Posts Tagged ‘employment’

Uh, What’s This – A Mini-Documentary About the SFPD Called “Cops Put Gang Members to Work” in the Mission?

Wednesday, November 13th, 2013

[UPDATE: The video has gone private, sorry. It used to be here.]

Yes, yes it is.

As reported earlier this year by Tim Redmond and Mike Aldax

John Cathey and David Sands are plainclothes anti-gang SFPD officers in the Mission District. This is their story in seven minutes:

“Check out the latest from The I Files- a story about two cops in San Francisco who are taking an unorthodox approach to curbing gang violence.”

The Unpublicized Picket Lines of Octavia Boulevard Housing Construction – Corish Electric Unfair?

Tuesday, September 24th, 2013

Or so they say:

Click to expand

I guess some of these people are electricians?

This is all I know…

OMG, OMG. It’s the Target Store Job Fair August 15-17! Hundreds to be Hired at City Target West, Geary and Masonic – Opens October 2013

Monday, August 12th, 2013

Giant signs don’t lie:

Click to expand

It’ll be a huge cattle call the way they had for Our First City Target in SoMA on Mission last year.

But you should apply here before you show up, I s’pose.

All the deets of the job titles/positions you can apply for, after the jump.

Bon Chance!

(more…)

OMG, the San Francisco Examiner is Hiring a General Assignment Reporter – Apply Today – Srsly, Today, June 10, 2013

Monday, June 10th, 2013

Else you’ll miss the deadline.

See?

“General Assignment Reporter

The San Francisco Examiner seeks an experienced reporter. We are looking for an enthusiastic reporter who knows the region and has good news judgment and a knack for finding stories that others miss. You must be aggressive about covering local and breaking news, creative about generating story ideas, and adept at contextualizing news stories.

Since Examiner reporters typically write two short stories each day, the ideal candidate will be able to write tight, compelling, focused articles and turn around stories quickly. Strong research and investigative skills and the ability to create compelling, succinct stories about complex issues are a must.

Applicants should have a minimum of two years of reporting experience. Bilingual skills are a plus.

Qualified candidates should send a cover letter, resume, and five clips by June 10, 2013 to NewsroomJobs@SFExaminer.com and reference: “Reporter.” Applicants must be eligible to work in the United States for any employer. The Examiner is an EEO Employer. The Examiner offers a competitive compensation package and a full benefits program that includes Medical, Dental, Vision, 401(k).”

If You Want a Job During This Great Recession, Head to a Midwestern Red State – North Dakota Unemployment is Just 3.1%?

Friday, December 21st, 2012

The latest from the BLS, via the Bay Area Observer.

Wow:

Wow…

 

Manager of Empty, Graffiti-Strewn Financial District Building Strikes Back Against Street Youth Culture

Thursday, October 25th, 2012

Here’s the Before

…and here’s the After:

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You’d think the managers would have a better strategy against graffiti, but you’d be wrong…

Here’s What San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee’s San Francisco Looks Like: Empty, Graffiti-Covered Buildings in the FiDi

Tuesday, July 31st, 2012

Like this, at California and Battery in the Heart of the Financial District.

Physical Graffiti, the worst kind: 

Click to expand

Is this your “Innovation Capitol of the World?”

Oh that’s right, you’re all about jobs jobs jobs. And you regularly issue press releases taking credit whenever our unemployment rate goes down.

But what about the time, just recently, when our unemployment rate went up, by half a percentage point?

Oh, so you don’t issue a press release taking credit for that, huh?

How is it possible for San Francisco’s unemployment rate to go up under your watch? How do you explain that?

Oh, that’s right, you don’t.

Maybe it’s possible that you have no effect upon the unemployment rate?

Maybe it’s possible that talking about jobs jobs jobs solely benefits you and your political faction?

Food for thought.

PS: You’re a national laughingstock, in case you don’t know. Why not do something to show that you’re, somehow, slightly independent of Willie Brown and/or PG&E? Just something, anything. Or are you going to be just a Nine-Year Do Boy? 

BOMA Members Advertise on Craigslist for Strikebreaking Janitors – $18 Per Hour – Huge SEIU Protests in the Financh

Tuesday, July 31st, 2012

These days, in the Financial District of San Francisco, it’s the BOMA (Building Owners and Managers Association of San Francisco) vs. the SEIU (Service Employees International Union Local 87).

Seems that it’s contract negotiation season for area janitors, don’t you know.

So you’ll find hundreds of workers loudly circling target buildings, marching around, for example, the 101 California, yesterday.

You know, like this: 

Click to expand – the cops seemed to be cool with marching on the sidewalk, but union members wouldn’t have been allowed to just stand around, apparently

But you know, some building owners have a Back Up Plan, you know, the plan to hire replacement workers at $18.65 per.

Here’s yesterday’s ad from the Craiglist:

We are accepting applications for temporary janitorial positions in San Francisco. The work involves replacing our current work force at commercial office building throughout downtown San Francisco due to a possible labor dispute with the SEIU- Service Employees International Union. 

The rate of pay is $18.65 per hour. Typical shifts are from 6:00pm to 2:00am. The length of temporary employment is unknown at this time.

