Posts Tagged ‘enforcement’

Cycling Hipsters Busted by SFPD on Market Near Fifth, San Francisco’s Hotspot for Bicycle Violation Crackdowns

Wednesday, November 28th, 2012

This is the new normal, with the SFPD routinely handing out tickets to bicycling hipsters on Market at or near the Powell Street turnaround crosswalk.

Like this, yesterday, when MACAFRAMA and fedora LEGO bag here got cold busted for, one presumes,  running a red light and/or listening to tunes using both the left and right earbuds:

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When will we learn?

A Tip for Cyclists on Market Street: When Getting Cited by the SFPD, Make Sure to Check Your Email

Monday, May 14th, 2012

‘Cause that will save you time when you finally make it to the office.

See?

Cold busted:

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OMG, It’s a Huge, Brand-New, 137-Page Cycling Safety Study from the Mineta Transportation Institute – Here’s Your Free PDF

Thursday, February 23rd, 2012

Here it is:

Promoting Bicycle Commuter Safety(PDF 2.2MB)

Big, in’nt?

And oh, did I say “brand-new?” What I meant to say was slightly dated. Check it:

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(“Procedural review?” The Ghost of Mr. Anderson lives on. Injunction junction, what was your function?)

Now, realize first that everything in San Jose is named for Norm Mineta, and here you go:

“Study Shows How To Improve Bicycle Commuter Safety; SF Bay Area, Portland, OR Are Case Studies

Mineta Transportation Institute’s free report evaluates risks, safety, planning, enforcement and more.

SAN JOSE, Calif., Feb. 22, 2012 — The Mineta Transportation Institute (transweb.sjsu.edu) has published a report that leverages literature review and case studies in the San Francisco Bay area and Portland, OR to recommend ways to improve safety for bicycle commuters. Promoting Bicycle Commuter Safety includes chapters on risks, application of social psychology to bike safety, dimensions of effective practices, and more. The report also includes illustrative tables and photos. Principal investigator was Asbjorn Osland, Ph.D., with several chapter contributors. The 157-page report is available for free PDF download from transweb.sjsu.edu/project/2927.html.

“A basic premise in this report is that cycling should be encouraged because as the number of cyclists increases, the attention of motorists and safety improve,” said Dr. Osland. “However, an important caveat is that the number of cyclists must be commensurate with the infrastructure built for cycling to enhance their safety. This report discusses and evaluates various bicycle commuter settings against a framework of what are called the 5 Es – engineering, education, enforcement, encouragement, and evaluation.”

Dr. Osland noted that, of those five categories, engineering is essential because the infrastructure is vital to protecting cyclists. Education is emphasized because safety is the central focus of the report. A number of case studies was included, and the Bicycle Transportation Alliance in the Portland OR area was prominently featured as an effective example of the “education” and “encouragement” dimensions of the 5 Es. The report concludes with a discussion, and it notes the need for continued research or evaluation, with particular reference to using the social psychological model.

As part of the literature review, researchers found a large amount of crucial data, including:

–  In 2008 males accounted for 87 percent of bicycling fatalities in the
U.S. More cyclists are male, but females may follow the rules more.

 –  Bicycle accidents that involved a motor vehicle were a very small
percentage of all bicycle accidents; however, the vast majority of fatal
bicycle accidents involved a vehicle. This is why engineers suggest
keeping cyclists separate from vehicles.

–  Too many cyclists violate the rules of the road, yet enforcement is
often lacking.

 –  Driver aggression, drivers “squeezing past” bicycles when there isn’t
enough room for them to safely pass, and cyclists riding poorly were
mentioned as problems in the Berkeley surveys.

–  A lack of empirical data on outcomes makes it difficult to identify true
best practic­es regarding safety education programs. However, wearing
helmets, maximizing conspicuity, and maintaining one’s bicycle in good
working condition while following the rules of the road seem logical.

Tables in the report include those detailing bicycle rider injuries and fatalities; risks associated with riding against traffic, with traffic, and on sidewalks; bicycle stress level values and components; comparison of several bicycle trip factors in the U.S. and Northern Europe; and more.

Illustrations include before-and-after photos of street redesign; examples of safety posters; a children’s bike rodeo; an example of a “bike garden” in Switzerland, where cyclists can practice safety skills; bike safety web pages; street markings and signs; and more. Of special note are the maps detailing the city of Berkeley, Calif. bicycle boulevard network, built on existing and newly-created calmed streets.

