Posts Tagged ‘firefighters’

It Takes a Village of SFFD to Fight a Fire at 1918 Divisadero – Being Remodeled – Worth $1.3 Mil, One Bathroom

Monday, July 16th, 2012

I don’t know, this seemed like a big deal on Saturday but I passed by yesterday and couldn’t even tell that there’d been a fire.

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A $1.3 million place with just one bathroom?

OK fine.

The Feds Spank Our San Francisco Fire Department Over the Deaths of Vincent Perez and Anthony Valerio in June 2011

Thursday, May 10th, 2012

If you want, you can compare what the SFFD has said about last year’s disaster with what independent federal investigators have recently said:

A Career Lieutenant and Fire Fighter/Paramedic Die in a Hillside Residential House Fire – California

“Occupational injuries and fatalities are often the result of one or more contributing factors or key events in a larger sequence of events. NIOSH investigators identified the following items as key contributing factors in this incident that ultimately led to the fatalities:

  • Construction features of the house built into a steep sloping hillside
  • Natural and operational horizontal ventilation
  • Ineffective size-up
  • Fire fighters operating above the fire
  • Ineffective fire command communications and progress reporting
  • Lack of a personnel accountability system.”
The report is pretty detailed:
And here are some recommendations from the Feds:

“Recommendation #1: Fire departments should ensure that standard operating guidelines (SOGs) are developed and implemented for hillside structures.

During this incident, the E26 officer knew the fire was below him but he was unaware of just how many floors.  If an adequate size-up had been conducted, or had the E26 officer obtained more intelligence information from the resident of the home that he spoke to briefly upon arrival, it may have facilitated a more rapid determination of the location of the fire floor. 

Recommendation #2: Fire departments should ensure that an adequate size-up of the fire structure is conducted prior to crews making entry.

In this incident, if an effective size-up would have been conducted several factors may have changed the first arriving companies’ tactics.  The B side door would have been an option for initial entry. If the small window below the front door would have been noticed perhaps the fire could have been seen on the basement floor; or if more intelligence information would have been gathered from the occupant initially they could have identified that the fire was on the basement floor and how to access the floor.

Recommendation #3: Fire departments should ensure staffing levels are maintained.

During this incident, E32 was originally assigned as RIC then re-assigned fire fighting duties to back up E11.  E20 was dispatched as RIC but did not arrived on scene until after the victims were recovered.

Recommendation #4: Fire departments should ensure that a personnel accountability system is established early and utilized at all incidents.

In this incident, BC6 and the IC tried to radio E26 with no response and it was assumed they were with BC9 or that BC9 knew what they were doing.  An additional supporting component to fireground accountability is frequent progress reporting.  When the IC fails to get a response after 3 attempts, or he receives a garbled response, action must be taken to determine the crew’s status.  A worst case scenario must be assumed until their status can be confirmed. 

Recommendation #5: Fire departments should ensure that fireground operations are coordinated with consideration given to the effect horizontal ventilation has on the air flow, smoke, and heat flow through the structure.

At this incident, the officer on E26 realized that they had a fire somewhere in the structure, probably underneath them.  The victims from E26 had deployed a 1¾” hoseline to the ground floor of the structure attempting to locate the fire. BC9 came into the structure and met them during their investigation of the ground floor. Victim #1 advised BC9 that the fire was underneath them.  BC9 agreed to this and decided to take a crew down side B and attack the fire through the exterior doorway on side B at the basement level.  BC9 and the IC discussed and agreed on this tactic.  E26 did not receive any further instructions and did not leave the structure but attempted to go to the basement via the interior stairs.  E26 did not provide any radio reports to the fire attack group supervisor (BC9) or the IC of their location or actions.  

When an incident transitions from an investigation mode to an offensive fire attack mode, the IC should ensure that all companies have and understand their assignments, and are accounted for in the Personnel Accountability System.  This information should be collected on a tactical worksheet to ensure that all companies have an assignment and are accounted for.

Recommendation #6: Fire departments should ensure that the Incident Commander is provided a chief’s aide at all structure fires.

In this incident, a chief’s aide may have helped the IC to establish and manage the tactical worksheet early in the incident, track the deployment location of the E26 crew, and monitor transmissions on the fireground channels.

Recommendation #7: Fire departments should ensure that an incident safety officer is assigned to all working structure fires.

In this incident, for the size of the fire department and responsible coverage area, there is an insufficient number of incident safety officers (ISO) and/or qualified personnel (certified to NFPA 1521) to act as an ISO within the fire department. The ISO should be of a rank worthy of the significant responsibility.”

