Posts Tagged ‘famsf’

I’m Calling It: Our Tech Bubble Will Burst in 2016, When Raphael’s “Portrait of a Lady with a UNICORN” Arrives at PoLoH

Friday, September 25th, 2015

1515: The Age of Great Masters

2015: The Age of Unicorns:


The Tempting of Fate begins Jan 9, 2016:

Sublime Beauty: Raphael’s “Portrait of a Lady with a Unicorn” – January 9, 2016 – April 10, 2016

This focused exhibition features one of Raphael’s most beguiling and enigmatic paintings. The masterpiece, presented in the United States for the first time, will be lent by the Galleria Borghese in Rome, where it was first recorded in the collection in 1682.

Portrait of a Lady with a Unicorn (ca. 1505–1506) features an unidentified blond-haired sitter and epitomizes the beauty of Raphael’s female portraits during his Florentine period. The exhibition will explore the possible identity of this subject, as well as the painting’s distinct iconography, including the unicorn she holds in her lap. Scholars believe that the painting was commissioned to celebrate a wedding, and the unicorn, a conventional symbol of chastity, may offer clues to her familial lineage.

The exhibition further highlights the stylistic relationships between this masterpiece and Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa. Leonardo’s canonical work, painted in Florence in the early years of the 16th century, had a great impact on the younger Raphael, who also practiced in the city during this period. Raphael’s sophisticated adaptation of Leonardo’s innovations in portrait compositions resulted in Portrait of a Lady with a Unicorn, a painting that hints at the Mona Lisa with its half-length format, its sitter with hands folded in her lap, and its setting before a distant landscape. Visitors will be able to explore Raphael’s painting in detail and get a glimpse into its intriguing history.

About the Artist

Painter, draftsman and architect Raphael (1483–1520) was one of the most famous artists working in Italy during the period from 1500 to 1520, often identified as the High Renaissance. His paintings are noteworthy for their great beauty and harmony, epitomizing the Renaissance virtues of balance and ideal form. His later production exhibits an interest in expressing movement and emotion through narratives. He is best known for religious subjects, portraits, and historical scenes.

This exhibition is organized by the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco and the Cincinnati Art Museum in collaboration with the Foundation for Italian Art and Culture. The Legion of Honor presentation is made possible by a lead sponsorship from the Frances K. and Charles D. Field Foundation, in memory of Mr. and Mrs. Charles D. Field.

Girl With A Pearl Earring: You’ve Seen the Movie, Now See the Real Thing – Dutch Paintings at the de Young in January!

Tuesday, October 23rd, 2012

Look, it’s the Girl With A Pearl Earring:

Oh, wait a sec, here she is:

Johannes Vermeer (Delft 1632–1675 Delft) Girl with a Pearl Earring, ca. 1665. Oil on canvas, 17 1/2 x 15 3/8 in. (44.5 x 39 cm) Royal Picture Gallery Mauritshuis, The Hague, Bequest of Arnoldus des Tombe, 1903 (inv. no. 670)

Well, guess what. They’re going to pack her up and send her to Golden Gate Park to be put on display for the first half of 2013 at our de Young Museum.

This is huge.

All the deets:

Girl with a Pearl Earring: Dutch Paintings from the Mauritshuis – At the de Young Museum January 26—June 2, 2013

San Francisco, October 2012–The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco are pleased to announce that on January 26, 2013, the de Young Museum will be the first North American venue to present Girl with a Pearl Earring: Dutch Paintings from the Mauritshuis, a selection of paintings from the Royal Picture Gallery Mauritshuis, The Hague. The de Young will host 35 paintings from the collection, including the renowned Girl with a Pearl Earring by Johannes Vermeer, The Goldfinch by Carel Fabritius, and four works by Rembrandt van Rijn. Highlighting the spectacular artistic achievements of the Dutch Golden Age, these works reflect the culture of artistic, economic, and technological innovation that allowed the Netherlands to prosper in the 17th century.

At the center of this exhibition is one of the world’s most famous paintings, Vermeer’s masterpiece, Girl with a Pearl Earring. This work, sometimes called “the Dutch Mona Lisa,” is one of only 36 known paintings by the artist and rarely travels outside the Netherlands. Though little is known about Vermeer’s life, the quiet grace and virtuoso technique evident in his paintings, and in particular his rendering of light, have placed him among the most important artists of the 17th century. Many of the details of his technique can only be appreciated through close examination of the painting surface, such as the few tiny brushstrokes that indicate the reflection on the pearl, and the broader, more expressive painting of her ultramarine and yellow turban.

