Posts Tagged ‘emergency’

Oh Hell Yes: UCSF Allows Emergency Room Check-In Online – Wait Just 15 Minutes with InQuickER Service at Parnassus

Tuesday, July 26th, 2011

The average wait for an emergency room visit at UCSF‘s Parnassus Heights campus is 4.5 hours for people with mild medical emergencies? Wow.

Wouldn’t it be nicer to pay $5 to check-in online and then wait at home rather than in the ER?

That’s what UCSF thinks.

Check it:

“UCSF patients with minor medical needs seeking treatment in the Emergency Department now can make an appointment to be seen – waiting at home rather in the hospital – via a new online check-in service called InQuickER.

UCSF Medical Center
UCSF Medical Center is now offering patients with mild medical emergencies a chance to reserve a time to be seen in the Emergency Department using a new online system.

UCSF Medical Center’s Emergency Department (ED) at Parnassus Heights is now offering InQuickER designed for patients with non-threatening minor medical needs.

UCSF patients can register online for a $4.99 fee and pick an open slot for an emergency room visit. The fee will be refunded if they’re not seen within 15 minutes.

In April, UCSF did a trial run with the online service, which 22 people used. UCSF Medical Center launched the system a few weeks ago.

“One thing we encountered during the trial was that a lot of patients were using it inappropriately,” said Jennifer Dearman, the Emergency Department’s patient care manager. “The online registration is screened by ED nurses and we have had to advise some patients to come directly to the ED. This service is for a fast-track kind of patient.”

“For example, a cancer patient on chemotherapy with a fever can have complicated issues and should be seen in the regular ED, so InQuickER is not appropriate for that person.”

Waiting at Home vs. Hospital

About 105 patients a day visit the emergency room at UCSF Medical Center on the Parnassus campus, Dearman said, and the average time between arrival and departure, for those not admitted to the hospital, is four-and-a-half hours.

That’s in keeping with the average wait in 2009 for ER patients throughout California: four hours and 34 minutes –  27 minutes longer than the U.S. average, according to a 2010 report by health care consulting firm Press Ganey.

Dearman said patient satisfaction was the main reason UCSF Medical Center adopted InQuickER. “It also helps us control the flow,” she said. “The general population doesn’t think the emergency room ever has slow times. But it does.”

UCSF is one of 55 health care facilities in 13 states partnering with InQuickER, said spokesman Chris Song. The service, based in Nashville, began in 2006 after its founder, Tyler Kiley, had to go to an emergency room and spent hours witnessing stasis and frustration.

“He just thought there had to be a better way,” Song said. “With our service, you still have to wait but you get to do it somewhere else. Like on your couch instead of being surrounded by other sick people.”

Song said InQuickerER provides patients with convenience, comfort and some level of control. And it allows emergency department staff to know who’s coming and what symptoms they have, so that they can better prepare.

“It can help reduce the burden of peak times and spread it out,” Song said. “It creates more efficiency and a better environment in the waiting room.”

So far, more than 10,000 people have used the service; 95 percent have been seen within the 15-minute window. In a triage situation, of course, even people who have registered will have to wait. When there are delays, users are notified through text messages and emails with updated projections on treatment times.

The service is available online at https://ucsfmedicalcenter.inquicker.com/. It is growing rapidly, Song said, which is not surprising: A study led by San Francisco General Hospital emergency physician Renee Hsia, MD, MSc, found that the number of hospital-based emergency departments in the United States is declining, despite an increase in the number of patients seeking emergency care.

The study by Hsia, an assistant professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine in the UCSF School of Medicine, was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association in May. It reported that 27 percent of urban and suburban emergency rooms have closed in the last two decades.”

Hurray!

How Jumbo is Too Jumbo? Airbus A380, SFO’s New Loadstar Aircraft, Bumps into Stuff Once Again

Monday, June 20th, 2011

I’ll tell you, I have no objection in particular about Airbus A380 superjumbo jets flying into and out of SFO, but over the past few years the arrival of this a/c got oversold, way oversold, by SFO, the old mayor’s office and the new mayor’s office.

They went on and on about how farsighted SFO was to become “A380-ready,” but after these kinds of taxiway incidents worldwide, I gotta ask:

Where’s your Messiah now, SFO?

Oh, here it is, at the Paris Air Show, bumping into buildings ‘n stuff. Sacre Bleu – Une Autre Allision!

Click to expand – via Niek van der Zande

(Don’t call it a wing fence (or winglet or sharklet) the way some journalists do, oh no, call it a wingtip fence. Thusly: “The Superjumbo jet just lost another wingtip fence.)

