Posts Tagged ‘exhibition’

Oh No, Now Even Our San Francisco Zoo is Working Blue – “The Scoop on Poop” Opens January 25th 2014

Wednesday, January 15th, 2014

Taking a cue from our naughty, naughty PUC, your San Francisco Zoo has a new exhibition called The Scoop on Poop.

I’m appalled.

But your kids will love it.

And afterwards, check out the brand-new ELINOR FRIEND PLAYGROUND.

All right, see you there!

All the deets:

The Scoop on Poop! Opening Day

Special Members-Only Preview: January 25, 9:00 – 10:00 am
Open to Public: January 25, 10:00 am in the Pachyderm Building

Poop. Doo-doo. Dung. Number 2. No matter what you call it, you’ll be able to learn all about it at The Scoop on Poop, our latest special exhibition on view in the Pachyderm Building. Based on a popular children’s book by the same name by Dr. Wayne Lynch, The Scoop on Poop leads visitors on an investigation of what poop is and how animals and humans use it.

Animals use poop to build homes, hide from enemies, attract mates, send messages, and cool off – some even eat it! Veterinarians, farmers, naturalists, paleontologists, Maasai tribesmen, and power companies use it, too. Poop is a scientific puzzle, and with a little detective work, you can learn a lot about an animal by what it leaves behind.

Ever more deets, after the jump

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Japantown Sumo by San Francisco Photographer Dave Golden

Monday, September 10th, 2012

As seen on Post Street by Dave Golden:

Wow.

Welcome Back, Terracotta: China’s Famous Terracotta Warriors Coming Back to Our Asian Art Museum February 22, 2013

Thursday, August 16th, 2012

They’re ba-aaack!

Armored General, Qin dynasty 221-206 BCE, Height 203 cm, weight 250 kg. Excavated from Pit 1, Qin Shihuang tomb complex, 1980. Reproduced with kind permission from the Qin Shihuang Terracotta Warriors and Horses Museum. Serial number 002747.

All the deets:

“CHINA’S TERRACOTTA WARRIORS:THE FIRST EMPEROR’S LEGACY - Asian Art Museum kicks off 10th anniversary in Civic Center with epic exhibition

SAN FRANCISCO, August 15, 2012—The Asian Art Museum kicks off its 10th anniversary in San Francisco’s Civic Center with an exhibition from one of the greatest archaeological discoveries in modern time. China’s Terracotta Warriors: The First Emperor’s Legacy will be on view February 22 – May 27, 2013.

The exhibition features 120 rare objects from the great tomb complex of China’s First Emperor (259-210 BCE), including 10 life-size terracotta figures—the maximum number of figures permitted outside China in a single exhibition.

Captivating the world since its discovery in 1974, the First Emperor’s tomb complex is one of the largest burial sites ever constructed. Estimated at nearly 250,000 square feet—or more than four American football fields—it includes a scale replica of the emperor’s imperial palace, complete with stables, offices, an armory and even a zoo. Ancient historians also described “flowing rivers” of mercury, of which trace amounts have recently been confirmed by scientists.

Perhaps most impressive are the estimated 8,000 terracotta figures excavated to date, including warriors of all ranks (all individually constructed, no two faces are alike), acrobats, musicians and horses. The tomb complex took 700,000 laborers nearly 40 years to build.

In 1994, the museum, then located in Golden Gate Park, was among the first to present the terracotta warriors to a U.S. audience. The 2013 exhibition offers a new generation of visitors the rare chance to view the clay figures up close. Visitors will also discover new secrets from the tomb, with more information than ever before on the First Emperor, his reign, and his quest for immortality.

“Celebrating 10 years in our Civic Center home calls for something extraordinary,” said Jay Xu, executive director, Asian Art Museum. “In China, history is being unearthed. Bringing a chapter of this epic story to San Francisco—with 10 life-size sculptures from one of the most significant discoveries of our time—is a great way to commemorate this occasion.”

