Posts Tagged ‘farallon islands’

The “World’s Most Rodent-Packed Island” is in San Francisco – When Will We Let the Feds Kill the Mice on South Farallon?

Tuesday, December 17th, 2013

Here we go, from the USA Today from a few months back:

“Those suffering from musophobia would be wise to steer clear of the South Farallon Islands. The archipelago, which sits just 27 miles off San Francisco, is the most rodent-dense island in the world, with an average of 500 Eurasian house mice occupying each of its 120 acres (that’s 60,000 total).”

Now I’ll tell you, I have had it with these motherfucking mice on this motherfucking island.

So why don’t we finally get rid of them, like this:

South Farallon Islands Invasive House Mouse Eradication Project: Revised Draft Environmental Impact Statement

(That’s posted on a either pro-mouse or anti-mouse website – I just can’t tell and don’t really care.)

A few years back, up in Alaska, the Feds killed off all the rats on Rat Island in the Rat Island Group:

THE RAT ISLAND RAT ERADICATION PROJECT: A CRITICAL EVALUATION OF NONTARGET MORTALITY - Final report issued December 2010

See? That was a huge success. Now the chopper pilots were nervous up there ’cause a big storm was coming so they wanted to bug out of there with a quickness so they didn’t follow their marching orders very well so more bald eagles died than was necessary. But they killed all the rats on Rat Island, hurray!

All we need to do is nothing. Then the feds can get off their asses and start killing all the mice.

“More study” is NOT needed.

That’s your update.

A relatively fog-free day in the Sunset District.

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Through the tinted glass of the ginourmous windows of Yelp-rated Sava Pool

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From a higher sperspective in the Twin Peaks area, on an exceptionally clear morning.

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Can you see the lighthouse on the top of South East Farallon Island?

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Noisy Canon 10D at 840mm, from Christmas Tree Point Road, a skosh more than 30 miles away…

The Feds Don’t Know Jack About Solyndra or the Central Subway, But They DO Know How to Kill Mice on the Farallones

Monday, October 17th, 2011

Obviously, non-targeted species will be affected when the Feds airbomb the Farallon Islands with rodenticide to kill all those mice.

Like this one. See it? Here’s the big version, via nature photographer Jenny Erbes.

But so what. What’s the deal?

This is one of the things that the feds do right.

Like, they were so effective up north not too long ago that Rat Island will need a new name after 229 years.

So, hurry up Feds, we’re waiting on you…

Alaska’s Rat Island is Free of Rats after 229 Years, So Why Can’t Our Farallon Islands be Free of Rodents as Well?

Wednesday, May 18th, 2011

You see, the Feds had a plan to kill the famous rats of Rat Island, Alaska and they did that, with extreme prejudice, just a few years back.

See? No more Japanese rats from that shipwreck of the 18th century:

Click to expand

So why can’t the Feds do the same thing with our Farallon Islands?

Get cracking, Feds.

Oh Marin, You So Crazy (OMYSC)! Saving the Non-Native, Bird-Killing Siberian House Mice of the Farallon Islands

Tuesday, May 10th, 2011

You know, one of these days, I’ll start a half-assed non-profit, pay myself a six-figure salary, put the wife on staff, hire the kids too, put cute animal pictures on the homepage to keep the cash coming in – whew, good times.

Anyway, unrelated to that, srsly, comes now WildCare Bay Area to object to the Feds’ plans to airdrop a couple tons of poison on the Farallones (or Farallon Islands, (Spanish for pillars or “rocky outcrop,” see comments)) to kill the thousands of resident, non-native house mice what eat the eggs of endangered native birds.

Like this one. See it? Here’s the big version, via nature photographer Jenny Erbes.