The deets from Paris:

“While the crew had been informed that the taxiway was clear for the A380, said Airbus, and the aircraft was on the centreline, it hit a building belonging to Aeroports de Paris.”

Oh well.

Hey SFO, why don’t you actually do something by getting your runways farther apart so you’ll be future-ready instead of just A380-ready?

Just asking, SFO Bro.

SFO’s New Terminal Two is Just an Another Airport Terminal, SFO’s New Air France A380 Jet is Just Another Jet

Tuesday, April 12th, 2011

Is new Terminal 2 at SFO really set to “dazzle?

Sadly no. It’s just another airport terminal right? Let’s keep things in sperpective.

The other dazzling piece of news coming up from Millbrae is Air France saying it will fly in an A380 superjumbo daily from gay Paris during Tourist Season 2011.

The best guess is that the A380 burns about 3% per passenger less than the slightly smaller competition from Boeing. Is that something to get excited about? Not really.

Oh, here we go, here’s an Air France Airbus A380 making friends in New Yawk just yesterday. What a bully! (The YouTube view count  just went from 303 views five minutes ago up to 17,000, so let’s call that going viral.)

Click to expand

Them A380’s are big, non?

Let’s hope that SFO can manage these big rigs better than JFK!

Anyway, to review, SFO’s New Terminal Two is Just an Another Airport Terminal, SFO’s New Air France A380 Jet is Just Another Jet.

No alarms, no surprises…

“Air France Flight 7 F-HPJD bound for Paris, was taxiing on a runway when its left wingtip struck the tail of Comair Flight 6293, which had just landed from Boston and was taxiing to its gate at Kennedy, one of the nation’s busiest airports…”

Don’t be Such an Emo – Get Out and Celebrate the Giant EMO Buttons of Lucasfilm, Letterman Digital Arts Center!

Tuesday, March 22nd, 2011

What would you make of things if you were hanging out in the Presidio and came across this giant cartoonish button?

You’d get on the Yelp and award Five Stars, as so many others have done before you.

Check out what Serge has to say:

“YES! I am glad that I was not the only one to notice this.  First time I walked around the Letterman Digital Arts Center these buttons stood out like a sore emo thumb.  Has anyone ever pressed one? Will the creek flood with emo kids? Will the water run red from razor cut wrists? Will a dark cloud cover the park as the trees die and pigeons turn to black crows?  WHO KNOWS!”

Via A.J.

Bon courage, giant cartoonish EMO buttons of the Presidio!

Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger Announces the California Disaster Corps

Friday, June 25th, 2010

Looks like Arnold is doing something besides those photo-ops these days.  

Not that he’s not good at photo-ops, like this one from a few years back. Anyway, here’s what he’s up to today:

Governor Schwarzenegger Launches First-in-the-Nation Disaster Corps

LOS ANGELES, June 25 — Governor Schwarzenegger today launched the first-in-the-nation Disaster Corps to professionalize, standardize and coordinate highly trained disaster volunteers statewide. Disaster Corps volunteers will be registered by their local government organization under the Disaster Service Worker Volunteer Program and will meet Disaster Corps training, typing, certification and security screening guidelines.

“California is always leading the way and now we are the first state in the nation to integrate volunteers into our state emergency plan,” said Governor Schwarzenegger. “Volunteers are an incredible resource, and no state has more giving, more passionate or more dedicated volunteers than California. Together, we will take volunteerism to a whole new level and make California better prepared and better equipped than ever before, for any emergency.”

In the aftermath of the 2007 Southern California Wildfires and Cosco Busan Oil Spill, thousands of disaster volunteers poured into affected areas to assist with evacuations, sheltering, clean-up and a host of other activities supporting response operations. Governor Schwarzenegger recognized the need to more effectively integrate and coordinate disaster volunteer efforts in all phases of emergency management, from disaster preparedness to disaster response and recovery. In February 2008, Governor Schwarzenegger appointed Karen Baker to serve as the state’s and also the nation’s first secretary of Service and Volunteering and charged her office with the development of the Disaster Corps.

All the deets, after the jump

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Ocean Beach Erosion Town Hall Meeting Tonight at the Great Highway’s Park Chalet

Monday, January 25th, 2010

Our neighbors in the Great Sand Waste* of the Outside Lands are having a little trouble with the partial collapse of the Great Highway near Sloat, so there’ll be a meeting tonight at 7:00 PM:

“A community meeting is being held on Monday, January 25th at 7:00 PM at the Park Chalet (located behind the Beach Chalet at 1000 Great Highway just south of Fulton in San Francisco) to discuss the proposed actions at Sloat Boulevard. The DPW Project Manager, Frank Filice will be there to discuss the emergency declaration, the short-term strategy, and a process for a long-term solution. Everyone who has an interest in the preservation and the future of Ocean Beach is encouraged to attend. The emergency declaration will go before the San Francisco Board of Supervisors for ratification the following day, Tuesday, January 26th.”

