Posts Tagged ‘eir’

Simple-Minded Columnist C.W. Nevius Weighs In: “Is HDTV competition worth 4-foot U-verse boxes?”

Thursday, April 21st, 2011

So let’s see here, U-Verse (short for universe, or universal, or whatnot, manifestly) is a weird name, apparently, but “Nevius,” that’s not weird at all. That’s one lesson you can learn today from the most simple-mindedest writer on staff at the Chronicle.

And you can get some quotes from one of the horrible, money-hungry NIMBYs over at SF Beautiful.

Now, the Comcast monopoly sucks, non? (And actually, you can live without cable or satelite TV, anyway, if you want.)

All right, here’s a retread from before. Enjoy:

Here’s what you do, just surf on over to ipnetwork4sf.att.com to see what AT&T has in store for San Francisco. They want to bring fiber optics closer to your house so that you can join the 21st century, access-to-data-wise. They call it U-verse and a couple thousand people in town already use it for high speed internet and wireless and television and phone and whatnot.

The thing is that AT&T needs to put “street cabinetry” all over the 415 to make it all work and they only put in 14 boxes before giving up the effort in 2008. But they’re back now  for another try. They told me all about it over turkey samwiches the other day at that building they share with the Twitter in the SoMA. But everything they talked about is on the new website, they’ve even got a blog.

The site allows recent arrivals to SF to vent:

We’ll do whatever it takes to get U-Verse to our neighborhood here in the Outer Sunset. Every single night, we shake our fists at our current Comcast DVR and yell, “WE MISS OUR U-VERSE!”

O.K. then. Anyway, AT&T’s Marc Blakeman is standing by to hear what you have to say or schedule a meeting about where to put the boxes or whatever. He’s already met with 45 groups this go-around, so why not you or your group too?

(Oh, and don’t ask about what it takes to bury these things – you don’t want to know. The hole they have to dig and air-condition and whatnot is bigger than your apartment.)

We were supposed to be the first city to get this stuff and now we’re one of the last. Oh well.

Get all the deets at the special AT&T site.

And here’s the FAQ to get you started:

How does the system work today?
What’s new in the network upgrade?
What government approvals must AT&T obtain to install these additional cabinets?
What happens after the CEQA Review?
What is the scope of the build?
Why 726 cabinets and how does that compare to the last CEQA application AT&T made in 2008?
What is the size of the cabinets and what do they look like?
What color are these cabinets? Can they be painted a different color?
Can the cabinets be buried?
How will AT&T handle graffiti on the boxes?
What about permits that AT&T already had in process before withdrawing their CEQA application in 2008?
Will AT&T provide any landscaping or screening around the boxes to soften their appearance?
How will I know if a cabinet is being located near my home or business?
Do the cabinets make a sound?
How is it determined where to place the new cabinets?
How is AT&T informing the community of its network upgrade plans?
How does the DPW permitting process work?
When will AT&T begin applying for permits with the San Francisco Department of Public Works?

They’re Ba-aack! AT&T is Back to Bring Fiber Optic IP Networking to SF – 700 Street Cabinets Planned – New Website

Thursday, November 18th, 2010

Here’s what you do, just surf on over to ipnetwork4sf.att.com to see what AT&T has in store for San Francisco. They want to bring fiber optics closer to your house so that you can join the 21st century, access-to-data-wise. They call it U-verse and a couple thousand people in town already use it for high speed internet and wireless and television and phone and whatnot.

The thing is that AT&T needs to put “street cabinetry” all over the 415 to make it all work and they only put in 14 boxes before giving up the effort in 2008. But they’re back now  for another try. They told me all about it over turkey samwiches the other day at that building they share with the Twitter in the SoMA. But everything they talked about is on the new website, they’ve even got a blog.

The site allows recent arrivals to SF to vent:

We’ll do whatever it takes to get U-Verse to our neighborhood here in the Outer Sunset. Every single night, we shake our fists at our current Comcast DVR and yell, “WE MISS OUR U-VERSE!”

O.K. then. Anyway, AT&T’s Marc Blakeman is standing by to hear what you have to say or schedule a meeting about where to put the boxes or whatever. He’s already met with 45 groups this go-around, so why not you or your group too?

(Oh, and don’t ask about what it takes to bury these things – you don’t want to know. The hole they have to dig and air-condition and whatnot is bigger than your apartment.)