EXHIBITION TICKETS: $8-$22
Advance tickets go on sale October 16, 2012
More info: www.asianart.org/terracotta-warriors

OMG, “Playland at the Conservatory” is Totally Awesome – Annual Garden Railway Show Has Beach Ephemera

Friday, November 18th, 2011

Get all the deets right here, and here at the Richmond District Blog, and below.

This show will run through April 15, 2012.

Check it, Playland at the Beach ephemera:

All photos by Nina Sazevich – click to expand

“Take a trip down memory lane as a bygone era of seaside amusement comes to miniature life in this season’s Conservatory of Flowers garden railway exhibition

November 18, 2011 ­ – April 15, 2012

Step right up for a ride back in time as the Conservatory of Flowers presents an all new garden railway display celebrating the legendary Playland at the Beach and a bygone era of seaside amusement that was located on San Francisco’s West End. In a dazzling display landscaped with hundreds of dwarf plants, model trains and trolleys wend their way past the famed Sutro Baths, zip around a replica of the Victorian-era Cliff House and whiz through a fantastic mini version of San Francisco’s beloved Playland at the Beach. 

Playland at the Conservatory, the conservatory’s 4th Annual Garden Railway, is an entirely new layout that resurrects the heyday of San Francisco’s west end, an area that flourished as a destination for fun and thrills after a new railroad built in 1884 made travel out to the ocean affordable. A dozen San Francisco landmarks, now mostly lost to time, are recreated in miniature and set in a landscape of hundreds of dwarf plants that bring the rocky cliffs and sandy shores of the area to life. Sutro Baths, the fantastical 7-pool swimming complex built in 1896 by eccentric mayor Adolph Sutro, nestles under Sutro’s other attraction, the Cliff House, which he transformed in that same year into a 7-story Victorian chateau. 

No doubt the recreated Playland at the Beach will be the star of the garden railway. Young and old alike will marvel at the sight of Playland’s most famous attractions in miniature, all in swirling motion and bright with twinkling carnival lights, while the sounds of the arcade and even Laffing Sal’s boisterous voice transport visitors right back to the midway. Wee rollercoaster cars climb the steep tracks of the Big Dipper, Playland’s biggest thrill ride from the 1920s to the 1950s, while a mini Airplane Ride spins and spins in circles. Other attractions include the treacherous Diving Bell, the Fun House and Playland¹s famed food arcade where hungry revelers could grab an enchilada at the Hot House or a sweet at the Candy Factory. 

As in past years, these replicas are all creatively crafted in miniature from recycled and repurposed materials. Playland’s historic 1906 carousel was created from a discarded light fixture, a slide carousel and a record player. The individual cages of the Rock-O-Plane are made from old pencil sharpeners. 

The exhibit also includes real memorabilia and photographs from Playland and beyond in a fascinating display that tells the story of San Francisco’s lost ocean-front treasures. Original wool bathing suits from Sutro Baths, the toothpick amusement park made by San Quentin inmate Jack Harrington that was displayed in the museum at the Baths, a Dodger bumper car, an original Playland sign and more provide visitors with an engaging way to experience and learn about San Francisco’s past. Period arcade games offer a hands-on history lesson with a chance to get your future from Zoltar, step into a vintage 1960s photo booth or goof around in the fun house mirrors, while a special scavenger hunt spinning wheel is a great, interactive way for young children to explore the exhibit. Portions of the popular documentary “Remembering Playland” will also be showing in the gallery.”

All right, see you there!

Another Must-See Show at the de Young: Masters of Venice: Renaissance Painters From the Kunsthistorisches Museum

Friday, November 18th, 2011

Here’s the full title of this sensual and opulent exhibition: Masters of Venice: Renaissance Painters of Passion and Power From the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna.

So, it’s Hello, Vienna calling

It’s amazing how San Francisco gets all these shows at our de Young Museum.

