Posts Tagged ‘fee’

This Type of Person is Why “Bay Area Bike Share” has a Very Low 1.9 Star Yelp Rating

Tuesday, March 28th, 2017

Now you’d think Frisco’s tourists would love love love an area taxpayer and feepayer-subsidized bicycle rental service with stations all over touristed areas like Market Street.

But some don’t because they get confused about the confusing pricing scheme, and they think wow, $9 for 24 hours? Man, we’re going to ride on out to Ocean Beach, whoo hoo!

But then it turns out that your credit card gets charged like low three-figures, because you didn’t check in your bikes every 30 minutes.

These bikes, coming back inbound from the West Side, where there are no BABS stations, are overdue and on the clock. They have exceeded their 15-minute combat radius:

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And then our tourists rage against BABS the only way they know how – on the Yelp.

Read and learn.

And this is still going on, in 2017.

The “solution” to this issue is that you get an automatic 50% refund just for asking.

Not much of a solution.

Out of gas already, trying to come up from the Great Highway through Golden Gate Park on a $1200 (if you lose it, or don’t check it back in entirely properly, but that’s another story) very heavy, electric motor-free, single-speed bike, about seven miles from where it was checked oot, eh?

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Oh well…

Frisco Newcomer Parks in the Yellow Zone on Sansome – Then Look What Happened

Friday, March 3rd, 2017

So that’s a $95 yellow zone ticket, but the real damage is the tow fee (including the dolly fee, natch), the SFMTA administrative fee, and potentially, storage and transfer fees. So IDK, will that add up to $800? Maybe more, maybe less

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Yellow zones are for active freight loading and unloading only by commercial vehicles. Check nearby signs or stencils on the curb for effective hours. Vehicles without a commercial license plate parked in a yellow zone will be cited and can be towed if the sign specifies it is a tow zone.”

Welcome to Frisco.

Stop It Hertz: “Herrera Sues Hertz for Bilking Customers with Hidden Golden Gate Bridge ‘Toll Service’ Fees”

Thursday, March 2nd, 2017

(Headline from college boy Jonathan Rauch.)

And here’s the press release:

“Herrera sues Hertz for bilking customers with hidden Golden Gate Bridge ‘toll service’ fees

Thousands of unwitting Hertz customers routinely charged $32.25 for a single bridge crossing. Case brought to counter long-standing problem and compensate victims.

SAN FRANCISCO (March 2, 2017) — City Attorney Dennis Herrera today sued the Hertz Corporation and its business partner for misleading customers and engaging in unlawful, unfair and fraudulent business practices by charging steep fees for a “toll service” to unwitting rental car customers who cross the Golden Gate Bridge.

Hertz is fraudulently and deceptively inducing its customers who drive across San Francisco’s iconic Golden Gate Bridge to purchase an “optional” toll service called PlatePass, according to the lawsuit Herrera filed Wednesday, March 1, in San Francisco Superior Court.

On other California toll bridges, PlatePass is an optional service that permits Hertz customers to bypass cash toll lanes and use the faster electronic FasTrak lanes without having to establish a FasTrak account.

But on the Golden Gate Bridge, ever since it went cashless four years ago, Hertz customers neither choose the service, nor receive sufficient notice to avoid it. They neither receive its supposed benefits, nor consent to its charges. Instead, by simply driving over the Golden Gate Bridge a single time, as millions of tourists do each year, Hertz customers are charged not only the undiscounted toll rate of $7.50, but up to $24.75 in extra fees. For many customers, that means a $32.25 bill to cross the bridge one time — more than four times the toll rate.

Worse, Hertz does not charge and disclose these fees on the receipt it provides to customers upon the close of the rental, but instead provides its customers’ confidential personal credit card information to a third party who slips in the charge at a later date.

“These practices are not only unfair; they’re unlawful,” Herrera said. “Rather than Hertz putting you in the driver’s seat, they’re taking their customers to the cleaners. I am not going sit back and allow one of the largest rental car companies on the planet to take advantage of a world-renowned San Francisco icon to rip off thousands of California visitors and residents. This lawsuit is designed to put a stop to this illegal scheme and force the companies involved to pay their victims back.”

(more…)

A Tale of Two Gas Stations, One Charging 27% per Gallon More Than the Other at the Same Location, Market and Castro – “RC” v. Chevron

Monday, October 3rd, 2016

You’ve tried the soda, now try some gasoline:

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Much cheaper than the Chevron across the street, unless you’re using a credit card, in which case you’re paying the same.

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America – what a country!

“Evening Flat Rate Parking” at a Skid Row Holiday Inn South of Market on 8th Street is Now $45

Friday, August 5th, 2016

South of Market skid row:

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Vox Populi:

unsafe neighborhood

on the corner of Crack Den Ave, and Homeless Urine Drive

my car in a lot that states ‘DO NOT LEAVE VALUABLES IN CAR’ all over the place (which gives you an indication of how safe this part of town is)

The 5th Anniversary of the SFMTA’s Proposed “Transportation Utility Fee” – Or, Why the SFMTA Doesn’t Feel Sorry for You After Towing Your Car

Wednesday, February 10th, 2016

Here you go:

Why is Towing So Expensive in San Francisco? By Farida Jhabvala – KQED News

And here’s the gritty nitty:

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See that? San Francisco County charges more than anybody. Why? Because it can.

