY SHAW. WHY DON’T YOU DO A BETTER JOB WITH THE MONEY WE GIVE YOUR ORG – HOW ABOUT THAT?

Randy Shaw’s Phoney-Baloney “Uptown” Tenderloin Protest Gets Covered by His Phoney-Baloney “Beyond Chron”

Friday, May 31st, 2013

Here’s a little background on Randy Shaw, who pays himself a six-figure salary with your money, who lives in a house bigger than yours, who lives in a neighborhood better than yours, who lives farther away from the Tenderloin than you, you know, in the next county over:

“Randy Shaw’s Power Plays – Sixteen years ago, Randy Shaw started a housing clinic with $50 and a good idea: educating tenants. Now he’s got more than $900,000 a year to spend — and clout to match.”

And that was written seventeen years ago.

And what good has the Tenderloin Housing Clinic Beyond Chron Randy Shaw empire done with the hundreds of millions given to it by SFGov the past third of century or so, anything at all?

Well you should take a tour of the place when you get the chance.

Speaking of which, Randy Shaw wants our Chief of Police to take a tour of the Twitterloin so the rent-seekers of the Twitterloin should walk on down to the Hall of Justice with a demand to take a tour of the Twitterloin?

And who’s paying for this foofaraw?

I’ll give you just one guess, San Francisco Taxpayer.

Anyway, here’s part of it, from the house organ of the Randy Shaw empire:

“Tenderloin Residents Challenge Chief Suhr to Tour Neighborhood, Increase Police 
by Karin Drucker‚ May. 31‚ 2013

“A delegation of 30 Tenderloin residents and workers went to the Hall of Justice on May 30 to deliver petitions including over 1500 signatures to SFPD Chief Greg Suhr.”

AND WHO’S PAYING FOR THIS? SFGOV? PERHAPS THE SFMTA COULD PAY ITSELF TO MARCH OVER TO THE SFPUC TO COMPLAIN ABOUT ILLEGAL PARKING BY SFPUC EMPLOYEES?

“As BeyondChron reported yesterday, people were lining up for nearly two weeks to sign the petitions, which invited Suhr to visit the Tenderloin to get a first-hand view of the need for more police and to then announce whether he was satisfied with neighborhood safety.”

OOH, I KNOW,  WHY DON’T WE DEFUND THE TENDERLOIN HOUSING CLINIC TO FREE UP MONEY TO PAY FOR MORE POLICE DEDICATED FOR THE TENDERLOIN? I’LL BET _THAT_ PROPOSAL WOULD MEET WITH GREG SUHR’S APPROVAL!

“In fact, the petition is perhaps most notable because it refutes the common-place narrative that residents of the Tenderloin do not care about the state of public safety. It’s just not true.”

THIS IS COLLEGE GIRL KARIN DRUCKER, FROM OBERLIN WITH LOVE, JUST A YEAR OR TWO AGO, ACTUALLY, ATTEMPTING TO SLAY HER SELF-CREATED STRAW DOG. UH, DO YOU DO _EVERYTHING_ RANDY SHAW TELLS YOU TO DO? ISN’T THAT, IN ITSELF, “DEMEANING” TO YOURSELF? BTW, WELCOME TO CALIFORNIA,  WAN OBIE.

ON IT GOES…

Now ironically, we’re in the era of stepped-up patrols in the greater Tenderloin area.

Like this was the scene on Market just yesterday, just as Randy Shaw was dispatching his flying monkeys to the HOJ:

Click to expand

I’m counting four fresh-faced recruits near Fifth heading towards Sixth. Of course this might not be the exact block (of Skid Row or the Tenderloin or the Twitterloin or whatever you want to call the area that the Tenderloin Housing Clinic has created over the years) that Randy Shaw wants patrolled but it’s something new, right?

On It Goes…

An Illustrated Guide to the YouTube Viral Video “When trannys attack! Tenderloin craziness!” – What’s Marke B’s Deal?

Wednesday, February 13th, 2013

Not sure what Marke Bieschke’s deal is here.