We were supposed to be the first city to get this stuff and now we’re one of the last. Oh well.

Get all the deets at the special AT&T site.

And here’s the FAQ to get you started:

How does the system work today?
What’s new in the network upgrade?
What government approvals must AT&T obtain to install these additional cabinets?
What happens after the CEQA Review?
What is the scope of the build?
Why 726 cabinets and how does that compare to the last CEQA application AT&T made in 2008?
What is the size of the cabinets and what do they look like?
What color are these cabinets? Can they be painted a different color?
Can the cabinets be buried?
How will AT&T handle graffiti on the boxes?
What about permits that AT&T already had in process before withdrawing their CEQA application in 2008?
Will AT&T provide any landscaping or screening around the boxes to soften their appearance?
How will I know if a cabinet is being located near my home or business?
Do the cabinets make a sound?
How is it determined where to place the new cabinets?
How is AT&T informing the community of its network upgrade plans?
How does the DPW permitting process work?
When will AT&T begin applying for permits with the San Francisco Department of Public Works?

Supervisor Eric Mar Hosts Geary Bus Rapid Transit Meeting Tonight in the Richmond

Monday, July 27th, 2009

Freshman San Francisco  Supervisor Eric Mar is hosting yet another meeting of concern to residents of the Richmond District. The Geary BRT is a coming – are you on board? Express Yourself tonight at 7:00 PM. Deets below.

The Mayor of the Richmond District, in action:

img_6143-copy2

Geary Corridor Transportation Improvements to Be the Focus of Community Meeting
Public meeting co-hosted by Supervisor Mar and San Francisco County Transportation Authority will feature Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) project update

Who:  Supervisor Eric Mar, San Francisco County Transportation Authority, San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency
What:  Geary Corridor Transportation-Focused Community Meeting and Open House
When:  Monday, July 27, 2009
7:00pm – 9:00pm
 
Where:  Richmond Recreation Center
251 18th Avenue

San Francisco, CA 94199

      Supervisor Eric Mar and the San Francisco County Transportation Authority will co-host a community meeting to discuss the progress of the GearyCorridor Bus Rapid Transit Environmental Impact Report/Statement (EIR/EIS), among other transportation improvements under consideration for the thoroughfare.  The Authority and the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency (SFMTA) are well underway with the Geary BRT environmental review process and are seeking public feedback on the analysis of changes in traffic and parking conditions, construction strategies, as well as pedestrian and streetscape enhancements that would be part of the BRT project.  Agency staff also will be on hand to discuss related Geary corridor improvements, including the Mid-Richmond Traffic Calming Project.

      Following up on the Geary BRT public scoping sessions held in December 2008, this community meeting will provide an opportunity for neighbors, business owners, and transit users to discuss the benefits and potential impacts of the project under consideration.  The Authority hopes to finalize the Geary BRT EIR/EIS in 2010.  For more information about the Geary BRT effort, visit www.GearyBRT.org.

Nimbies Save Presidio’s Great Northern Parking Lot – Will Burger King Now Come Back?

Thursday, July 2nd, 2009

Boy, it was touch and go for a few years there, but news comes today that our beloved NIMBYs have managed to preserve the Great Northern Parking Lot of San Francisco.

See it? 700 spaces, free of charge. It’s historic, you know. When the U.S. Army wasn’t out there killing a million or so Filipinos it managed to create the GNPLoSF. Therefore, these parking spaces are sacrosanct:

img_5582-copy

Now that that pesky modern art has been gotten rid of, a question remains over what to do with the upper end of the Main Post. You know the Burger King corporation had an outlet that served as an Army Mess on the Presidio for so many years, it would be only fitting to give it the right of first refusal to get a chance to replace the famous itty bitty bowling alley that’s up there now.  

An artist’s conception, avec just one installation of evil modern art thrown in to see if the NIMBYs can tolerate it.  

museum-fisher copy

You see, that old, historic Presidio BK was a place “where a simple guy serving his country could get an inexpensive meal with a stunning view.” Wouldn’t it be nice to honor those memories with the biggest Burger King in the world? Put it right where the museum was supposed to go.

Either that, or a Jollibee. Your choice.