Will San Francisco “armor the beach or something? Stay tuned…

by k. riccitiello

If that doesn’t float your boat, there’s always, this:

“The Park Chalet will be offering $2 pints and extending their $5 happy hour menu of appetizers all night for the event.”

See you there.

*Look at this – snark from 160 years ago: The True Story of How San Francisco Received Its Name:

“San Francisco – this is a derivative word from sand and Francisco. In the early settlement of this country it was the custom of an old monk of the interior, by the name of Jeremiah Francisco, to perform a pilgrimage to this place every month, to visit the tomb of a brother of the order whose remains he had here interred. The wind “blew like mad” here, and upon his return he was usually so covered with the dust and sand, that his neighbors were unable to recognize him; hence they soon began to call him sand Francisco.

On one of his pilgrimages he happened, by mistake, to die here, and the place ever after was called by his name. From the difficulty of enunciating the d, it was usually called SAN FRANCISCO, and has so continued to this day. The present popular notion that the place was named after the St. Francis Hotel is an error!

California Weekly Courier
August 1, 1850″

The “Co-Owner” of a Local Flying School Threatens This Very Blog

Tuesday, December 15th, 2009

Read below to see the message that came over the transom of this little blog yesterday, the very blog you’re looking at right now. It concerns a post from a year and half ago about an airplane crash-landing that resulted in no major injuries

The missive, in its entirety: 

“When you google Flying Vikings your false article comes up. If you do not fix your false statements. I will deal with you. My name is Celine Correa and I am a co-owner of Flying Vikings. You need to report on the many thousands and thousands of flight hours we have done. Call me and I will give you verifiable details no false hoods. You need to correct your article immediately.
 
Celine”

O.K. fine. If anybody wants to go through and find any of the purported “false statements,” well then have at it – that would help me out.

Otherwise, I don’t think I’ll be “reporting” on Flying Vikings’ “many thousands and thousands of flight hours” (is that a lot? My dad, currently pushing up daisies in Virginia, had five figures worth of flying hours with no accidents, AFAIK) in some sort of fairness-doctrine type of deal.

The comments are open on this post, if anyone wants to pipe up. Thanks for your help.

Here it is: 

Another Accident Involving Hayward-based Flying Vikings, Inc.

Today’s headlines include news of the crash landing of a Flying Vikings, Inc. Cessna 172 in Oakland, California.

The San Jose Mercury News earlier reported that N61736 ”had a gas leak,” but now is going with ”mechanical problems” as the cause of this incident. KCBS, which labels this single engine plane the KCBS Radio Traffic Plane, is reporting the pilot claimed the oil pressure guage plummetted just before the engine conked out. This aircraft, built in 1974, suffered “substantial damage” during an incident in 1981.  

The following language, written before today’s accident, appears on the Flying Vikings website:

Since Flying Vikings also has a contract with local news gathering organizations, students are offered opportunities to build time that no other school can. Fly 3 to 6 hours a day and get paid.

A visual aid to help imagine yourself staring at a motionless propeller low over the Bay Area. Click to expand:

175264529_c84380bc84_o-copy.jpg

The dash of a Cessna 172 and a view of Candlestick Park, from the incredible Telstar Logistics Flickrstream

Here’s a photo of a different Flying Vikings aircraft, a Piper that suffered a fatal accident in 2006. Readers may find this link, relating to the Piper crash, of interest, however, it might lead you to unproven speculation about the cause of that tragedy.

The Federal Aviation Administration and Cal OSHA should be able to determine the cause of this forced landing fairly easily.

A relatively happy ending to a scary situation.

So that’s the purported “false article” from 2008.
 
Actually, the only reason I found this incident noteworthy at the time was the number of conflicting reports about the cause of  this incident. The National Transportation Safety Board investigated and concluded the problem was:
 
“A loss of engine power due to oil starvation. The oil starvation event was due to the failure of maintenance personnel to tighten the mounting bolts for the newly installed vacuum pump.”
 
Seems the pump had just been replaced three days earlier and the flight of June 30, 2008 was the first one using the new pump.
 
All the deets from the NTSB, after the jump.
 