Ever more deets, after the jump.


Good Times: Going Raccoon-Fishing on Treasure Island at Night – You Can Use Teddy Grahams as Bait

Friday, November 4th, 2011

As seen on Halloween Night, 2011:

Via julesreyes – click to expand

Raccoons just love San Francisco. Remember?

“Via the Legion of Honor’s Facebook, comes a link to this outstanding capture from Plomomedia’s Flickr Photostream.


Here it is full-size.

Of course, there are scores of raccoons in the area. But is there a reason that this gaze would congregate at a Yelp-rated #18 46th Ave bus?

Well, if the well-paid gardeners and maintenance workers of Strybing Arboretum carry around cans of catfood for the red foxes, can’t bus operators have a little fun too?”

OMG, At the Legion of Honor: One of the Magna Carta (Great Charter of English Liberties) Exemplifications – Through June 5

Monday, May 9th, 2011

I’ll tell you, cartas don’t get any more magna than this – it’s a once-in-a-lifetime presentation of the Magna Carta at your Legion of Honor Museum going on now through June 5th, 2011.

Brush up on your Latin and then click to expand. (There’s a lot of stuff in there that refers to barons, that’s for sure…)

All the deets:

“The Magna Carta – May 7, 2011 – June 5, 2011

The Magna Carta (or Great Charter of English Liberties), one of the most important legal documents in the history of democracy, is on display at the Legion of Honor May 7–June 5. The document is presented in Gallery 3 under a Spanish ceiling dating from approximately 1500. The Magna Carta coming to San Francisco belongs to the Bodleian Library in Oxford, England, and is one of four surviving manuscripts from the revised 1217 issue. The document is considered an original Magna Carta—not a copy, but an official engrossment or exemplification of the Latin text, sent out by the royal record office to Gloucestershire in 1217 and most likely housed at St. Peter’s Abbey (now Gloucester Cathedral). Seventeen vintage originals still survive from the 13th century, including the manuscript that will be shown at the Legion of Honor.

A landscape-format sheet of parchment roughly sixteen inches wide and twelve inches high, the Magna Carta contains fifty-six lines of hand-inscribed Latin text, and the green wax seal of William Marshal the elder, a guardian of the boy King Henry III, who was then in power. It remains to this day one of the world’s great symbols of freedom and the rule of law. Its declaration that no free man should be imprisoned without due process underlies the development of common law in England and the concepts of individual liberty and constitutional government that created the United States.

Credit Line
On loan from the Bodleian Libraries, University of Oxford, and made possible thanks to the generosity of Qualcomm, Irwin and Joan Jacobs, and John Wiley and Sons.”

Ego mos animadverto vos illice!

The Daily Bus Showdown Between MUNI and Coach USA – Conflict on 34th Avenue in the Richmond District

Friday, February 4th, 2011

The road to our Legion of the Museum of Honor from Clement, well, it’s narrow. That means that there’s not much room for traffic when cars are parked on both sides of the street

Coach USA had the size but MUNI wanted it more:

Click to expand

In this particular case, after minutes of humming and hawing and the use of extended hands as makeshift yardsticks, the drivers agreed to pass each other simultaneously, slowly but surely.

Another win-win in the world-class natural amphitheatre that is San Francisco! Hurray!

In related news, Pulp Fashion: The Art of Isabelle de Borchgrave is almost upon us.

C’mon, Google Maps – Our Legion of Honor Museum is in San Joser? Nope! Golden Gate Park? Strike Two!

Friday, February 4th, 2011

C’mon, Google – I know you know where the Legion of Honor Museum is.

And I don’t know what I have to do with zip code 95110. (Sounds so far away, so far, away…)

You’re better than this, G:

Click to expand

In closing, C’mon!

In related news, Pulp Fashion: The Art of Isabelle de Borchgrave is almost upon us.

Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco Announce Plans for 2011 – Lots Coming from the de Young and Legion Museums

Friday, January 7th, 2011

See you after the jump for all the deets.