The Pros and Cons of Progress at the Presidio Main Post – A Kind of Dialogue

Wednesday, May 27th, 2009

This recent post here regarding the Presidio inspired a correspondent to take pen to paper (so to speak) and leave a comment. Below are the words of “PresidioPal” along with some queries. (Surprisingly, he’s not a NIMBY.) Anyway, enjoy.

The mighty, historic Great Parking Lot of the Presidio is jeopardized by the Main Post Plan. The Presidio Trust just might unpave this paradise and put up a…lawn. Heaven forfend. What happened was the Army put it in and then left. Are we bound to have it forever?

Says PP:

“If we are talking about the “decay” of the historic character of the Presidio, which is a rare national historic landmarks district chosen for the layer upon layer of American history visible on Main Post…”

What does that mean to people – landmark status? Why should people care about this? The historic character of the South was Jim Crow laws (not that we didn’t have James Crow laws outside the South, but that’s another story)  - would the “historic character” argument be useful for maintaining segregation? Would you like to turn the Presidio itself into a museum, where nothing ever changes? Isn’t it an underpopulated Land of Wind and Ghosts now?

“…the Fisher art museum…”

Isn’t the name of the proposed museum Contemporary Art Museum of the Presidio (CAMP). Isn’t it specifically not called The Fisher? Isn’t that one of its selling points? Isn’t it going to have like a “b” as in boy billion dollars of art in it or something, that’s not otherwise available for public view?

  ”…a hotel…”

Or lodge, some people are calling it a lodge, in keeping with the whole “park” theme of the Presidio. What’s wrong with a lodge in a park?

“and a modern movie house”

Or “modernized,” I’ll give you that. Didn’t it used to seat something like 1000 GIs back in the day? Do you think your millionaire NIMBY allies would like to have all those blue-collar types back in the Presidio in “their neighborhood” near the houses they inherited from their parents fair and square? Isn’t it true that the Presidio Theatre seats zero people today and that’s the way the owners of competing theatres in San Francisco like it? Isn’t it true theater owners kicked in money to oppose the Main Post Plan because they don’t want competition? Is that a good reason to oppose opening up a small three-screener that would seat far fewer people than the 1000 it was built for back in the day?

“…ADD to the “decay” by introducing non-historic elements that detract from the historic site itself…”

Does the non-historic TransAmerica pyramid detract from historic San Francisco? Should nothing ever change in town? Did a collection of histrionic societies, millionaire NIMBYs and movie theatre owners object to the Louvre Pyramid in Cour Napolean? Probably, but isn’t the pyramid a good thing, despite its “non-historic” status?

“If you take “decay” to mean delaying needed repairs to historic structures, the new buildings have nothing to do with that.”

You and your NIMBY allies are fighting for the status quo, whether you realize it or not. Congress, in its wisdom, could have put your organization in charge of the entire Presidio. It didn’t though, right? Do you acknowledge that?  Why should anybody pay attention to your unfunded mandates? Your half-baked if-we-had-some-ham-we-could-have-a-ham-sandwich, if-we-also-had-some-bread-but-only-if-five-million-dollars-fell-from-the-sky alternative plans? Back in the 1990s, Congress did something quite unique with the Presidio. Of course, it could have sold off a lot of land to condo developers. Would you prefer that?  

“Let’s get it straight, the proposal is for three major new structures in a national historic landmark.”

Is that really an argument? Shouldn’t you go further and explain why people should care about national historic landmark status? And actually, it’s more than three structures, but I get what you mean. Is the 700-car parking lot historic? Was the Burger King historic? Should we bring it back to honor the military?

“Why not a contemporary museum on Alamo Square?”

The reason why is that millionaire NIMBYs and the Planning Commission would tear that one apart. That’s the short answer.

If I had any advice for the Main Post, it would be this – lively up yourself, mon! This may or may not happen, depending upon the lawyers, the judges and the juries associated with the forthcoming lawsuits. 

We’ll see.

The Presidio: Public Comment Period for the Main Post Update Ends June 1st

Tuesday, May 26th, 2009

The Presidio Trust has just announced a last call for comments about ending the arrested decay of the Presidio Main Post – so finish up your drinks and get your comments in by June 1, 2009.