‘Cause this is an arresting video, trannies or no. (Oh let’s run a search here - only 1600 hits on Google when you look for the words Marke and tranny in the same article at SFBG.com? Mmmm…)

But let’s take a look at the video, d’accord? D’accord.

Five foot nothing, barefoot, and wearing white PJ’s in Randy Shaw’s corrupt greater Uptown Tenderloin Twitterloin area – she has the fight in her but she lacks the stuff she needs, you know, like reach:

So she spent most of this squabble caught by her hair, oh well:

Well, at least he didn’t Break My Window to get the purse out of this aging BMW:

After you see your gf’s purse disappear into Randy Shaw’s corrupt Uptown Tenderloin, all you can do is point as the perp flees. (Is that a moose tattoo on his now naked torso?)

The purse snatching definitely led to a brief cessation of hostilities:

And the, in the end, a swift sucker punch, you know, to say good-bye:

Just Another Day in Randy Shaw’s “Uptown Tenderloin” in the Twitterloin – Video: “When trannys attack! Tenderloin craziness!”

Monday, February 11th, 2013

The dreams of Randy Shaw:

By the summer of 2008, going “uptown” in San Francisco will mean heading to the Tenderloin

Now here’s the reality of the winter of 2013, with two people going “uptown” on each other, via Bluoz:

Oh Randy, will you ever win, you know, with the hundreds of millions of taxpayer dollars given to you over the years?

Do You Live South of Market? This is Your Chance to Own the LiveSOMA Blog! A 3.5 Year Run

Thursday, December 6th, 2012

Here’s the news from LiveSOMA:

“With the birth of my first son, a ridiculously overwhelming list of work-related projects, and the fact that I was recently priced out of the South of Market Neighborhood and forced to move to a part of the City where homeless people aren’t constantly pooping on my doorstep (GASP!), I have decided not to continue.

With that said, if anyone out there would like to dust off LiveSOMA, I will gladly help you take it over. I would really hate to see the site- and its years of development- go to waste. Just shoot me an email. If not, I will be pulling the plug after the new year.”

Attention News-Gatherers: Now You Can Buy a News-Gathering Drone for $290 at Costco #144 – Control with Cell Phone

Wednesday, November 14th, 2012

It’s kind of  new, it’s totally for you. It’s the Parrot Quadricopter AR Drone 2.0.

I told you all about this contraption before, but at the time it was only available online. These days, you can head on down to the SoMA Costco (America’s First Urban Costco) and get one for less than $300.

Then, you train your new pet to listen to simple commands from your cell phone (yes, there’s an app for that) and then you’re on your way to a Pulitzer:

Click to expand

 

Attention Bay Area Media: Buy a Drone – Built-In Camcorder – Operate with iPhone – $320 at Costco – Do It

Tuesday, July 10th, 2012

It’s new, it’s you. It’s the Parrot Quadricopter AR Drone 2.0.

Your Android or iOS device, which you already have, can run an app to tell this thing where to go.

Then you can get video like this.

Oh, and they throw in an extra battery for you.

And don’t worry too much about any legal hassles.

Get with the times, people.

Oh Snap! MSM Media Smackdown of the Year: SFoodie’s Jonathan Kauffman vs. SF Chronicle Staff Writer Stacy Finz

Monday, November 28th, 2011

I don’t know, I think this is going to be it, here’s the best media smackdown for 2011.

So there I was on the Twitter and I saw this from John Birdsall:

“RT @jonkauffman: The Chron and the GGRA seem to be going after food trucks. What’s wrong with this story? http://t.co/WhjP1GLX

Intriguing, non? So I click on over to read “The Chronicle and the GGRA Go After Food Trucks

So then I’m all like yes, yes, yes, that’s exactly right, Jonathan Kauffman!

Go ahead, check it out, the “flawed” piece in the Chron: ”Restaurants want to put brakes on food trucks.”

OK then.

