Posts Tagged ‘forest’

Does This Look Like Berkeley to You? – The Charming Lake Anza Swimming Hole on a Dreaded Sunny Day

Monday, June 24th, 2013

As seen on Saturday by Amy Chen:

But watch for that e coli

Why I Favor UCSF Over the Mount Sutro “Cloud” “Forest” NIMBYs: #1 – UCSF Does Stuff, the NIMBYs Don’t

Monday, March 4th, 2013

UCSF is finally getting off its ass and doing something about all those eucalyptus trees and this is the response?

I cry foul.

Now, leaving aside the fact that the Mount Sutro “cloud forest” aint a cloud forest and it aint a forest* neither, UCSF does stuff.

What do the whiny millionaire NIMBY neighbors of UCSF do? Nothing.

Advantage: UCSF.

Of course, there are impoverished hippies who similarly oppose UCSF doing anything to manage this area, so I’m going to look into this when I can.

But the assumption is:

WHY SHOULDN’T UCSF BE ABLE TO MANAGE ITS LAND?

See? UCSF does stuff. What do YOU do? 

Click to expand

To Be Continued…

*What is it really? A stand, a grove, a wood? (Which is the most insulting?) Alls I know is that Christopher Robin used to play in the Hundred Acre Wood, not the Hundred Acre Forest, right?

“Tis the Season for Science” at Our California Academy of Sciences – Snow! Reindeer! Spice Forest! Performances!

Tuesday, November 22nd, 2011

Tis the Season for Science at the California Academy of Sciences.

Check it:

“From November 23, 2011 – January 16, 2012 the Academy will offer a suite of wintry festivities and family fun that will celebrate the science behind some of our most familiar holiday sights, sounds, and traditions. Highlights include:

A pair of live reindeer

Indoor snow flurries twice an hour

A Snowman Theater – an immersive digital dome shaped like a giant snowman, which will play two new shows on the science of snow

An aromatic Spice Forest – displays of the raw botanical specimens from which we get cinnamon, nutmeg, vanilla, and other holiday ingredients

Festive programs including quiz shows, live music, dance, and theater performances

Mounted specimens of the birds mentioned in “The Twelve Days of Christmas,” including swans, geese, colly birds, hens, doves, and a partridge in a pear tree.”

Remember RLGC – Reindeer Love Graham Crackers. Hey kids, name this reindeer! (She’s a girl, BTW.)

Click to expand

And here’s what these critters looked like when they were on the famous roof, via an iPhone 4:

This is Miles – he’s a fool for pine branches, I’ll tell you:

Les mise-en-scene:

One of four Evaporative Snow machines:

Le Theatre de Bonhomme de Neige – they’ve got two short films to show once you get inside:

The aromatic Spice Forest lets you smell stuff like nutmeg and vanilla:

And a partridge in a pear tree:

See you there!

It’s Hard to Tell You’re in California’s Fourth-Largest City When at Andy Goldsworthy’s Spire

Wednesday, May 12th, 2010

I guess you can see a famous landmark in the background, but otherwise this scene in the Presidio is fairly bucolic. 

“Spire” by Andy Goldsworthy. Click to expand

Enveloping the Presidio with lush greenery, the historic forest is a beloved park feature. It provides habitat for birds and wildlife and also contributes to the Presidio’s designation as a National Historic Landmark District.

The Presidio forest was planted over a relatively short period of time and is more than 100 years old. While the eucalyptus trees continue to thrive, the pines and cypress are declining. Each year, the Presidio Trust replants two to three acres, staggering the effort to create an uneven-aged forest that can be more easily sustained.

Since 2002, the Trust has planted nearly 2,000 trees and is preserving the qualities that define the forest’s character, such as the orderly military alignment of trees. The Trust’s reforestation strategy also takes into account the forest’s importance as wildlife habitat and considers the needs of visitors who walk in its shade or admire the views it frames.

The grove along the Bay Area Ridge Trail near the Arguello Gate (see photo above) is predominantly cypress trees. The Trust has removed 150 dying trees from this area and will replant 1,200 trees along the Bay Area Ridge Trail over the next 10 years.

In 2006, artist Andy Goldsworthy visited the Presidio and was inspired by the history and character of the forest. He saw an opportunity to create a sculpture with the felled mature trees. Constructed in October 2008, The Spire tells the story of the forest, celebrates its history and natural rhythms, and welcomes the next generation of trees. It is a poetic reference to the forest’s past; as new young trees grow up to meet the sculpture, it will eventually disappear into the forest.

Andy Goldsworthy was born in 1956 and spent his childhood in Yorkshire, England. Goldsworthy’s work has been made in the open air, in places as diverse as the Yorkshire Dales, the North Pole, and the Australian Outback. His works in the Bay Area include Stone River at Stanford University, made from the rubble left after the Loma Prieta earthquake, and Drawn Stone at the De Young Museum in San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park, which also recalls San Francisco’s earthquakes and their effects.

Goldsworthy draws his inspiration from places and creates art from the materials found close at hand, such as twigs, leaves, stones, snow and ice, reeds, and thorns. The works made from these natural materials interact in different ways with their environments. The Presidio’s man-made forest is an evocative backdrop for the artist who strives “to make connections between what we call nature and what we call man-made.”

Spire recalls one of Goldsworthy’s earliest sculptures, Memories, also spires of mature trees, created in 1984 in the Grizedale Forest in the Lake District of North West England. “I have not found another great location for this type of work until now.”

The Spire is located on the Bay Area Ridge Trail near the Arguello Gate, west of Inspiration Point Overlook and north of the Presidio Golf Course Clubhouse (view Spire map).”