JOB DUTIES INCLUDE BUT NOT LIMITED TO:
Vacuuming
Remove trash and recycling.
Cleaning and stocking restrooms
Dusting surfaces
Spot cleaning carpets
Follow all job site safety regulations

REQUIREMENTS
Ability to work 7.5 hours on your feet
Ability to push and pull up to 25 lbs.
Ability to work independently or in a team environment
Must be 18 years or older to apply
If required, must be able to pass a criminal background check”

On It Goes…

Would You Like a “Free Gift?” Well, Then Just Join the U.S. Army: MUNI Bus Stop Recruiting Station, Market Street

Friday, June 29th, 2012

In the Financh, not too far from the official recruiting station on Davis near Broadway:

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Remember, “BRING IN THIS FLYER FOR A FREE GIFT!!!”

Burn: New UCLA Study Concludes California High Speed Rail Offers No Net Economic Benefits – “Simply Moving Jobs Around”

Friday, June 22nd, 2012

Well this one is hot off the presses of the UCLA Anderson Forecast:

California High-Speed Rail and Economic Lessons from Japan

Jerry Nickelsburg
Senior Economist
UCLA Anderson Forecast

Saurabh Ahluwalia
Anderson School of Management
UCLA

June 2012

Here’s the start and the end – you’ll have to click above to read the whole thing.

“California High Speed Rail (CHSRL) is once
again in the news as the governor and state legislature
take up the issuance of construction bonds approved
by the voter passage of Proposition 1A of 2008.
Under “project vision and scope” on the CHRSL Authority
website are listed three categories of benefits:
economic, environmental and community.

In this article we focus on the economic benefits.
Specifically we look at economic growth and,
by implication, job creation. That is to say, we are
examining the benefit side of the equation and leaving
the cost side to other analysis.

Though CHSR Authority has developed and vetted a forecasting
model and has commissioned a number of economic
impact studies, these rely on relatively strong, though
perhaps plausible, assumptions. As an alternative,
we examine an actual case of high speed rail, one that
has been widely deemed a success, for evidence of
the magnitude of benefits measured by induced GDP
growth that one can expect from the building and
operation of CHSR over the next 40 years.
Our study of the Japanese Shinkansen system
from 1964 to present fails to provide evidence of
induced aggregate growth.

Rather, the evidence suggests high-speed
rail simply moves jobs around the
geography without creating significant new
employment or economic activity. That is not to say that
CHSR is not justified by population growth, pollution
abatement, or other factors. However, the evidence
from Japan is relatively clear. As an engine of
economic growth in and of itself, CHSR will have only a
marginal impact at best.

Governor Brown claims CHSR to be a visionary
project along the lines of the U.S. Interstate Highway
System, The California Central Water Project, and
the Panama and Suez Canals. As with these projects,
Governor Brown claims HSR will result in job
creation, economic development, particularly in the
Central Valley, the accommodation of population
growth and a cleaner environment.
The California High Speed Rail Authority
(CHSRA) has a set of studies demonstrating a sufficient
benefit cost analysis, a business plan that claims
operating costs will be covered by setting prices at
the currently charged airline prices for travel between
Los Angeles and the Bay Area.

The principal economic benefits cited by the CHSR Authority are the
creation of 100,000 construction jobs for the duration
of the project, operation and maintenance jobs for
the running of the trains, and the creation of 450,000
jobs and faster economic growth as a benefit of the
existence of the rail lines.

But, critics of the business plan abound. The
Board of Supervisors from both Tulare and Kern
Counties, counties who would presumably benefit
from the increased connectivity and economic growth
potential of CHSR voted their opposition to the program
as “currently constituted.

Moreover, questions have been raised about construction costs and timing,
environmental impact, operating costs and ridership
forecasts.

The State Legislative Analyst’s Office,
while not taking a position on the desirability of
CHSR, has critiqued the decision making process and
the quality of information available for legislators to
properly evaluate the issue.

 

 

Conclusions
In this study we have looked for, and failed to
find evidence of economic development that could
be clearly identified with the introduction or
operation of high-speed rail in Japan. This is surprising
because, at least for the Tokaido Line, conditions
were ripe for economic development. To be sure the
prefectures along the Tokaido Line grew. The late
60s and early 70s were a period of transformation and
growth throughout Japan. But the data don’t admit a
clear story that high-speed rail was in and of itself a
differentiating contributor.

Is it possible that absent high-speed rail Kanagawa
Prefecture would have grown more slowly? That
is an experiment that can never be performed. But
when we keep in mind that Japan’s growth in the 60s
and 70s were due to exports of goods and Kanagawa’s
main city, Yokahama, is a major port city for the
Tokyo area, it is easy to conclude that the economic
growth would have occurred with existing low speed
rail and truck transport.

The lessons for California are two-fold.

First, high-speed rail tends to create sprawl as it lowers
the cost for commuters and makes more far-flung
locations possible bedroom communities. This may
be considered a benefit by some and a detriment by
others.

Second, the claims that a multiplier effect (or
economic development effect) of 450,000 jobs as a
result of the introduction and operation of CHSR are
not likely to be realized. There may be good reasons
to invest in CHSR including the possibility that
CHSR is the optimal infrastructure investment for a
growing population; but the economic argument, the
jobs argument, does not seem to stand on very solid
ground.