Posts Tagged ‘france’

Scoot Quad Microcars on the Streets of San Francisco – Six Dollars for a Half-Hour of Mobility

Monday, November 7th, 2016

First there was the Renault Twizy:

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As seen on Page:

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And now there’s the highly similar Nissan Quad:

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Race them if you want to:

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All the deets:

Scoot Quad
A Scoot Quad is a mini electric car that can carry two people. Say hello to the Quads and get ready to explore the city in a whole new way.

Performance
• Top speed of 25 MPH
• Range of 40 city miles

Sustainability
• $1 of electricity to fill ‘er up from a normal wall outlet
• Gets the equivalent of 250 MPG (after doing the math to convert the electrical energy to dirty gas equivalent)
• Produces 6% of the CO2 per mile of a car (including the emissions from the power plants that make the electricity)

Details
• US drivers license and Scoot membership required
• Carries two people — that’s what the backseat is for!
• No freeways, bridges, or roads with speed limits over 35 MPH

Pricing
• Quads are $6 up to 30 min, 20¢ per minute afterwards.

Big Car, Regular Car, Tiny Car – This is How We Live Now, in 2016

Monday, May 2nd, 2016

Look, it’s Twizy! In red these days:

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FLASHBACK: Recalling When Hipsters of the Lower Haight Tried to Own and Operate an AMC Pacer for a Laugh or Two

Thursday, February 11th, 2016

This was the scene on Haight Street back in the aughts (and back when CWNevius still lived in the East Bay, where he belongs and where he’d be happier) – four urban youts inside of one AMC Pacer:

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This thing was advertised as the “first wide small car,” and maybe it was. (Back in the day, certainly, it was wide enough for the Sandwich King.)

(Perhaps Google should have used these cars to carry their Street View sensors around? Compared to brand-new, bright red hybrid Priuseses, a fleet of old Pacers would have attracted less attention from John Law.)

But look, Gentle Reader, they loved Pacers in France, for some reason:

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All right, let’s say au revoir to les hipsters de Haight, seen after they’d navigated through the already failed Octavia Boulevard “urbanist”/urbonaut experiment/ongoing fiasco:

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(Headrests are for squares of course.)

Stay safe in your overweight, underpowered, low-MPG, two-ton fishbowl!

Frisco Update: What’s “OUR VERSION OF THE LOUVRE” Museum? – It’s Levi’s Stadium, Per the Super Bowl L Host Committee

Tuesday, December 22nd, 2015

[UPDATE: Well I can’t really change the headline now, but perhaps it’s Levi’s Stadium itself running these ads? IDK.]

In the words of Hannibal Lecter, WHAT COULD BE MORE OFFENSIVE?

Via Reader James Corrigan comes this:

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(I thought it was officially Super Bowl L, but I guess we want to Keep Things Simple for fans by calling it SB 50?)

I’ll tell you, I know people who spend three(!) hours a day getting back and forth to northern Santa Clara County and that’s with the benefit of carpool lanes. But if you want to spend your time (what, four hours?) going to and coming back from Much Further South, like all the way down to the city of Santa Clara, well then be my guest. (Bring money.)

What are the headwinds here? Domestic Violence? Concussion Dangers? Losing Record? Personal Seat Licenses Dropping In Value By 80%? Coldplay? (Fucking) Train? Addled Transit In The 415 With Zero Compensation From The NFL / Our Vaunted Host Committee? (Hoist Committee? Heist Committee?)

IDK, man.

LEVI’S STADIUM, I served with THE LOUVRE.* I knew THE LOUVRE.*  THE LOUVRE was a friend of mine.* LEVI’S STADIUM, you’re no THE LOUVRE.

Let’s mark this down as 2015’s Most Offensive Pop-Up Ad of the Year.

*Oh, not actually – I’ve never been to Paris. 

Sighted: A Renault Twizy on Page Street – It’s the Smallest Car You’ll Ever See – It’s Part of the Scoot Network

Wednesday, May 27th, 2015

Here’s the latest:

Renault has initiated an experiment in San Francisco with the scoot-sharing startup @http://www.scootnetworks.com/ to evaluate a potential fit for their fleet”

Le Twizy seen on Page – from Spain with love:

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Yes, there’s room for two:

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I know what you’re thinking – you’re thinking, “Will It Drift?”

Bon courage, Twizy. Bienvenue a San Francisco!

Does San Francisco Really Have a “French Quarter?” Not Really, Despite What Microsoft Says

Friday, March 27th, 2015

Well, here it is, from the Bing Maps:

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(IDK, this is less offensive than “Uptown Tenderloin,” one supposes, you know, coming from San Francisco’s non-profit profiteers.)