27th Annual Run Wild For A Child 5K and 10K a Huge Success in Golden Gate Park

Sunday, November 27th, 2011

Run Wild for a Child 2011 went off without a hitch today in Golden Gate Park.

It’s sort of like the Bay to Breakers annual civic event, except Run Wild isn’t owned by some hung-up, Burnsian, “Christian Billionaire” what lives in Colorado and uses your B2B entry fee to fight the concept of evolution. (How refreshing.)

Anyway, today’s 5K race was 3053 vs. 1729 leading most of the way through. One of these guys won, you’d think.

Is this Fell? I can’t really tell:

Here’s Oak, anyway:

As you can see, this race swings both ways, with 5K and 10K runners facing each other at times:

Monkey butts?

All right, see you next year!

10K • 5K featuring Run Wild For A Child Costume Contest

Sunday, November 27, 2011 • 8:30 AM START
27th Annual Thanksgiving Weekend Run
Golden Gate Park • San Francisco

KICK OFF THE HOLIDAY SEASON

Support San Francisco Firefighters Toy Program
Bring a new toy or two to donate to Bay Area Children in need
Run dressed as a toy in the “Run Wild Like A Child Costume Contest”
PRE-POST RACE EXPO

The entire event is staged from the Music Concourse in Golden Gate Park, which is the outdoor plaza in the center of:

California Academy of Sciences
De Young Museum
Japanese Tea Garden
Start Check-In is at Music Concourse — see below for Start details.

‘RUN WILD LIKE A CHILD 5K’ COSTUME CONTEST

Run or Walk the 5K dressed as a favorite childhood toy to be eligible for the costume contest judging. Prizes will be awarded to the Top Ten Costumes selected by the Judges. Click to see some past year’s costumes!

CUSTOM MEDAL WITH EVENT LOGO TO 1ST – 10TH PLACE COSTUME WINNERS
1st Place: Luxury Weekend for Two at Hotel Carlton (good through Nov. 2012) and $150 Gift Certificate to Sports Basement
2nd Place: $200.00 Sports Basement Gift Certificate & FRS healthy Energy Gift Pack
3rd Place: $100.00 Sports Basement Gift Certificate & FRS healthy Energy Gift Pack
4th Place: $50.00 Sports Basement Gift Certificate & FRS healthy Energy Gift Pack
5th –10 Place: A Sports Basement Gift Certificate good for a pair of Brooks shoes.
COSTUME JUDGING

All 5K Costume Contestants should report to the front of the starting line for initial judging from 8:00 AM – 8:20 AM.

Initial judging at the starting line from 8:15 – 8:30 AM
Semi-final judging – at the 5K finish line.
Final judging – at Bandshell Stage at 10:00 AM
POST RACE EXPO

After the race join us in the Music Concourse where you can ‘get down’ with live music provided by Pure Ecstasy while enjoying refreshments and the final costume judging on the main stage. Entrants can pick up their T-shirt and goodie bag, as well as visit sponsor booths for free samples and fitness information. The awards ceremony and Costume Parade & Judging will begin at approximately 10:00 AM at the Bandshell.

T-SHIRT PICK-UP

Pre-registered entrants may pick up their T-shirt with the full color logo in the Post-Race Expo area from 7:00 AM to 8:15 AM race morning or immediately following the race. Race Day entrants can pick up their shirt immediately following the race. The T-shirt Booth will be closed from 8:16 AM – 8:45 AM. T-shirt sizes cannot be guaranteed.

SUPPORTING

The San Francisco Firefighter’s Toy Program is the city’s largest and the nation’s oldest program of its kind. Distributing over 200,000 toys to more than 40,000 disadvantaged children. Besides helping individual families in need, the Toy Program serves many community organizations, including shelters for abused women and children, inner-city schools, neighborhood groups, children’s cancer wards, and pediatric AIDS units. SFFF Toy Program also responds on a year round basis to displaced children who become victims of fires, floods and other such disasters. The SFFF Toy Program is dependent solely on donations.

BRING A TOY and/or MAKE A DONATION
The San Francisco Firefighter’s Toy Program will be onsite race day accepting donations of new unwrapped toys. Entrants are encouraged to bring a toy or two on race day to donate and/or to make a cash donation when you register. Any donation above your entry fee will be given to the San Francisco Firefighters Toy Program and is a 100% tax deductible.

Building Fire This AM at People’s Cafe and TRUE Clothing on Haight – They’ll be Shut Down for a While

Thursday, August 11th, 2011

Get all the deets on this morning’s 5:00 AM structure fire at The People’s Cafe and True in the Upper Haight.

