Posts Tagged ‘forced’

Corvette Bummer: The SFPD is _Really_ Stepping Up Enforcement of the “Mandatory Turn at Sixth and Market” Rule

Tuesday, November 1st, 2011

Sometimes, you’ll see three cars pulled over at the same time. It’s safe to say, “The Grace Period is Now Over.”

Now, what kind of person ignores the giant signs on inbound Market telling them to Turn Right Only?

The kind of person who has a greater tendency to lack a driver license or insurance or registration or registration hardcopy or registration decal. Oh well.

So, that’s life on the Streets of San Francisco these days.

This tike was not happy, that’s for sure:

Click to expand

What people tend to say to the SFPD is something like:

Well, how am I supposed to get to the Nordstrom?

The answer, involving the mention of Mission Street or Folsom, well that strikes our visitors as craaaaaazy.

So they conclude, if they hadn’t already, that it’s a hassle to drive about SoMA and Union Square and the FiDi.

Which it is.

And some of them vow to never come back.

Oh well.

Car-Free Market Street Now Enforced, Effectively, By Empty Police Cars

Tuesday, March 30th, 2010

This was the scene yesterday morning between Sixth and Seventh  – notice the lack of private vehicles?

There are two reasons, it appears, why people coming inbound on Market would obey the new-ish Right Turn Only signs at the intersections of Tenth and also Sixth streets now that the Parking Control Officers are gone.

The first has to do with the police cars parked on Market on Sixth. See the SFPD po-po car on the far right? And there’s another one parked just past Sixth, right in the field of view of drivers when they are deciding whether to risk getting a moving violation.   

Click to expand

So that’s 6th, now here’s 10th, where recent changes have made the prospect of driving on Market straight past 10th, something drivers have done for more than a century, untenable. There are about two dozen arrows staring you in the face and a huge orange and green “RIGHT TURN ONLY” flashing away. Plus there’s a Safe Hit post in the middle of the lane – that won’t bother fire truck drivers a whit but, private vehicle drivers, well, they’re not going to clunk-clunk over that post on a regular basis. 

That post plays a big role in getting cars to turn at Tenth but you can’t have the same setup at Sixth, which is a two-way street. I guess that’s where the police cars come in.

Now, I’ll tell you, a few days back I watched most of the inbound cars  on Market (like 70-something percent during seven light cycles) go straight. However, there were no police cars parked in the area at that time. Maybe that’s the difference.

Let’s wait and see how drivers behave in a month or so…

Car-Free Market Street Struggles – Sixth Street Turn Compliance Rate Close to Zero Percent

Friday, March 26th, 2010

First of all, there never was a car-free Market Street, even on the inbound lanes during the past six months when Sixth Street and a few other places were staffed with two(!) (and sometimes more!) Parking Control Officers who would encourage drivers to turn south into SoMA.

(I won’t miss them, personally, what with some of them parking their little Cushmans right where bikes are supposed to go and then oftentimes yakking to each other in the middle of the street, seemingly oblivious to traffic.)

And second of all, now that the PCO’s are gone, private vehicles on inbound Market just truck on by Sixth Street, ignoring the Right Turn Required signs.

As here. (That blue Camry looks like it’s turning right from Market but, in fact, just came from Golden Gate Ave.  across the intersection):

Particularly when you have a lead car illegally head on down Market, the cars behind tend to blindly follow. Car drivers are sheople. Oh well.

Sic Transit Gloria Chariot-free Venalicium Via

The “Co-Owner” of a Local Flying School Threatens This Very Blog

Tuesday, December 15th, 2009

Read below to see the message that came over the transom of this little blog yesterday, the very blog you’re looking at right now. It concerns a post from a year and half ago about an airplane crash-landing that resulted in no major injuries

The missive, in its entirety: 

“When you google Flying Vikings your false article comes up. If you do not fix your false statements. I will deal with you. My name is Celine Correa and I am a co-owner of Flying Vikings. You need to report on the many thousands and thousands of flight hours we have done. Call me and I will give you verifiable details no false hoods. You need to correct your article immediately.
 
Celine”

O.K. fine. If anybody wants to go through and find any of the purported “false statements,” well then have at it – that would help me out.

Otherwise, I don’t think I’ll be “reporting” on Flying Vikings’ “many thousands and thousands of flight hours” (is that a lot? My dad, currently pushing up daisies in Virginia, had five figures worth of flying hours with no accidents, AFAIK) in some sort of fairness-doctrine type of deal.

The comments are open on this post, if anyone wants to pipe up. Thanks for your help.

Here it is: 

Another Accident Involving Hayward-based Flying Vikings, Inc.

Today’s headlines include news of the crash landing of a Flying Vikings, Inc. Cessna 172 in Oakland, California.