Janos Gereben has the story:

“Vienna’s treasures now are on loan to the de Young, the only stopping place for “Masters of Venice.” As before, with Tutankhamen and French Impressionists, Fine Arts Museums Director John E. Buchanan Jr. and President Dede Wilsey have found a golden opportunity for The City to act as a temporary “storehouse” for a collection whose home is being renovated.”

Fine Arts Museums Director John E. Buchanan displays the exhibition’s weighty tome from Sylvia Ferino-Pagden Lynn Federle Orr

Click to expand

This is it, this is your must-see show, it’s just one after the other:

  • Saint Sebastian (ca.1457–1459) by Andrea Mantegna, represents early Renaissance painting and is the first of three paintings on this subject by the artist.  In this work Mantegna incorporates details of ancient sculpture and architecture which organizes the pictorial space through linear perspective.
  • Four rare works by the enigmatic painter Giorgio da Castelfranco, known as Giorgione.  The Three Philosophers (ca. 1477–1510), one of the most celebrated works of the 16th century, uses an innovative integration of the figures within the spatial continuum of nature which marks a dramatic advance in the evolution of Western representation imagery. Also featured in the exhibition is his beautiful Portrait of a Young Woman (Laura)(1506) and pensive Youth with an Arrow (ca. 1508–1510).
  • More than a dozen works by Tiziano Vecellio, know as Titian, once Giorgione’s assistant, whose talent soon rivaled his master’s.  His work is synonymous with the Venetian style — lustrous pigments, sharply graduated light and shadows delineating robust forms such as his sumptuous Danaë (1560s) and the mysterious and moody Bravo (The Assassin) (ca.1515–1520).
  • The tapestry-like, shimmering and sensuously colored works by Paolo Caliari, known as Veronese including the grand scaled Annointing of David (ca. 1555), and the dishonored heroine Lucretia (1528–1588), whose creamy skin and sumptuous fabrics divert the viewer’s eye from her suicide blade.

What you need to know:

Venetian paintings from this period have not been shown in the United States since 1938, and they will be shown only at the de Young.
Where: De Young Museum, 50 Hagiwara Tea Garden Drive, Golden Gate Park, San Francisco
When: The exhibit continues through Feb. 12. The museum is open 9:30 a.m to 5:15 p.m. Tuesday-Sunday. It is closed Nov. 24, Dec. 25 and Jan. 1.
Cost: $10-$20

But remember, this all ends February 12, 2012.

See you there!

It starts off with a big photo of the Kunsthistorisches Museum, which contains one of the four big “princely collections” (along with the Louvre, the Hermitage, and the Prado)

And then, on with the show:

It’s one masterpiece after the next:

What more can you ask for?

Ever more deets, after the jump
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OMG, It’s Photographer’s Heaven: A Pop-Up Shrine to Adobe PhotoShop! PhotoWalks, Workshops, Classes – Ends August 6

Wednesday, July 27th, 2011

Have you heard about the two-week Photoshop & You pop-up event at 550 Sutter in Union Square?

OMG, you gotta get over there and check it out.

“Adobe has a new retail venture: a two-week pop-up location. Think of it as a hybrid exhibition, gallery, classroom, experimental lab, retail store and creative experience designed to immerse the public in the visual world of digital imaging. It’s part art, part tech – and all free.”

All the deets:

- Free to the public (including all workshops, classes and photowalks)
– Open until Saturday, August 6
– Hours of operation:
    Sun–Wed: 11 a.m.–7 p.m.
    Thurs–Sat: 11 a.m.–9 p.m.
– Photos of the space: http://on.fb.me/oBT1kl

Now I think you’re too late for the big Adobe Chinatown Photowalk on July 31 (don’t go there without an invite, and I’ll tell you, you can’t get an invite at this late date) but there’s other stuff going on.

Check it:

And check out the schedule – there’s a lot of stuff:

See you there!