“San Francisco, January 2011––John E. Buchanan, Jr., the director of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, announces a diverse roster of upcoming exhibitions in 2011 at the de Young and Legion of Honor.  Dates are subject to change. For access to the most current schedule of exhibitions, please consult the FAMSF website”

And here’s a sneak peek:

Pablo Picasso, Portrait of Dora Maar, 1937, Oil on canvas, Musée National Picasso, Paris, Photo: Jean-Gilles Berizzi/Réunion des Musée Nationaux/Art Resource, New York, © 2010 Estate of Pablo Picasso/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

All the deets:


The de Young Plus the Legion of Honor Equals FAMSF – A Family Portrait of Our Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco

Wednesday, December 1st, 2010

On the left up high surrounded by Lincoln Park Golf Links is our Legion of Honor Museum and on the right down low surrounded by Golden Gate Park is our de Young Museum.

Visit one and then you can get general admission the other on the same day for free – that’s how it works.

Click to expand

Hamon Tower FeverCatch It

The de Young Museum’s New Textile Show – To Dye For: A World Saturated in Color

Tuesday, August 3rd, 2010

The newest show upstairs at the de Young Museum is To Dye For: A World Saturated in Color.

Learn all about this new exhibit from ArtDaily, ArtKnowledgeNews, the SF Museum Examiner, and here’s the slideshow.

FAMSF Textile Curator Jill D’Alessandro welcomes you:

An ikat trench coat from Oscar de La Renta’s 2005 collection – see where he got his inspiration from?

Coca-Cola Kimono, Yoshiko Wada, 1975. Cotton and silk:

Can you see the wood grain from the wooden clamp on this fabric?

All right, see you there!

July 31, 2010 – January 9, 2011

To Dye For features over 50 textiles and costumes from the Fine Arts Museums’ comprehensive collection of textiles from Africa, Asia and the Americas. A truly cross-cultural presentation, the exhibition showcases objects from diverse cultures and historical periods, including a tie-dyed mantle from the Wari-Nasca culture of pre-Hispanic Peru (500–900 A.D.), a paste-resist Mongolian felt rug from the 15th–17th century and a group of stitch-resist dyed 20th-century kerchiefs from the Dida people of the Ivory Coast. These historical pieces are contrasted with artworks from contemporary Bay Area artists. The exhibition highlights several recent acquisitions, including important gifts such as a pair of ikat-woven, early-20th-century women’s skirts from the Iban people of Sarawak, Malaysia and two exquisite hand-painted and mordant-dyed Indian trade cloths used as heirloom cloths by the Toraja peoples of Sulawesi, Indonesia.

Credit Line 

To Dye For: A World Saturated in Color is organized by the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco and supported by Olive and Bruce Baganz, Dr. Donald Breyer, Mary F. Connors, Dr. Guido Goldman, Harry and Diane Greenberg, Thomas Murray, Francesca Passalacqua and Don Ed Hardy, S. Peter Poullada and Nancy Sheppard, San Francisco Tribal, and Fifi White. Additional support provided by Britex Fabrics, Judith and Reed Content, Barbara and Dolph Shapiro, and Peter and Beverly Sinton.

Know Your FAMSF Acquisitions: “Absinthe Drinkers” by Jean-François Raffaëlli

Wednesday, June 23rd, 2010

Our Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco is crowing today about its latest acquisition: The Absinthe Drinkers (Les buveurs d’absinthe), 1881, by French painter Jean-François Raffaëlli (1850–1924).

Get all the deets, below.

Image: Jean-François Raffaëlli, The Absinthe Drinkers (Les buveurs d’absinthe), 1881, oil on canvas, 42 ½ x 42 ½ inches

All the deets:

San Francisco, California, June 2010––Coincidentally timed with the special exhibition Birth of Impressionism at the de Young Museum, John E. Buchanan, Jr., the director of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, announces the acquisition of The Absinthe Drinkers (Les buveurs d’absinthe), 1881, by the French painter Jean-François Raffaëlli (1850–1924). Widely regarded as one of the artist’s most important and accomplished paintings, The Absinthe Drinkers will temporarily grace the entrance of the Birth of Impressionism exhibition this summer before settling into its permanent home in gallery 19 at the Legion of Honor. 

The rest of the deets, after the jump.