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San Francisco to Test Sirens at 10:15 AM on Thursday, October 15th, 2009

Tuesday, October 13th, 2009

This is a test. Only a test.

Normally, you’d only hear these sirens on Tuesdays at noon. There’s no need for alarm.

Deets below.

IMG_9720-copy

CITYWIDE SIRENS TO SOUND AS PART OF EARTHQUAKE DRILL
What: The City’s Outdoor Public Warning System Sirens will be activated as part of the statewide Drop, Cover and Hold earthquake drill on October 15, 2009 at 10:15 am.  The sirens will be sounded, followed by a voice message indicating that it is a test.  This is the first time the City is utilizing the system citywide at a time other than the regular Tuesday noon weekly test.

San Francisco residents and visitors should not be alarmed by the fact that the sirens are sounding at a time other than the regular Tuesday test.

When: Thursday, October 15, 2009 at 10:15 am

Where: 92 locations citywide

Why:  The City is participating in the Great California ShakeOut, the statewide earthquake drill.  To date, more than 280,000 people in San Francisco have registered to participate in the drill, and more than 6.4 million have registered statewide.  For more information, please go to
www.shakeout.org/sanfrancisco.

San Francisco’s “Tuesday Noon Siren” Tests are Loudest in Chinatown

Saturday, August 22nd, 2009

You can set your watch every Tuesday at 12:00 PM in the City and County of San Francisco if you can hear the Tuesday Noon Siren Test.

In some other places it’s a little hard to notice, but these horns above Kearny and Washington must be the loudest in all Christendom.

IMG_9720 copy

See?

IMG_9717 copy

If this had been an actual emergency, a voice would have told you what’s up. Or, generally speaking, you might want to just hustle inside as soon as you figure out it’s not a test this time.

Read all about it:

The Tuesday Noon Siren

Every Tuesday at noon, San Francisco tests the Outdoor Warning System. During the test the siren emits a 15 second alert tone. In an actual emergency, the siren tone will cycle repeatedly for 5 minutes. Should you hear the sirens at any time other than Tuesday at noon, go indoors and immediately tune to a news source such as KCBS 740 AM, or other local media stations.

Learn more about the siren system at www.72hours.org, the San Francisco Office of Emergency Services & Homeland Security’s new website. Here you’ll find information on how to respond to specific types of emergencies, such as an Earthquake or a Tsunami, and easy steps to help you develop your own emergency plan.

In a major disaster it might be 3 days before vital services are restored.
When you hear the Tuesday Noon Siren, it’s your weekly reminder to make an emergency plan, build an emergency supply kit and be prepared to be self sufficient for 72 hours.

Call 811 Before You Dig – Plus What About N11 Codes 211, 311, 411, 511, 611, 711 and 911?

Tuesday, March 31st, 2009

Your local gas and electric utility monopoly would like you to think before you dig. PG&E reminds us all today to call 811 at least two days before you start digging around, else you might hit a gas main and blow yourself to kingdom come. Some local folks will answer the phone and check things out for you and what’s wrong with that?

But what about all the other x11 telephone services – they are starting to add up huh? Let’s learn about them below.

 

Here there are, all the N11 Codes we have:

211 Community Information and Referral Services

311 Non-Emergency Police and Other Governmental Services

411 Local Directory Assistance

511 Traffic and Transportation Information

611 Telephone Repair Service

711 Telecommunications Relay Service (TRS)

811 Access to One Call Services to Protect Pipeline and Utilities from Excavation Damage

911 Emergency

Wow, that’s a lot.

211
(800) 273-6222  Alternative Number
(415) 808-4357  Alternative Number
2-1-1 information and referral service for San Francisco. Information and referral service via regular number for the following counties in California: Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, and Solano.
411
  • Free 411 (800-373-3411)  If you don’t mind listening to a 10-second ad first, Free 411 lives up to its name, giving you free business and residential listings (which can optionally be delivered via text message). Thanks to reader kwright for the tip on this one!
  • GOOG-411 (800-466-4411)  Google’s 411 service is surprisingly ad-free, though it limits you to business listings. Like Free 411, it can automatically connect your call and/or send you the listing via SMS. See it in action in the above video.
  • Live Search 411 (800-225-5411) Microsoft’s 411 service offers not only business listings, but also traffic and weather reports, movie showtimes, travel resources, and more. (Live Search also powers Microsoft’s Tellme service.)
  • 511
    611
    Try it on your phone, see what happens. Probably you’ll get somebody from your phone co.
    711
    811
    See today’s release from Pigs Giraffes & Elephants, after the jump.
    911
    So there you have it, your N11 dialing codes.