French Quarter sounds a bit, grandiose?

Here’s the cure, as usual, from wilds of the Internet:

Ha. No one here knows by that name. There’s not a distinct boundary for the collection of French-serving restaurants and businesses near the French Consulate, the church and school of Notre Dame des Victoires on Bush Street. But apparently it’s been dubbed by some hotel marketing person as the “French Quarter.” Belden Alley and Claude Alley intersect with Bush Street, and each have some French cafes. On Bush/Grant Ave. is the Cafe de la Presse — a coffee house with French and international newspapers, and restaurant. There’s Cafe Claude on Claude and some other bistros. Plouf! is an excellent mussel house on Belden…”

All right, keep on Binging, Microsoft.

News Flash for Willie Brown: SF WAS NOT IS NOT AND WILL NEVER BE the Sister City of Paris – The Real Sister is Rome, Italy

Wednesday, December 3rd, 2014

Here’s Willie Brown (Mayor of San Francisco, 1996 to Present) going on about:

…our sister city Paris…

The problem with that is that Paris only has one (1) sister city and it’s not San Francisco.

It’s Rome.

They even have a saying about this:

Only Paris is worthy of Rome; only Rome is worthy of Paris.

Seule Paris est digne de Rome; seule Rome est digne de Paris

Solo Parigi è degna di Roma; solo Roma è degna di Parigi.

Ergo, San Francisco is not “worthy” of being the Sister City of either Paris or Rome.

Sorry, Mayor Brown.

The fact is that Paris is in an exclusive sister-city relationship. It’s an “elaborate cultural partnership,” as they say.

Now, here’s our real relationship with The City of Light. We’ve signed a few of these things:

“Pacts of friendship and cooperation signed by the City of Paris.”

Les pactes d’amitié et de coopération signés par la Ville de Paris

Which, IRL, is rien de bien grave* (no biggee).

All right, TTFN. But remember:

We’ll Always Never Have Paris.

*Paris, France is pals with just about everybody:

2014: Rome 
2014: Seoul 
2014: Mexico 
2013: Montevideo 
2013: Amsterdam 
2011: Yerevan 
2011: Dakar
2011: Sao Paulo, signed an amendment to the Cooperation Agreement of 2004 
2011: Yerevan 
2011: Rio de Janeiro 
2011: Ramallah, signed a pact of friendship and cooperation inauguration, the Garden of Nations, a bust by French sculptor Emile-Antoine Bourdelle (1861-1929), including Ramallah to Paris 
2010: Doha 
2010: Tel Aviv-Jaffa 
2009: Istanbul 
2009: Quebec 
2009: San Francisco  
2009: Rio de Janeiro 
2009: Quebec 
2009: Jericho 
2009: Istanbul  
2007: Phnom Penh 
2006: Montreal  
2006: Cairo  
2006: Beirut  
2005: Copenhagen  
2004: Tunis  
2004: Sao Paulo 
2004: Rabat  
2004: Casablanca 
2003 St. Petersburg 
2003: Quebec 
2003: Algiers 
2002: Geneva 
2001: Porto Alegre (joint statement) 
2001: London 
2000: Madrid 
2000: Athens 
2000 (updated in 2004): Washington 
1999: Warsaw 
1999: OVA (Arab Towns Organization) 
1999: Mexico 
1999: Buenos Aires 
1999: Amman 
1998: Sydney 
1998: Sofia 
1998: Lisbon 
1998: Yerevan 
1997: Tbilisi 
1997, Santiago  
1997: St. Petersburg 
1997: Riyadh  
1997: Prague 
1997: Beijing 
1996: San Francisco 
1996: Quebec 
1996: Chicago 
1995: Jakarta 
1993: Beirut 
1992: Moscow 
1991: Seoul 
1987: Sanaa  
1987: Berlin 
1987: Amman 
1985: Cairo 
1982: Tokyo 
1958: Kyoto 
1956: Rome (Twin Exclusive)

Aviation Writer James Fallows Commits the MSM Blunder of the Year with “Don’t Blame Malaysia Airlines” in the NYT

Tuesday, July 22nd, 2014

Hoo boy: “Don’t Blame Malaysia Airlines

“Was this disaster somehow the airline’s fault? The answer is no — but to understand why, you have to look at the complex realities of modern commercial aviation.”

My isn’t this a touch patronizing? Well, obviously the primary fault is with the crew and commanders of the Gadfly missile system used to shoot down the plane. But Malaysian Air Systems is partially to blame for its negligent operation.