Via Los Farallones

All right, enough of Marin, let’s hear from the people on the scene:

Dec 31, 2010
In general, however, it is known that owls are an opportunistic eater, feasting on the introduced house mice, but also preying upon songbirds, small seabirds (such as the ashy storm-petrel), beetles, and other terrestrial invertebrates …

May 25, 2010
While they rate very high on the cuteness quotient, overwintering Burrowing Owls are major predators of storm petrels during the spring, after abundant housemice have their seasonal population crash. Western Gulls also take many storm …
Feb 19, 2007
In 1969, south farallon was declared a national wildlife refuge. the lighthouse was automated in 1972, ending 117 years of continuous occupation. the last rabbit and cat were removed from the islands in 1974…

In closing, Marin, You So Crazy!

A relatively fog-free day in the Sunset District.

img_8252-copy

Through the tinted glass of the ginourmous windows of Yelp-rated Sava Pool

go8f8154-copy

From a higher sperspective in the Twin Peaks area, on an exceptionally clear morning.

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Can you see the lighthouse on the top of South East Farallon Island?

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Noisy Canon 10D at 840mm, from Christmas Tree Point Road, a skosh more than 30 miles away…

From the Cal Academy, Farallon Island Wildlife Webcam Kicks Off June 8

Wednesday, June 3rd, 2009

Mark your calendar and get your popcorn – soon you’ll be able  while away those lazy afternoons at work glued to the images you’ll see from the “FIRST EVER WEBCAM TO STREAM LIVE FOOTAGE FROM THE FARALLON NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE.”

“Just in time for the first annual World Oceans Day, the first ever webcam on the Farallon National Wildlife Refuge will go live on June 8 at http://www.calacademy.org/webcams/farallones/ Powered by solar energy and perched on a windswept lighthouse on top of Southeast Farallon Island, the webcam will provide an unprecedented view of the seabirds, seals, and possibly even sharks that call these isolated islands home.

“The live webcam feed will be accompanied by animal identification guides, Farallones history, and research and conservation information. This exciting new initiative is made possible through a cooperative partnership between the California Academy of Sciences, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and PRBO Conservation Science.”

It’s going to be mega.

See all them sharks and boids? Well, maybe not, but this is a relatively fog-free day in the Sunset District. Until the new webcam came along, this was as close as you could could get to the Farallones.

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Through the tinted glass of the ginourmous windows of Yelp-rated Sava Pool

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From a higher perspective in the Twin Peaks area, on an exceptionally clear morning.

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Can you see the lighthouse on the top of South East Farallon Island? That’s the site of the new webcam:

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Noisy Canon 10D at 840mm, from Christmas Tree Point Road, a skosh more than 30 miles away

That will have to do you until Monday.

Remember their promise: “possibly even sharks.”

FIRST EVER WEBCAM TO STREAM LIVE FOOTAGE FROM THE FARALLON NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE
Cooperative partnership between California Academy of Sciences, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and PRBO Conservation Science allows Web users to follow the action on the largest seabird colony in the continental United States

SAN FRANCISCO (May 27, 2009) – Just in time for the first annual World Oceans Day, the first ever webcam on the Farallon National Wildlife Refuge will go live on June 8 at www.calacademy.org/webcams/farallones. Powered by solar energy and perched on a windswept lighthouse on top of Southeast Farallon Island, the webcam will provide an unprecedented view of the seabirds, seals, and possibly even sharks that call these isolated islands home. The live webcam feed will be accompanied by animal identification guides, Farallones history, and research and conservation information. This exciting new initiative is made possible through a cooperative partnership between the California Academy of Sciences, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and PRBO Conservation Science.

Located 27 miles west of San Francisco, the Farallon National Wildlife Refuge is composed of three island groups that are home to the largest seabird colony in the continental United States. Approximately 250,000 seabirds representing 13 species and five species of seals and sea lions use the islands. Gray whales, blue whales, and humpback whales migrate past the islands every year. The area is also an important feeding ground for great white sharks. The refuge was established in 1909 by President Theodore Roosevelt as a preserve and breeding ground for native birds.

More deets after the jump.

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