And actually, it thinks you’re the deadbeat – I’ll explain.

What the SFMTA really wants is a steady supply of unlimited money, so that it doesn’t have to do anything it doesn’t want to, so that it can continue to hire and spend and hire and spend regardless of how it performs. The way to do that is to charge you hundreds of dollars a year, whether or not you ever ride on MUNI and even if you never violate any of the SFMTA’s parking rules.

The mechanism is called the “Transportation Utility Fee,” as described by Will Reisman here.

Of course, back then they were talking about $180 per year, but now we’ve got to pay for our share of the Central Subway (To Nowhere, still) and ever increasing overhead, so I think we’re talking about $250 per year with a built-in increase of like 10%, or, better yet, 9.9%.

I’m not saying we’re going to see the TUF soon, or ever, actually. What I’m saying is that this is what the SFMTA people think they deserve for being the all-knowing, all-seeing bureaucracy it thinks it is.

So if you complain about getting towed, our City Family thinks, “Well, gee, we should probably be towing you EVERY YEAR.” You know, so the SFMTA can get more money, for free.

So that’s why the SFMTA Doesn’t Feel Sorry for You After Towing Your Car and charging you the highest administrative towing fee of all of America’s 3000-something counties…

The Towman Cometh: The Great Towing of the Western Addition Starts This Saturday Night – Thanks, NIKE!

Thursday, October 15th, 2015

IMO, Nike should make sure that these types of signs hit the streets like six days before the annual Nike Womens 13.1-Mile Marketing Effort

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(Interesting font there, SFMTA!)

The way things stand now, notice is insufficient.

IMO.

(The person who will tow your ride Sunday morning will live south of SF, and have bible verses cited on the side of his tow truck, if Past Is Prologue.)

Just Asking: Does the SFMTA Give Sufficient Notice of Its New Fee / Tax to Credit / Debit Card Users?

Tuesday, August 25th, 2015

I don’t really park at parking meters so I don’t know if this photo shows the first notice our SFMTA gives users of it’s new credit card tax:

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(Of course, such surcharges are generally banned under CA law (CCC section 1748.1), except the law has a few loopholes, one of which the SFMTA might have taken advantage of, having to do with being a government entity, IDK.)

Anywho, here’s what the Visa People have to say about credit card surcharges:

“If retailers intend to impose a surcharge on credit card purchases, they are required to notify customers before customers make an actual purchase at the store entrance and at the point of sale – or in an online environment, on the first page that references credit card brands.”

IDK, perhaps the horrible SFMTA is, as per usual, operating under a different set of rules, under rules different those at most places where you use your credit card…

You Can Enter the Japanese Tea Garden for Free Three Hours Each Week, But the New Signs Don’t Tell You – Why’s That?

Thursday, June 4th, 2015

Here’s the old sign out in front of the JTG in GGP –  it was there going all the way back to aught-six:

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And here’s the new sign, which is the same except now the free hours are kept secret:

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I guess advertising the free hours on a big sign out front attracted too many skinflints?

Looks that way.

Now back in the day, they’d let you linger after closing hours, but no longer. So you now can’t see the frolicking skunks of after-hours at the JTG

Oh well, that’s Progress for you.

An “Urbanist’s” Dream: Here’s Your Chance to Help Plan the Future of the Clipper Card – It’s “FutureOfClipper.Org”

Tuesday, December 2nd, 2014

I had a Clipper Card once. Well, a TransLink, the Clipper’s predecessor. Turns out it couldn’t handle a little acetone:

And now I have no Clipper Cards, AFAIK

But you, you love the (somewhat racist?) Clipper. So why not help the MTC try to make it better?

All the deets:

“Help Plan the Future of Clipper – MTC and Bay Area Transit Agencies Invite Public Input

OAKLAND, Calif., Dec. 1, 2014 /PRNewswire/ — Where would you like to use Clipper, and how would you like to use it? That’s what the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC) and Bay Area transit agencies want to know.

Clipper is the transit fare payment system for the San Francisco Bay Area and is currently accepted for payment on 13 transit agencies. The reloadable card was launched in 2006. Today, the system has more than 1.4 million cards in circulation and is used for more than 700,000 daily trips.

Whether you use Clipper right now or not, you can provide valuable feedback that will help MTC and its partner agencies design the fare payment system that best serves Bay Area transit riders.

Visit futureofclipper.com and click the link to take a survey to provide your feedback. You can also share your experiences with Clipper and what you’d like to see in the future via email at feedback@futureofclipper.com or via voicemail at 510.817.5680.

Clipper is a service provided by Bay Area transit operators and the Metropolitan Transportation Commission, the transportation planning, financing and coordinating agency for the nine-county San Francisco Bay Area.

Note: Clipper is accepted on AC Transit, BART, Caltrain, Fairfield-Suisun Transit (FAST), Golden Gate Transit and Ferry, Marin Transit, Muni, SamTrans, San Francisco Bay Ferry, SolTrans, Vacaville City Coach, VINE and VTA.”