The complete 157-page report, including an application of models to the 5 Es, is available for free PDF download at transweb.sjsu.edu/project/1003.html

ABOUT THE PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR

Asbjorn Osland, Ph.D., is professor of management at San Jose State University. He received his doctorate and MBA from Case Western Reserve University. He also holds a Master of Social Work and a post-baccalaureate in accounting. He has taught full time since 1993. Before that he worked in Latin America and West Africa for 13 years for Chiquita Brands, for ten years in several countries for Plan International, and for the Peace Corps in Colombia. His research interests include case writing, business and society, and international HRM, with over 60 published articles, cases and chapters, and a comparable number of conference presentations..

ABOUT THE MINETA TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE

The Mineta Transportation Institute (MTI) conducts research, education, and information and technology transfer, focusing on multimodal surface transportation policy and management issues, especially as they relate to transit. MTI was established by Congress in 1991 as part of the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act (ISTEA) and was reauthorized under TEA-21 and again under SAFETEA-LU. The Institute has been funded by Congress through the US Department of Transportation’s (DOT) Research and Innovative Technology Administration, by the California Legislature through the Department of Transportation (Caltrans), and by other public and private grants and donations, including grants from the US Department of Homeland Security. DOT selected MTI as a National Center of Excellence following competitions in 2002 and 2006. The internationally respected members of the MTI Board of Trustees represent all major surface transportation modes. MTI’s focus on policy and management resulted from the Board’s assessment of the transportation industry’s unmet needs. That led directly to choosing the San Jose State University College of Business as the Institute’s home. Visit transweb.sjsu.edu

The Shame of San Francisco: People Abusing the California Handicapped Placard Program for Easy Parking

Thursday, December 1st, 2011

Most of the cars parked in this area just south of Market Street had handicapped placards.

Here’s three in a row, the most my wide angle lens would let me take in. This is typical:

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The fact is that most of the people who use handicapped placards to park in San Francisco are abusing the system. 

Oh well.

DPT Stakeout at Costco – Disabled Placard “Street Team” – Expired Permit – Jersey Plates – Lonely Pooch

Monday, November 21st, 2011

(Check it, my first pro-SFMTA post.)

This cute pup was guarding an Acura parked on 10th Street while its owner visited our SoMA Costco (I assume, I mean, why else would anybody park down there?)

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Problem? The disabled placard hanging from the rear-view has expired. See?

So guess who was waiting for this car’s owner to show up – it was DPT’s Disabled Placard Street Team with their bright blue shoulder patches.

Les mise-en-scene avec Etat de Jardin* license plates sur la Acura bleu:

This issue could end up costing the driver thousands of dollars, when all is said and done.** (I can’t say for sure because I don’t get paid by the City Family to stakeout cars, plus I had to split. Oh well.)

Now, WWSD? Like What Would KRON-TV’s Stanley Roberts Do if he came upon this scene? Oh yes, something like this.

But, you know, I might possibly be beefier than Stanley (I know I’m taller than he but I could actually outweigh him) and, you know, I wouldn’t want to get into an another Elmo situation.

Bon courage, Acura pooch. Your owner will need all the love she can get today.

*Garden State – it’s a Jersey Thing.***

**The funny thing is that Costco has plenty of free parking. And honestly, I don’t think the good people of Costco would care all that much if you parked in their garage while shopping elsewhere. As stated, there’s nothing else going on ’round that area so it’s not like they’re on the lookout for renegade parkers. 

***YouTube, you’re too funny. Oprah + Snooki = ???

“CTIA -The Wireless Association” Explains Why Its Suing Us Over Gavin Newsom’s “Cell Phone Right-to-Know” Ordinance

Wednesday, October 5th, 2011

Well, after saying it was going to do so, the cell phone industry is actually suing us.

All the deets are below.

The friendly face of the Cellular Telephone Industries Association, aka CITA, The Wireless Association. This fellow has a big beef with our little town.

CITA Vice President of Public Affairs John Walls

“CTIA-The Wireless Association® Files Challenge to San Francisco’s “Cell Phone Right-to-Know” Ordinance

WASHINGTON, Oct. 4, 2011 – Today, CTIA-The Wireless Association® asked a federal court to block the enforcement of San Francisco’s “Cell Phone Right-to-Know” ordinance. CTIA’s challenge argues that the Ordinance is barred under the First Amendment and conflicts with federal law governing the safety of wireless devices.

As CTIA explains in its motion, the Ordinance requires retailers to distribute misleading statements and graphics that send the false message that cell phones approved by the FCC are not safe. In fact, the FCC limits radiofrequency emissions from cell phones to ensure that phones sold in the U.S. emit RF energy far below levels shown in scientific testing to have any adverse health effects. The FCC’s standard includes a wide margin of safety for all users. Last year the FDA categorically concluded that there is “No Evidence Linking Cell Phone Use to Risk of Brain Tumors,” and earlier this year the Chairman of the FCC, Julius Genachowski, said that he was “confident that [the FCC's] standards are protecting the health of people.”