To Tempest Bar’s Tony Cooney:

Uh, gee, maybe your place isn’t so hot for lunch. Why not work on that instead of crying like a baby? Perhaps you should shut down or move? 

To “San Francisco merchants, property managers and restaurant owners”:

This is America, Land of the Free, right? (Cough, you’re just a bunch of rent seekers, cough)

To “opponents [who] complain that the law doesn’t limit the number of food trucks that can operate in a specific location”:

Tough cookies!

To Rob Black, “a lawyer and executive director of Golden Gate Restaurant Association”:

Lo-ser! (You gotta say that one the right way, as if harrasing Darryl Strawberry from the bleachers. I mean, c’mon, do you think that a nerdy, downtown-backed lawyer out of U.C. Hastings College of Law would ever have a prayer of becoming Supervisor of District Six?)

To “those motherfuckers at the Golden Gate Restaurant Association“:

FUCK YOU. Oh, wait a second, that’s not my line, that’s a direct quote from Chris Daly’s wife back in 2006. And at the time I thought, “Gee, what an odd thing to say.” But I’m starting to understand what she was talking about.

For example, Chris Daly wanted letter grades from the health department posted outside of San Francisco restaurants but the GGRA put the kibosh on that. Mmmm. Now, let’s take the time to explore this.

Check it:

“An overwhelming 83% of San Francisco surveyors say they agree that restaurants should be required to conspicuously post a letter grade reflecting the results of their health department inspection (as recently passed in NYC, taking a cue from LA).”

Consumers want this, but the GGRA doesn’t so guess what, we don’t have it. You know what GGRA? The bottom 20% of your members shouldn’t even be in business, so why do you spend so much time defending them?  

Hey, let’s see what Stanford Economist Phil Leslie has to say about letter grading:

“Sales at restaurants receiving an A grade rose 5.7 percent, or about $15,000 a year. B-level restaurant sales increased 0.7 percent, and sales at C-level establishments decreased 1 percent.”

So you don’t want that* for your members, huh, GGRA? 

I don’t know why restaurant owners in San Francisco expect so much. I don’t know why they don’t expect to ever have any competition.

Remember this earlier in the year, when a struggling restaurateur went apeshit and starting parking her SUV specifically to block a food truck?

I’ll put a credit in if you want, but I don’t think you do. She’s still out there. 

Oh, different day, different street, different truck, different obstructionist but the same purpose of parking vehicles in spaces to kick food trucks out of San Francisco.

I’ll put a credit in if you want, but I don’t think you do. That owner is still out there. 

Struggling restaurateurs go after food trucks for the same reason they go after Yelp, IMO.

Speaking of which, maybe this is the kind of thing what fuels the wrath of legacy restaurant owners?

This review is completely devoid of the passion associated with the Japanese Curry truck fiasco.

Foodwise: Salads = 3 stars, (Mixt Greens / Working Girls/ Sellers Mkt and even Portico or Lee’s are better though). Sandwiches = 1 star (this has become an office joke.  $8+ for two pieces of meat, 1 teaspoon of sourkraut, and 1 piece of cheese.  Not prepared to order, sitting in a cooler behind the counter!

Service: meh.

AtmosphereAwkward flow from left to right , pleasant enough tables outside

Price: Crap.  My salad was smaller than any of the choices above but cost more.  And I went simple.”

Could be.

In closing, let’s all give thanks to SFoodie Jonathan Kauffman.

Congratulations, JK, on winning MSM Media Smackdown of the Year, 2011.

*”This study examines the effect of an increase in product quality information to consumers on firms’choices of product quality. In 1998, Los Angeles County introduced hygiene quality grade cards to bedisplayed in restaurant windows. We show that the grade cards cause (i) restaurant health inspection scores to increase, (ii) consumer demand to become sensitive to changes in restaurants’ hygiene quality,and (iii) the number of foodborne illness hospitalizations to decrease. We also provide evidence thatthis improvement in health outcomes is not fully explained by consumers substituting from poor hygiene restaurants to good hygiene restaurants. These results imply the grade cards cause restaurants to make hygiene quality improvements”

“The False Promise of Cheap Water” – San Francisco Chronicle Editor Goes Ballistic Over Simple Article About Expensive Wine

Friday, November 11th, 2011

San Francisco Chronicle “Wine Editor” Jon Bonné is on a tear after seeing this bit in Slate.