“Malaysia Airlines, already world famous because of the still-missing flight MH370, appears to have been following all normal safety rules.”

Is anybody suggesting that this flight was somehow illegal? I don’t think so. So talking about Malaysian following the “rules” is pointless.

“…explicit prohibitions are critical, because the entire aviation system works on the premise that unless airspace is marked as off-limits, it is presumptively safe and legal for flight.

OK again, Jimmy, the flight was unsafe but legal. Nobody’s suggesting that the flight was not legal.

“…when they crossed this zone at 33,000 feet, they were neither cutting it razor-close nor bending the rules, but doing what many other airlines had done, in a way they assumed was both legal and safe.”

Again, Jimmy, why are you harping on what’s “legal” to make your point that Malaysian wasn’t negligent? It’s as if the New York Times has turned into the Public Relations arm of Malaysian Air Systems or the government of Malaysia.

All right, it’s time to review. Here’s a partial list of airlines that were specifically avoiding this part of eastern Ukraine before the shootdown:

Asiana Airlines

Korean Air Lines  

China Airlines

Air France

British Airways

Air Berlin [Germany’s second-largest airline]

The operators of these airlines would have been able to fly over eastern Ukraine legally, but they chose not to. Why’s that, Jimmy? Why would these airlines spend more on kerosene for no reason?

Mr. Fallows continues in The Atlantic:

Somehow I suspect that if it had been a Lufthansa plane that was attacked, there would be fewer starting-point assumptions that the carrier had somehow been cutting corners at the cost of its passengers’ safety. 

This sounds like it came straight from Malaysian Airlines, this racism (or whatever) argument he’s pushing. In any event, corner-cutting at the expense of passenger safety is exactly what occurred here.

And here’s the stinger:

“If a government or rogue faction shoots down a commercial plane, is that really an “air safety issue?” 

Well, hell yes it is, Jimmy. It’s exactly an air safety issue. That’s why all those airlines cited above, plus others, were avoiding the area. For safety.

Comes now aviation writer Christine Negroni to offer views contrary to that of flyboy fanboy James Fallows:

So while Malaysia is self-evidently correct it its statements; the airspace was open and hundreds flights between Europe and Asia were using it every day, it is a weak reply to a valid question of responsibility

Indeed.

Why James Fallows wants to shut down the conversation about the question of responsibility is a mystery to me…

Google Seeks the “Right Balance” on the Right To Be Forgotten: “Expert Advisory Council” to Hold Meetings in Europe Soon

Friday, July 11th, 2014

The latest from the Google Blog on the so-called Right To Be Forgotten in the First Amendment-free EU:

Searching for the right balance

[So in five words I’m counting two puns and one subtle jab at the possibility of an absence of balance in this latest unappealable edict handed down from the Court of Justice.]

So here’s the wind-up:

“In May, the Court of Justice of the European Union established a “right to be forgotten.” Today, we published an op-ed by David Drummond, senior vice president of corporate development and chief legal officer, in the U.K.’s The Guardian, Germany’s Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, France’s Le Figaro and Spain’s El Pais, discussing the ruling and our response. We’re republishing the op-ed in full below. -Ed.”

And here’s the pitch – the final two grafs:

“That’s why we’ve also set up an advisory council of experts, the final membership of which we’re announcing today. These external experts from the worlds of academia, the media, data protection, civil society and the tech sector are serving as independent advisors to Google. The council will be asking for evidence and recommendations from different groups, and will hold public meetings this autumn across Europe to examine these issues more deeply. Its public report will include recommendations for particularly difficult removal requests (like criminal convictions); thoughts on the implications of the court’s decision for European Internet users, news publishers, search engines and others; and procedural steps that could improve accountability and transparency for websites and citizens.”

“The issues here at stake are important and difficult, but we’re committed to complying with the court’s decision. Indeed it’s hard not to empathize with some of the requests we’ve seen—from the man who asked that we not show a news article saying he had been questioned in connection with a crime (he’s able to demonstrate that he was never charged) to the mother who requested that we remove news articles for her daughter’s name as she had been the victim of abuse. It’s a complex issue, with no easy answers. So a robust debate is both welcome and necessary, as, on this issue at least, no search engine has an instant or perfect answer.”

“Posted by David Drummond, Senior Vice President, Corporate Development and Chief Legal Officer

Well played, G!

Straight Outta Aubergenville: Renault 10, Stanyan

Thursday, July 3rd, 2014

Look, it’s the French Chevy Corvair, still on the road.

Arresting:

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