Boy, Not Much Has Changed Since This WWII-Era Map Was Made By the Golden Pheasant Restaurant

Friday, February 11th, 2011

The five-star-rated San Francisco EATS Exhibition continues in the basement and the “6th Floor Skylight Gallery” (Note to self: Say what now, Skylight Gallery?) of our Main Public Library on Larkin.

Here’s a part of the ephemera and whatnot they’ve got down there – a useful map of the bay area with all the landmarks and cities laid out.

Enjoy:

Click to expand

“San Francisco Eats showcases the culinary delights that can be found in the San Francisco Public Library’s collections dating back to the mid 19th century and will serve as a visual feast for visitors of all ages. From the Gold Rush to Slow Food, San Francisco has never stopped being a beacon of gastronomic delight.

This exhibition includes menus, historical photographs, an array of food writers, cookbooks and culinary history, ephemera such as coasters and matchbooks, and San Francisco food inventions, including gadgets and signature dishes.

Exhibition is on view in both the Jewett Gallery, Lower Level and Skylight Gallery, Sixth Floor.

The San Francisco Public Library is dedicated to building its collections and welcomes your donations.  For more information on how to submit or donate, contact the San Francisco History Center at 415-557-4567.

HeadphonesCheck out the Opening Program: Food for Thought Podcast

Related Exhibitions and Events

*San Francisco Eats
Saturday, December 11, 2010 – Sunday, March 20, 2011
Main Library, Skylight Gallery – 6th Floor
Saved by the Sea
Saturday, February 12, 2011
Potrero
*Lights! Camera! Cuisine!
Saturday, February 12, 2011
North Beach
The San Francisco Cliff House
Wednesday, February 16, 2011
Richmond
Western Addition’s “On the Same Page” Book Discussion Group
Wednesday, February 16, 2011
Western Addition
*The Fortune Cookie Chronicles: Adventures in the World of Chinese Food
Saturday, February 19, 2011
Chinatown
*Mochitsuki — Japanese Rice Cake Making Party by Kagami Kai
Saturday, February 19, 2011
Western Addition
Eddie Madril, Native American Storyteller & Dancer
Wednesday, March 2, 2011
Main Library, Children’s Center – 2nd Floor
Ravenous:
Thursday, March 3, 2011
Main Library, Latino/Hispanic Meeting Room B
An Extravagant Hunger: The Passionate Years of M.F.K. Fisher
Wednesday, March 9, 2011
Main Library, Latino/Hispanic Meeting Room A and B
A Little Piece of Earth
Saturday, March 19, 2011
Potrero

Caliber’s “People, Places, and Spaces” Urban Photography Show Starts August 19th

Friday, August 13th, 2010

Some true calibur pimps from Caliber will present an urban photography show at DWN_TWN. The reception at 6:30 PM on Thursday, August 19th, 2010 will kick things off and the exhibit will run until September 19th at 644 Hyde Street, just up from Geary.

You’ll get to see work from:

Brad Evans

Troy Holden

Travis Jensen

See?

 
See you there!

Come See the “Presidio Habitats” Art Exhibition Plus the New Presidio Park Trail

Monday, July 26th, 2010

Have you seen Presidio Habitats,” the Site-Based Art Exhibition Celebrating Presidio Nature and Wildlife? Well, then get up there, it’s ending May 15, 2011.

Bring your walking shoes and then make the Triskelion (srsly, that’s what they call it) pavilion at Fort Winfield Scott your starting point.

Forty-foot shipping containers never looked so good:

Click to expand

Here it is from the outside:

And here’s the starting gate of Presidio Habitats:

Something to do with bunnnies and turtles, take a look:

O.K. then. Here’s Patience by Jensen Architects. or part of it anyway:

The mise-en-scene:

Western Screech Owl Habitats by Ai Weiwei:

A 600mm shot shows that these porcelain palaces are move-in ready:

Winged Wisdom by Phillippe Becker Design / Brody Hartman:

A closer view:

Sculpture Habitat for the Gray Fox by CEBRA

Owl Dome by Taalman Koch Architecture:

That’s just a taste. The whole point is that you’re supposed to get out there and go see everything for yourself. The more the merrier.