END OF THE PUBLIC COMMENT PERIOD

June 1, 2009 is the end of public comment period for several key documents related to the Main Post planning process. Three draft documents have been circulating for public comment since February 27, 2009:

1. Revised Draft Main Post Update
2. Draft Supplement to the Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) for the Preferred Alternative
3. Revised Draft Finding of Effect

The Revised Draft Main Post Update reflects the land uses and improvements the Presidio Trust intends to pursue to re-establish the Main Post as the heart of the park. Through the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, the Trust identified a “preferred alternative” that is detailed in the Revised Update and analyzed in the Draft Supplement to the SEIS. The Revised Update is also analyzed as the “undertaking” in the Revised Draft Finding of Effect; prepared under the provisions of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) as part of the assessment phase of the Section 106 consultation.

In June 2008, the Trust released an earlier draft of the Main Post Update and a Draft SEIS which analyzed a range of alternatives. An earlier Draft Finding of Effect was released in August 2008, which analyzed the effects on historic resources of all the alternatives that were presented in the Draft SEIS. All documents can be found on the Trust’s website: www.presidio.gov.

Comments will be accepted on all documents, both current and past drafts. Commentators are free to organize their comments in any way they choose. They may comment separately on the different documents, or address all documents at one time. Commentators are also welcome to address specific issues or comment on specific proposals. The Trust will consider and respond to comments on all of the drafts when developing the final documents.

NEXT STEPS

NHPA Section 106 Consultation: Finalizing the Finding of Effect and Resolving Adverse Effects
A Final Finding of Effect will be issued early this summer, formally completing the assessment phase of the Section 106 consultation under the NHPA. The Historic Resources section of the Final SEIS will be consistent with the Final Finding of Effect. The Final Finding of Effect will be available on the Trust’s website and will be sent to all consulting parties.

The next phase of the Section 106 consultation process is the resolution phase during which consulting parties identify ways to avoid, minimize, or mitigate the effects presented in the Finding of Effect. The resolution phase results in an agreement document that establishes parameters for how projects can proceed. A schedule for the remainder of the Section 106 consultation will be issued to all consulting parties early in June.

NEPA: Finalizing the SEIS and Main Post Update
Over the course of the summer, the Trust will finalize the environmental review, issuing a Final SEIS and Final Main Post Update sometime in the fall. The Final SEIS includes a response to all comments. A notice of availablity will be issued once the final documents are released. The final documents will also be available on the Trust’s website. After the final environmental documents are issued, a 30-day no action period ensues.

Record of Decision
The Trust will issue a Record of Decision (ROD) only after both the NEPA and NHPA processes are completed. The ROD memorializes the decision made by the Presidio Trust Board of Directors and clearly articulates the actions that the Trust will pursue in the Main Post and the reasoning behind the Trust’s decision. Once the ROD is adopted, the Final Main Post Update will amend the Presidio Trust Management Plan for the Main Post District.

New Bike Lanes on JFK in GGP, 133 Parking Spaces Gone, Hearing May 29th

Friday, May 22nd, 2009

Well look what just sprouted up in Golden Gate Park - PUBLIC HEARING notices like the one you see below. So, it looks like DPT ORDER No. 3619, adopted just four days ago, will be the subject of a hearing at City Hall on Friday, May 29, 2009.

Here’s the upshot – three miles of bike lanes are going in (that’s both ways on JFK Drive from Park Presidio (basically) for almost a mile and a half to the Stanyan, Oak, Fell, Kezar area where the Panhandle starts (basically), so that means 133 parking spaces are coming out.

Click to expand.

That’s the best I can figure, anyway. (I’m not too good at this legal stuff, took the LSAT, got a 48, srsly.)

Take a look at what part of JFK looks like now. Cyclists compete with (legally and illegally) parked vehicles – sometimes they are forced into the “designated lane for cars.” It’s sort of a mess.

Project 7-4 John F. Kennedy Drive Bicycle Lanes, Kezar to Transverse Drives
This project would involve the installation of Class II bicycle lanes [which means a regular bike lane with stripes on both sides] in both directions on John F. Kennedy Drive from Kezar Drive to Transverse Drive in Golden Gate Park. This project would add Class II bicycle lanes… by narrowing existing travel lanes. A limited number of parking spaces would be removed along portions of John F. Kennedy Drive where the narrowing of travel lanes would not provide sufficient space to add Class II bicycle lanes.