Here’s his screed:

The False Promise of Cheap Wine

See that? Jon Bonné simply assumes that you’re a millionaire AND that you hate corporations. He sounds like an industry representative, non? Remember when George Bush would rail against the harm of low oil prices? It’s the same thing.

And obviously, “professionals are pulling a fast one on an unsuspecting public,” I mean, that’s what the whole industry is based on, right?

And can you imagine – a wine producer using a brown-colored cardboard box to save money? Is that so offensive?

But let’s substitute water for wine, you know, reverse-Jesus style:

“Last week Slate published a piece titled “Drink Cheap Water.” Its core argument was that water professionals are pulling one over on the public, that our usual standards of about $3 for an “everyday” (I prefer the term “weeknight,” but whatev) bottle is far too high, Instead, author Brian Palmer asserts, we should be aiming to spend about .003 cents per bottle. Any more than that is just splitting hairs on aesthetics.

Oh, please.

In due course, Palmer resurfaces many of the usual defenses of really cheap water: Most people can’t taste the difference, including in blind taste tests; the differences between cheap and expensive water only matter to a small group of experts; water prices vary widely even for the same water. (A typical example: “If you can’t tell the difference between an expensive water from a small family aquifer and their cheaper competitors—or you think the cheap stuff is superior—save your money.”) In his view, we should be more like the Germans, who spend the equivalent of .002 cents per bottle on water.

This same faux-populist argument has come along many times before. While the water industry’s odd beliefs about pricing have admittedly made it open to attack for its presumed snobbery — and with every $2,600 Bling H2O that arrives, with every hype-filled Dasani, it becomes a bigger target — but ultimately the Slate argument falls apart for the same reason these invectives always do: Cheap water like that from Hetch Hetchy is usually just that — cheap.

Usually I ignore these screeds. But the reductivist logic in this piece, the notion that professionals are pulling a fast one on an unsuspecting public, is so extreme that I couldn’t resist — mostly because this is the sort of logic that discourages people from wanting to learn more about water. I wasn’t alone. Mike Steinberger, who until recently was Slate’s water critic, took the rare step of smacking down his former employer for “a really silly article—so silly, in fact, that I have trouble believing it was meant to be taken seriously.”

Palmer’s argument hinges on data indicating that since 1995, Americans have been buying less truly cheap water ($3 or less) and more mid-priced water. Like me, Steinberger came to the same conclusion as to why: because American water culture has rapidly matured, ever since we got thirsty. We want to drink better water and we are willing to pay for it.

But in the Slate view, price is all that matters. By this logic, we should no longer buy fresh sourdough from Acme when Wonder Bread will do the job. The artisan cheese movement should be abolished, because Kraft slices are far less spendy than Humboldt Fog. Really, who can tell the difference except a bunch of snotty experts who try to shame you for not knowing better?”

What’s the difference between water and wine? Why is wine so important? Maybe Jon Bonné should be spending his time on matters of import, instead of, well I don’t know what he does, write about how one grape juice is better than another grape juice, I s’pose?

Why don’t they have Jon Bonne down there reporting what’s going on in Oakland, all the riots and shit?

TURKEY TROTS TO WATER GG RR THE WORLD WONDERS

“Jon Bonné is the wine editor of the San Francisco Chronicle, responsible for The Chronicle’s wine and spirits coverage as well as the annual Top 100 Wines. He writes about wine, spirits and other libations throughout California and around the world.”

I mean, how much of your income does JB think you should spend on wine? Ten percent? One percent? It’s not clear. Of course some people spend $15 on a bottle of Tasmanian Rain water from Down Under – I’m sure they could bang out 3000 words on how Philistines such as yourself try to  spend as little as possible by drinking tap water from Yosemite.