Let’s see here, the aftermath: You’ve got a Honda Accord (see the firefighters gingerly lifting a big old hose off of it (sorry about that, Chief) so the driver can escape the scene?), a noticeably perky news lady, a news producer, a witness/interested party, and a big old firetruck all in front of TRUE and the People’s Cafe during Yet Another Foggy Morning in the Upper Haight, just as you might expect:

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Thanks once again, Guardians of the City. See you at Costco and Lucky!

This shot came from the side of a ladder truck parked on Fulton:

And area LEAs too, love the Dead, it seems…

Senator Leland Yee Introduces SB 220, A Bill Requiring Coverage for Tobacco Cessation

Friday, March 12th, 2010

Senator Leland Yee is today proposing a law that would require health insurance policies to include coverage for tobacco cessation services. He made the announcement today at San Francisco General Hospital along with all these people:

Supervisor Eric Mar
Dr. Mitch Katz, San Francisco Department of Public Health
Serena Chen, American Lung Association
John Hanley, San Francisco Firefighters
Dr. Dexter Louie, California Medical Association
Gail Maderis, BayBio
Dr. Steve Fugaro, San Francisco Medical Society
Karen Licavoli-Farnkopf, Breathe California

District 2 Supervisor Eric Mar talked about his parents, who both “smoked like crazy.”

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All the deets:

Bill Introduced to Require Insurance Companies Cover Tobacco Cessation. Senator Yee and Supervisor Mar team-up to sponsor legislation to fight cancer
 
SAN FRANCISCO – According the US Surgeon General, tobacco use is the single greatest cause of disease and premature death in America today and is responsible for more than 435,000 deaths annually, including nearly 40,000 in California alone. 

In an effort to fight this epidemic, Senator Leland Yee (D-San Francisco) today teamed-up with San Francisco Supervisor Eric Mar, the American Lung Association, doctors, and firefighters to introduce legislation that would mandate health insurance policies include coverage for tobacco cessation services such as patches, nasal sprays, inhalers, gum, prescription medications, and counseling.

“The societal costs of tobacco-related death and disease approach $96 billion annually in medical expenses and $97 billion in lost productivity nationwide,” said Yee.  “More then 70 percent of all current smokers, however, have expressed a desire to stop smoking.  By ensuring that health plans cover the cost of quitting, more Californians will be able to kick this bad habit, medical costs will be reduced, and most importantly, lives will be saved.”

In 2006, as part of its universal healthcare program, Massachusetts began covering most expenses for smoking cessation counseling and prescription drugs for Medicaid recipients. The result has been an astonishing drop in the population of poor people who smoke — from 38% to 28%. There is also evidence of a parallel reduction in hospitalization for heart attacks and treatments for asthma.

“Smoking disproportionately impacts those in economically disadvantaged communities,” said Mar, who is sponsoring a resolution in support of Yee’s bill.  “Requiring health care providers to include coverage for smokers who would like to quit smoking creates a healthier California and protects the public’s health.”

About 20 percent of adult Americans currently smoke, and 4,000 children and adolescents smoke their first cigarette each day.  According to the California Department of Public Health, the adult smoking rate in California is 14 percent and there are approximately 3.8 million current adult smokers in California.

“It’s time to make it easier for the nearly four million Californians who smoke, to quit,” said Jane Warner, President and CEO of the American Lung Association in California.  “Because, right now, we’re failing these people as highlighted by the ‘D’ grade earned in Cessation Coverage by the state in the American Lung Association’s recent State of Tobacco Control Report.”

“SB 220 takes another important step in the long journey of providing Californians the support and incentives they need to quit using tobacco products,” said Brennan Cassidy, M.D., president of the California Medical Association, which represents 35,000 physicians across the state. “Requiring health plans to cover smoking cessation treatment is a no-brainer. We know that when a person quits smoking it saves the health care system immensely by significantly reducing the chances of heart disease, lung cancer and other life-threatening diseases that require intensive, expensive treatment.”

“Smoking cessation is more cost-effective than other common and insurance-covered disease prevention interventions, such as high blood pressure and high cholesterol treatment and routine cancer screenings,” said Yee.  “Consumers need and deserve this treatment option.”

With SB 220, California would become the 8th state to mandate coverage for tobacco cessation services.  In addition to the American Lung Association, Yee’s bill is supported by the California Medical Association, California Psychological Association, San Francisco Firefighters Local 798, San Francisco Medical Society, National Council of Asian & Pacific Islander Physicians, and the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, AFL-CIO.

San Francisco Fire Department Turns City Hall into a Winter Wonderland

Tuesday, December 8th, 2009

You know, for kids.

The Toy Detail of the SFFD must have worked overtime to deliver all the snow to the steps of San Francisco City this morning

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Green4Now has photos, from before the time the kids showed up.