The San Jose Mercury News earlier reported that N61736 ”had a gas leak,” but now is going with ”mechanical problems” as the cause of this incident. KCBS, which labels this single engine plane the KCBS Radio Traffic Plane, is reporting the pilot claimed the oil pressure guage plummetted just before the engine conked out. This aircraft, built in 1974, suffered “substantial damage” during an incident in 1981.  

The following language, written before today’s accident, appears on the Flying Vikings website:

Since Flying Vikings also has a contract with local news gathering organizations, students are offered opportunities to build time that no other school can. Fly 3 to 6 hours a day and get paid.

A visual aid to help imagine yourself staring at a motionless propeller low over the Bay Area. Click to expand:

175264529_c84380bc84_o-copy.jpg

The dash of a Cessna 172 and a view of Candlestick Park, from the incredible Telstar Logistics Flickrstream

Here’s a photo of a different Flying Vikings aircraft, a Piper that suffered a fatal accident in 2006. Readers may find this link, relating to the Piper crash, of interest, however, it might lead you to unproven speculation about the cause of that tragedy.

The Federal Aviation Administration and Cal OSHA should be able to determine the cause of this forced landing fairly easily.

A relatively happy ending to a scary situation.

So that’s the purported “false article” from 2008.
 
Actually, the only reason I found this incident noteworthy at the time was the number of conflicting reports about the cause of  this incident. The National Transportation Safety Board investigated and concluded the problem was:
 
“A loss of engine power due to oil starvation. The oil starvation event was due to the failure of maintenance personnel to tighten the mounting bolts for the newly installed vacuum pump.”
 
Seems the pump had just been replaced three days earlier and the flight of June 30, 2008 was the first one using the new pump.
 
All the deets from the NTSB, after the jump.
 
(more…)

KCBS in Denial About Yesterday’s Crash Landing in Oakland, CA?

Tuesday, July 1st, 2008

First,  let’s all agree that denial, (also called abnegation), is:

 “is a defense mechanism‘ postulated by Sigmund Freud, in which a person is faced with a fact that is too uncomfortable to accept…”

Can a radio station be in denial? Well, how about the coverage KCBS AM 740  is giving to yesterday’s crash landing of a traffic-reporting Cessna 172. KCBS reports this incident thusly: “Plane Lands near I-80 Ramp” with an account about how “freeway traffic was not affected by the landing”.

Firstly, KCBS used this in the webpage URL: “Plane-Blocks-I-80-Off-Ramp” – so this was spurious information? Or maybe the plane blocked the off-ramp, but not the freeway? Secondly, other media sources correctly called this incident a “crash-landing,” as that’s what it was. Thirdly, KCBS reported last month’s other crash landing of a Cessna 172 in the bay area as a “crash landing.”

175264529_c84380bc84_o-copy.jpg

The dash of a Cessna 172 that didn’t crash land in the bay area last month, from the incredible Telstar Logistics Flickrstream

There’s lots of ways to report a story. KCBS certainly chose a drama-free approach. As must be obvious by now, you can put a Cessna 172 (that has a landing weight pretty close to a tiny 2-seat Smart Car) down in a very small piece of real estate, but yesterday’s crash landing could easily have been fatal.

So, better check yo self before you wreck yo self (again). Just saying,

Another Accident Involving Hayward-based Flying Vikings, Inc.

Monday, June 30th, 2008

Today’s headlines include news of the crash landing of a Flying Vikings, Inc. Cessna 172 in Oakland, California.

The San Jose Mercury News earlier reported that N61736 “had a gas leak,” but now is going with “mechanical problems” as the cause of this incident. KCBS, which labels this single engine plane the KCBS Radio Traffic Plane, is reporting the pilot claimed the oil pressure guage plummetted just before the engine conked out. This aircraft, built in 1974, suffered “substantial damage” during an incident in 1981.  

The following language, written before today’s accident, appears on the Flying Vikings website:

Since Flying Vikings also has a contract with local news gathering organizations, students are offered opportunities to build time that no other school can. Fly 3 to 6 hours a day and get paid.

A visual aid to help imagine yourself staring at a motionless propeller low over the Bay Area. Click to expand:

175264529_c84380bc84_o-copy.jpg

The dash of a Cessna 172 and a view of Candlestick Park, from the incredible Telstar Logistics Flickrstream

Here’s a photo of a different Flying Vikings aircraft, a Piper that suffered a fatal accident in 2006. Readers may find this link, relating to the Piper crash, of interest, however, it might lead you to unproven speculation about the cause of that tragedy.

The Federal Aviation Administration and Cal OSHA should be able to determine the cause of this forced landing fairly easily.

A relatively happy ending to a scary situation.