Here’s the proposal in four pages of pdf. If you add up the numbers in the handwritten notes, you should get 133 parking spaces removed. (I guess that’s a “limited number.”) Here’s the San Francisco Bicycle Coalition‘s take, on this page here:

Description of project

This is Project 7.4 in the Bike Plan EIR:

John F. Kennedy Drive Bicycle Lanes, Kezar to Transverse Drives

MTA’s Project Description as analyzed in the Bike Plan EIR (Acrobat PDF file)

This project is an element of SF Bike Route 30.

Project Designs and Drawings

MTA’s project material (Acrobat PDF files):

Will Norman Mailer, seen here illegally blocking the current “bike lane” in front of the Conservatory of Flowers, soon be parking his tour bus on top of the new and improved bike lanes?

 

Only Time Will Tell.

Presidio Update: Two More Open Houses Announced – Public Comment Ends June 1

Monday, May 11th, 2009

Your Presidio Trust has just announced another two Open House sessions concerning the Main Post. Make note of the location at Building 105, that Brokedown Palace (but I can assure you that parts of it are excellent). It’s sandwiched between Lincoln (no, not THAT Lincoln), Taylor (no, not THAT Taylor) and Montgomery (no, not THAT Montgomery). Just pop open the Google Map here. See? It’s right near where the Google Maps car got busted (or not, if you believe a certain U.S. Park Police Sargeant, who, really, oughta know).

Just get to the Building 104 Mouse House and then go downhill a skosh. There’s probably not going to be a program or anything – just drop by and yickety yack a bit… 

Main Post Open House with Presidio Trust Staff
Monday, May 18, 9 to 11 am
&
Wednesday, May 20, 6 to 8 pm
Main Post Information Center, 105 Montgomery Street

There’s always room for one more:

“Please join us for informal “open house” sessions at which Presidio Trust staff members will be available to respond to questions about proposed projects for the Main Post as well as questions about historic resources, transportation and parking, visitor use , and environmental sustainability. The public comment period for Main Post planning ends on June 1, 2009. Comments may be emailed to mainpost@presidiotrust.gov.”

Mercedes-Driving NIMBYs Pack Presidio Trust Transportation Workshop

Tuesday, April 28th, 2009

As promised, the Presidio Trust Main Post Planning Transportation Workshop went off on April 22, 2009. Look here later on to see when and if two more similar meetings will occur in the very merry month of May. (The first should deal with historic resources and the other is slated to be a kind of catch-all open-mike night.) 

122 souls sat through a presentation of answers to a dozen key questions that people have been asking about concerning transportation – signalization, fees for parking, traffic loads, etc. I vowed to leave as soon as the public speakers veered off-topic – that took about ten seconds, so oh well. Regardless, this appeared to be a more-productive-than-average public yammer session. Assemblymember Tom Ammiano sent a representative (the well-informed Noriko Shinzato) as did Supervisor Michela Alioto-Pier, so it appears that interest in the plans for the Main Post remains strong.

Click to expand

Fully eleven Mercedes-Benzeses were out front, or in the lot up the hill, or in the overflow lot even further up the hill near the chapel. BMW was also well-repped, and there were a least three Porsches, including two expensive Porsche Cayenne minivans and one hepped-up Neunelfer.A richer group of parking-hungry NIMBYs would be hard to find. One bicycle.

All this Powerpoint stuff should be online in the near future, or maybe it already is.

Presidi-Go is already up to 300,000 trips per year.

Should the NIMBY’s, the people of means, be given more votes on this matter than tourists from Tempe? Only Time Will Tell. 

So there you have it, To Be Continued.

Presidio Update: Main Post Planning Transportation Workshop Set for April 22nd

Tuesday, April 14th, 2009

The Presidio Trust has replaced the cancelled April 16 meeting with a Transportation Workshop at 6:30 PM on April 22, 2009. There will be an overview of the transit issues being analyzed through the Main Post planning process, and staff will be on hand to answer questions about transportation issues. 

Main Post Planning Workshop: Transportation
Wednesday, April 22, 6:30 p.m.
Golden Gate Club, 135 Fisher Loop

Some drivers strongly oppose losing this gigantic, historic 700-car parking lot:

Oh well.

How will the NIMBYs get to this meeting about having too many cars in the Presidio?

A short, pleasant evening stroll? No.

Or perhaps a bike ride? No.

Guess again!