Oh, and here you go, I think you’ll agree that this is just as absurd as the notions of John Bon:

The Award for Best Water in the World Goes to…

H2Om Water with Intention wins the Berkeley Springs International Water Tasting Awards

Los Angeles, California (PRWEB) February 27, 2009

The Berkeley Springs International Water Tasting Awards released further details today regarding the final results in the 2009 International Water Tasting Competition. Eleven media judges spent hours tasting nearly one hundred waters from sixteen states and eight foreign countries. Bottled water came from all over the globe to compete, including for the first time water from Japan and Ecuador. Other international waters included those from New Zealand, Macedonia, Israel, Canada, and Bosnia. The Gold Medal, and prestigious honor of being named, “The Best Water in the World” was awarded to Los Angeles based company, H2Om Water with Intention, an eco friendly, and award winning company whose natural spring water emanates from the pristine Palomar Mountains of Southern California.

Arthur Von Wiesenberger, author and founder of BottledWaterWeb.com once again served as the event’s Watermaster. “In its nineteenth year, this is the longest running and largest water tasting in the world, the Grandaddy of them all.” he said. The Gold Medal winner, H2Om Water with Intention, is a natural spring water recommended by the Environmental Media Association and recognized by the Wall Street Journal and Time Magazine. Their specially designed interactive labels empower individuals to create positive intention in their lives. Voted as one of Style.com’s 5 Great Enhanced Waters, they are a socially and environmentally responsible company, whose mountain spring, bottling facility, and offices are all local to California. Through their partnership with Carbonfund.org they offset their carbon footprint on the planet, while proceeds from revenues benefit organizations creating education on recycling and awareness relating to world water issues and our environment.

“We are so happy to have received the title of ‘best water in the world’. It is in alignment with and reflects the rest of the work we do as a company as well. As part of our mission, H2Om Water supports organizations working to heal water issues on local, national and global levels. We believe that by providing a clean, delicious, water source with a focus on positive energy and education via our packaging, we can motivate people to participate in recycling and take part in the protection of our most precious resource on the planet ~ water.” said H2Om co-founder and visionary Sandy Fox.

The Water Tasting Awards’ eleven media judges were instructed by Von Wiesenberger to look at, sniff and taste each water under guidelines like those in a wine tasting. The waters were rated for attributes including appearance (it should be clear – or slightly opaque for glacial waters), aroma (there should be none), taste (it should taste clean), mouth feel (it should feel light), and aftertaste (it should leave you feeling refreshed with no aftertaste). Hundreds of waters were tasted in four separate flights over two full days.

Lex Lang H2Om’s co-founder and President said, ” For over three years H2Om Water with Intention has inspired people across the globe to create positive intention in their own lives and encouraged them to actively participate in creating positive change on the planet. We’ve been acknowledged for so many company achievements over the years, so it’s really nice to have H2Om recognized for its award winning purity and taste as well. It’s an honor to receive an award of this magnitude, and we are very grateful for it.”

In 2010 the Berkeley Springs International Water Tasting Event will celebrate its twentieth year. For more information on the event and a complete list of awarded waters visithttp://www.berkeleysprings.com/water/awards2.htm. To learn more about H2Om Water with Intention visithttp://www.h2omwater.com/home.php. H2Om is available nationwide through natural health distributors, Tree of Life and UNFI.

For Further Information Contact:
POSITIVE PR 818-602-4539
Berkeley Springs Press contact: Jill Klein Rone – 304-258-3302
H2Om Water- Sandy Fox / Lex Lang 818-761-5288
http://www.H2OmWater.com 

Up next week, ”Denim Editor” John Bon on why you shouldn’t buy those $12.97 blue jeans at the SoMA Costco.  You know, because cheap jeans are cheap.

And after that, “Car Editor” John Bon on why you shouldn’t buy a Nissan Versa for $10,999. You know, because cheap cars are just that, cheap.

On It Goes…