As these people realized on Saturday, walking along the new/improved Park Trail. (Learn more about the changes to this trail after the jump.)

The entire place is one giant art gallery but without the white wine.

And, oh yes, here’s one concept that didn’t make it. I guess you’d need to suppose that a bird made a nest and laid eggs in a golf cart and then somebody hoisted it into the air. Anyway, here’s the Photoshopped proposal: 

(This installation might serve to hack off the golfers of the Presidio, I don’t know…)

There you have it. Here are some upcoming events for PH and you can find the deets of the Park Trail after the jump.

Exhibition Pavilion and Self-Guided Tours
The starting point for the Presidio Habitatsexperience is an indoor exhibition space created from repurposed shipping containers. Here visitors can view all 25 proposals submitted for the exhibition, scale models, and other artist material, as well as video about the Presidio’s plants and wildlife. An Exhibition Mapwill lead you on a self-guided journey encompassing all installation sites. The Exhibition Pavilion hours through October 31, 2010: 11 am – 5 pm, Wednesday-Sunday. It is located at the corner of Storey Avenue and Ralston Avenue in the Fort Scott District.

Log Cabin Series
The Presidio Trust presents a year-long series of talks, multimedia presentations, and performances at the historic Log Cabin. Inspired by the Presidio, its wildlife, and Habitats art, the Log Cabin Series will host events on the second Thursday of each month. The Exhibition Pavilion will be open until 7 pm on these evenings.

Animal Estates and Edible Estates: An Evening with Fritz Haeg
Thursday, June 10, 7–8:30 pm
Author, designer, and artist Fritz Haeg created Snag Tower, a vertical dwelling for native species and currently an installation of Presidio Habitats. Learn about his project Animal Estates, proposing the re-introduction of native animals into cities, and his book Edible Estates: Attack on the Front Lawn.

Triskelion: The Story of the Presidio Habitats Exhibition Pavilion
Thursday, July 8, 7–8 pm

San Francisco Architects Zoe Prillinger and Luke Ogrydziak, known for their progressive, modern designs that include new media technologies, discuss their creation of the Presidio HabitatsExhibit Pavilion from repurposed shipping containers arranged at 120 degree angles around a central atrium.

The Birds and the Bees: A Presidio Experience
Thursday, August 12, 7–8 pm

About 200 bird species and 57 bee species buzz and fly through the Presidio. Gain a new perspective on the different shapes and sizes of wildlife homes within the Presidio from Presidio Trust natural resource experts.

The Art of Patience: Meet Architect Mark Jensen
Thursday, September 9, 7–8 pm
Architect Mark Jensen will discuss his Habitats installation Patience, featuring dramatically austere yellow chairs that afford visitors a unique perspective on the Presidio’s Great Blue Herons.

Family Program: Create with Nature
Saturday, June 12, 10 am to 2 pm
Saturday, August 7, 10 am to 2 pm

Kids and grown-ups alike will get creative with natural materials in an outdoor Presidio setting. The ingredients for the day include wood, leaves, stone, pine cones, bark, branches, water, and imagination. Bring a picnic lunch or snack. Meet at the Exhibition Pavilion.

Guided Adventures
Presidio staff, friends, and FOR-SITE Foundation representatives will lead visitors on guided walks. Meet at the Exhibition Pavilion. RSVP is required to (415) 561-5418 or presidio@presidiotrust.gov.

Presidio Butterflies 101 Walk
RSVP to (415) 561-5418 or presidio@presidiotrust.gov
Sunday, July 18, 10 am to Noon
Sunday, August 29, 10 am to Noon

Presidio Habitats Curatorial Walk
RSVP to (415) 561-5418 or presidio@presidiotrust.gov
Saturday, July 24, 10 am to Noon
Saturday, August 7, 10 am to Noon

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