Posts Tagged ‘fixed’

OMG, Our Bloated SFMTA was Simply Too Busy to Process Faxed Citation Protests, So It Shut Off Its Fax Machine?

Tuesday, October 13th, 2015

Here’s your lede, buried:

“When Fixed began faxing its submissions to SFMTA last year, the agency emailed the startup to stop using their fax machine. When Fixed pointed out that it was legal to do so, the agency simply shut off their fax.”

All’s I know about Fixed is the first few posts here.

IDK, I was always skeptical of Fixed’s success percentage claims and, IMO, its employees / contractors should never have touched any official ticket placed on any car, but it’s sort of amusing to see how far our SFMTA will go to protect its big cash cow…

What the SFMTA really wants, in its dreams, is a household transit tax, what would cost you about $500 a year, whether you ride the MUNI or not, and then it wouldn’t have to begging for money as much, and then it wouldn’t have to pay so much heed to any random San Francisco Board of Supervisors Member, you know, fucking Supervisors…

Dream on, SFMTA. And until that day, WAKE UP, SFMTA:


Hurray! The Workers from FIXED, the Parking Ticket Fixing Startup, are No Longer Stapling Ads to Windshield Parking Tickets

Friday, January 16th, 2015

Back last year, people’d be stapling the ads for Fixed onto official SFMTA parking tickets.

I don’t know if they’ve given up on stapling altogether, but this paper clip is an encouraging sign

IMG_0265 (1) copy

Actually, I’d recommend that the profit-driven Fixed people not even touch an official SFMTA notice, but baby steps, baby steps.

So This New “Fixed” Company is Stapling Its Ads to SFMTA MUNI Parking Tickets – Is This Kosher?

Monday, August 18th, 2014

[UPDATE: Kevin Montgomery of ValleyWag has more on this topic. And yeah, at first I thought the the company was offering to pay the ticket out of its own pocket, but I don’t think that’s the case – it’s just an ad. Anyway, I’ll see if I can find another one of these ads to check all what it says. IMO, the first step after you get a ticket is figuring whether you deserved it or not. Well, were you blocking the street sweeper or not? Oh, you were? So why try to get the ticket “fixed?”]


Here’s how I found things on Ashbury, in situ, with this fresh ticket from area bureaucrat Ed Reiskin sitting on the street:

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So I’ll explain this company’s bidness model: You give it your SFMTA citation information and it’ll try to “fix” your ticket the way the SFPD famously fixes tickets for ineffectual Mayor Ed Lee.

But how did this ticket end up on the ground? Perhaps the owner thought s/he would simply pay online and then tossed the ticket? Or maybe the owner thought this windshield flier was just another windshield flier and so just tossed it on the ground? Or perhaps the Fixed person didn’t take care when trying to put the ticket back after stapling it to the ad?

I’ll tell you, I don’t think you’re supposed to be taking tickets off of cars, as they are required to be there before the SFMTA can take your money to keep for itself. (Of course sometimes a citation might fall off of a car on its own, but all the SFMTA is required to do is to try to notify the driver, and this effort is followed up by mail.)

What’ll be next to be stapled to your parking tickets – restaurant menus?

And what does this mean?

“Up to 50% of tickets are dismissed when challenged.”

I’ll tell you, up to 50% of the gold medals handed out in the most recent Olympics were awarded to me!

Yeah, that’s the ticket…

In conclusion, I cry foul over this ham-fisted marketing effort.

Flat-Hatting Over San Francisco in Your Aging Cessna SkyMonster

Monday, April 11th, 2011

If you’re flying over San Francisco less than 500 feet above the hills and trees and whatnot, then you’re flat-hatting.

And that’s not good, is it?

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Is this trip really necessary?

San Francisco’s World-Class Ship-Repair Capability Gets that Carnival Splendor Cruise Ship Working – And a Mystery Solved

Monday, February 28th, 2011

You know why that Carnival Splendor cruise ship got towed to a San Francisco dry dock all the way up from Fun Diego last month, you know why her owners chose the 415 as the place where she’d get a new engine and get a whole bunch of work done?

Because they didn’t really have a choice, that’s why. If your 300-yard+ vessel needs to come out of the briny somewhere in the Eastern Pacific, odds are you’ll bring it here. Hurray!

So, why did the fire in one engine room affect the other engine room? Answer here.

And did the passengers really eat airlifted Spam and Pop Tarts for three days? Not really. Answer here.

The view from our world-class San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge. (It’s only been two decades since that earthquake and we’re almost done fixing it up already!) Now-defunct Potrero Power Plant camera right:

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Anyway, the Splendor is loaded up and chugging towards Mexico, back OTJ.


Got Conspiracy? The Cabal That Keeps Milk Prices High in California

Tuesday, May 27th, 2008

So, the state of California won’t allow lower milk prices? Sure seems that way. Here’s how it looked at a San Francisco Lucky Supermarket the other day:


The Soviets over at the California Department of Food and Agriculture regulate milk prices? Yes, srsly.

You see, dairy farmers and the state of California like high milk prices. This cabal works together thusly:

California Dairy farmers want state to raise milk prices

Record milk price provides relief for dairies

Read the news and turn the pages:

Dairy Industry Crushed Innovator Who Bested Price-Control System


15-farm empire bucks industry

Not only does Food and Ag play a role in keeping milk prices high, they seem to relish offering excuses for their behaviour.



So, by the numbers:

4. Q: Why are milk prices regulated?
A: Another way to ask the same question is, “To what extent is governmental intervention still needed to achieve orderly marketing of dairy products?”

No, the way to ask the question is “why are milk prices regulated?” Or, why are milk prices so damn high? Or, why the hell is there a minimum price on milk? Answer: To please Big Dairy.

Next question:

5. Q: How do California’s milk standards differ from other states?
From the nutritionist’s standpoint, California’s fluid milk standard is healthier

No, the proper answer is “in a trivial fashion.” Why would California have such a minor difference in milk standards? To segment the market in order to please Big Dairy, that’s why.

Next question:

11. Q: How much does it cost to produce a gallon of milk?
Input costs, such as processing labor, delivery and raw product costs vary considerably.

Why on earth should the Kalifornia Kommisars even care about this issue?


Dairy Division on patrol, looking for illegal sales of low priced milk. 

The final outrage:

16. Q: Can outsourcing milk to other states reduce the retail price of milk?

Outsourcing“? Don’t they mean importing? Yes they do, but the word importing has a neutral point of view.

Thankfully, we’ve made it to the bottom of the FAQ page.

The California Department of Food and Agriculture is required to comply with the wishes of the Legislature and the Governor, of course. The mystery is why Food and Ag feels it necessary to defend the wishes of the Legislature and the Governor with this extremely bogus and self-serving FAQ page. The World Wonders.

(And if you like high milk prices, you’re going to love getting sprayed with crop dusters over your house this summer. BAM!

Fixed Gear Bike Riders Have a Tough Time On Hilly Haight Street

Tuesday, May 20th, 2008

Some fixed gear bike riders have it tough because they don’t have brakes on their bikes. So when they have to stop on the bottom of an incline they need to skid their rear tires. This leaves a loooong skid mark on the pavement, as you can see. 

Take a look at this awesome video here to get the idea. Some rydahs run into trouble though – like Tony here, who was “surprised” to encounter a bus, at a bus stop, on a bus route, in Manhattan.


Let’s be careful out there:

“The EMT said if it wasn’t for my dreads, I would have had a massive concussion

We’ll close with Morrissey’s thoughts on the matter:

“No brakes, I don’t mind.”