Posts Tagged ‘file’

Beverage Update: Say Good-Bye to Those Fruity Forties, Those Ubiquitous 23.5-Ounce Cans of Four-Loko

Tuesday, October 11th, 2011

The upshot of last week’s big news is that the FTC wants you all to treat 4-Loko as something you’d be pouring into cups to share instead of you bogarting a huge can just for yourself.

These cans, which actually have more alcohol than a forty, aren’t resealable, so they’re destined for Hell:

Click to expand

All the deets:

“FTC Requires Packaging Changes for Fruit-Flavored Four Loko Malt Beverage - Marketer of Supersized, High-Alcohol Beverage Agrees to Stop Allegedly Deceptive Claims to Settle FTC Charges

The marketers of Four Loko have agreed to re-label and repackage the supersized, high-alcohol, fruit-flavored, carbonated malt beverage, to resolve Federal Trade Commission charges of deceptive advertising.

The FTC alleges that Phusion Projects, LLC and its principals falsely claimed that a 23.5-ounce, 11 or 12 percent alcohol by volume can of Four Loko contains alcohol equivalent to one or two regular 12-ounce beers, and that a consumer could drink one can safely in its entirety on a single occasion.

In fact, according to the FTC, one can of Four Loko contains as much alcohol as four to five 12-ounce cans of regular beer and is not safe to drink on a single occasion. Consuming a single can of Four Loko on a single occasion constitutes “binge drinking,” which is defined by health officials as men drinking five (and women drinking four) or more standard alcoholic drinks in about two hours.

“Deception about alcohol content is dangerous to consumers, and it’s a serious concern for the FTC,” said David Vladeck, Director of the agency’s Bureau of Consumer Protection. “Four Loko contains as much alcohol as four or five beers, but it is marketed as a single-serving beverage.”

The 23.5-ounce Four Loko cans are the size of about two regular beer cans and are non-resealable. The FTC complaint alleged that on one company website, consumers were encouraged to enter a “photo contest” in which they posted many photos of people drinking directly from the 23.5-ounce Four Loko cans. In stocking instructions, Phusion urged merchants to place the cans where other refrigerated, single-serve alcoholic beverages are displayed.

The administrative settlement requires Phusion Projects to include disclosures on containers of Four Loko, or any other flavored malt beverage containing more alcohol than two and-a-half regular beers, stating how much alcohol – compared to the amount of alcohol found in regular beer – is in the drink. The order also specifies the location and appearance of the disclosure. For example, the disclosure for a 23.5 ounce can of Four Loko with 12 percent alcohol by volume would state: “This can has as much alcohol as 4.5 regular (12 oz. 5% alc/vol) beers.”

Starting six months after the settlement takes effect, Phusion Projects is required to use only resealable containers for flavored malt beverages that have more alcohol than the equivalent of two and a half regular beers.

Also, the settlement bars Phusion Projects from misrepresenting the alcohol content of any beverage, and from depicting people drinking directly from the container of any product containing more alcohol than that found in two and a half regular beers.”

Ever more deets after the jump.

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[This is good]: Just What is the Mysterious FilePile.org Website All About?

Thursday, June 5th, 2008

No, not the moribund Filepile.com, we’re talking about the very secretive, very active Filepile.org. If you mention the name of their URL, some of these secretive people just might come after you, as Laura K. discovered:

“Now I’m receiving nasty emails from this filepile crew. Apparently I had the audacity to mention their secret sandbox in public and it made them cry.”

What does the site look like? How about this (minus the kitteh)? Or this screenshot from when they “went spooky” last Halloween:

image001.jpg

These thousands of Filepilers might practically control the Internets and yet some of them claim they’re “not notable”? It seems Anil Dash got close to the truth while ago, but can we rely on what he says? Many private organizations have Wiki entries, but not Filepile.org. Why’s that?

[Update: A certain Mr. Jacob I. has offered to hand over a valid user name and password for filepile but only in person and at some hard-to-find street in Burlingame (of all places). Frank says he has plenty of gas and he’s sure he can find the place, so we’re heading down there now. Wish us luck!]

[ReUpdate: Well we never found that place in San Mateo County. The address didn’t show up on Google Maps and the directions we had wound us up at McGraw’s Grocery. Frank said the whole deal was a “bum steer.” Man,  looks like it’s going to be tough to get a password. Oh well. We made the best of it by having dinner at Joanie’s “Happy Days” Diner (did ABC license this name?) and then ended up at the loungey Vinyl Room. B’Game rocks! (but “JacobY” sucks :(). Frank said the FPers would probably launch a “Dawes’ Attack” to take down my “crappy little WordPress.” But let’s worry about that tomorrow!] [Maltese Falcon references=OFF]

[Captain’s Log, supplemental: So Filepile.org could be described as a cross between Digg and craigslist. You have an old-school interface (like craigslist) that shows interesting links, but there’s also a rating system (like Digg) that allows users to easily get to the good stuff. Self-policing serves to prevent too much snooping from the RIAA or the (American) Feds. Filepile.org has perhaps 10,000 accountholders with a few thousand especially active members. The reason why evidence of such an active site doesn’t show up anywhere, is that filepile.org rejects robots crawling all over it, which is fair enough. The reason why they don’t have a Wikipedia entry is that FPers will sign up for a Wiki account just to say how FP shouldn’t be on the Wiki. Mystery solved. Carry on, my wayward sons (you got to wait for the good part, just like on this one)]

Domo arigatou (Mr. Roboto)
Mata o-hima de
Domo arigatou (Mr. Roboto)
Himitsu wo shiritai