CTIA-The Wireless Association Vice President of Public Affairs John Walls released the following statement:

“The materials the City would require be posted and handed out at retail stores are both alarmist and false. The FCC and FDA have repeatedly found that cell phone use does not pose a danger to human health. The Ordinance recommends such things as turning the phone off when not in use, a suggestion that would render critical emergency communications unavailable to San Francisco residents.”

More deets after the jump

(more…)

OMG, the SFPD is Super-Sizing the Crackdown on Inbound Market: Right Turn Only = Right Turn Only

Wednesday, September 7th, 2011

This is the scene these days on inbound Market just after 6th Street in the corrupt Twitterloin.

The cops see you driving down Market, contrary to the relatively recent right turn only policy, and then you get directed to pull over so you can get cited with extreme prejudice.

Motorcycle dude was just hanging out in the middle of Market, just waiting for another offender:

Click to expand (1500 days of outdoor use have rendered my Canon 5D incapable of functioning except in the extremely hands-off “green square” mode. Pray for Mojo.)

It’s Official: The SFPD is Cracking Down on Market Street Cyclists in the Mid-Market and Crime-Ridden Tenderloin Areas

Thursday, March 3rd, 2011

Now do I think that this SFPD officer was told to drive around in his truck all day and hand out tickets to cyclists? Nope, not really.

H0wever, it seems that, for whatever reason, as far as cyclists should be concerned, there’s a new Sheriff in town, so to speak, you know, for 2011.

Can I prove this with satistics* and whatnot a month or a quarter or a year or two down the road?

We’ll just have to wait and see.

Irregardless, with great power comes great responsibility, or something:

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Choose wisely.

*It’s just like with Pruis drivers at night – do I notice them because I want to, because I’m biased, because I only see what confirms my suspicions? Don’t know for sure, I s’pose. But the fact remains that most of the drivers going about the Streets of San Francisco at night without headlights on are Prius owners. This has to do with a lot of factors, and Toyota is somewhat to blame, apparently, but anyway, the point is I can’t do anymore to persuade than I’ve already done. Oh well.

OMG, It’s the Mint Police – Add This to Your Collection of Bay Area Law Enforcement Sightings

Thursday, October 28th, 2010

This is a new one on me – it’s the Mint Police.

As seen on Haight Street near Mint Hill:

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The Mint Police they live inside of my head.

The Mint Police they come to me in my bed.

The Mint Police they’re coming to arrest me oh no.

Established in 1792, the United States Mint Police is one of the oldest federal law enforcement agencies in the nation.  Responsible for establishing the standard “As secure as Fort Knox,” our officers continue to meet that standard everyday.  The U.S. Mint Police are responsible for protecting over $100 billion in Treasury and other Government assets stored in facilities located at Philadelphia, PA; San Francisco, CA; West Point, NY; Denver, CO; Fort Knox, KY; and our headquarters in Washington, DC.

Today, U.S. Mint Police Officers have the primary responsibility for protecting life and property, preventing, detecting, and investigating criminal acts, collecting and preserving evidence, making arrests, and enforcing Federal and local laws.

Coming Monday to Walnut Creek: A Rally in Support of Johannes Mehserle, Killer of Oscar Grant

Tuesday, July 13th, 2010

Via the hardworking East Bay Citizen comes news of a rally in support of former BART police officer Johannes Mehserle “and our Law Enforcement Officers.” It will go down on Monday, July 19th, 2010 at the Walnut Creek Courthouse at 2:00 PM. O.K. then.

But there’s a catch – only those who support Johannes can come:

“Anyone who supports Johannes and our Law Enforcement Officers may attend. This is a peaceful rally to show our support for Johannes and the injustices he is experiencing.”

I don’t know, I’m not sure which “injustices” we’re talking about here. Killing somebody by mistake, that can put you in prison, right? Is anybody saying that the jury verdict of manslaughter is an injustice? (Obviously, the absurd murder charges* just weren’t going to happen, right? So, what else was there for the jury to choose from?)

Or maybe injustices could be death threats against family members? That’s all I can think of.

Anyway, here it is

Claycord has more deets.

Will “hundreds of people” show up on Monday? There are 35 “confirmed guests” already…

*I can sort of see why murder charges brought early on, but I don’t know why they weren’t eventually dropped by the D.A. Oh well.