Posts Tagged ‘gallons’

The Most Falsest Press Release I’ve Seen So Far in 2013: “Alcohol Justice” Non-Profit on the Super Bowl

Friday, February 1st, 2013

“Super Sunday is the nation’s worst day of the year for domestic violence…”

FALSE.

“…and drunk driving,”

FALSE

“America consumes an estimated 325 million gallons of beer on the day of the big game…”

FALSE. I mean, think about it. Most Americans don’t even watch the game, right? So, of the American’s drinking beer on Super Sunday, they’d each have to down like 20 cans? How is this even possible? And when’s the last time you drank a gallon of anything in an afternoon? Think McFly, think!

I don’t know, in some countries, when you lie you get locked up. What should be the punishment for people who make up stuff and then use a taxpayer-subsidized organization to propagate made up stuff?

Mmmmm…

To wit:

“Alcohol Justice CEO on How To Prevent Violence After the Har-Bowl

If You Don’t Drink Responsibly Watching Football, Stay Home or Go Home

SAN FRANCISCO, Jan. 31, 2013 — San Francisco resident Bruce Lee Livingston, Executive Director and CEO of Alcohol Justice, is available to comment on the toxic mix of alcohol, sports, and street violence.

“Super Sunday is the nation’s worst day of the year for domestic violence and drunk driving,” says Bruce Lee Livingston, Executive Director / CEO of Alcohol Justice. “But whether the Ravens or the Niners win the Har-Bowl it could be a civic nightmare on city streets.”

Driven by Big Alcohol advertising, branding, sponsorship and celebrity endorsements,America consumes an estimated 325 million gallons of beer on the day of the big game, so alcohol-related harm is inevitable.  Budweiser sponsorship of the NFL Championship and beer sales are the biggest threat to public safety on that day.

“It’s not enough to discourage hard liquor and promote responsible beverage service,” adds Livingston. “The bars need to curb beer sales after the game and police need to smartly control traffic and crowds. Mayor Ed Lee and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake should encourage anyone who has had more than three beers to stay home, or go home and wait for parade day.”

Mr. Livingston has spoken recently on fan violence on ESPN’s Outside the Lines and on KCBS Radio. Alcohol Justice encourages the effective evidenced-based prevention techniques of limiting advertising, responsible sales, and community education, but public safety measures could also include traffic flow controls and curfews.

Especially tragic is how many young people are impacted. To counter the half a billion dollars a year that Anheuser-Busch and MillerCoors spend on sports advertising viewed by young people, Alcohol Justice has launched the Free Our Sports(TM) Youth Film Festival.

Media Availability:      For interviews please contact Michael Scippa 415-548-0492, or Bruce Lee Livingston at 415-515-1856, or Jorge Castillo (en Espanol) at 213-840-3336.

More info at:FreeOurSports.org

SOURCE  Alcohol Justice

Crazy State Worker Lady Wants Honda Civic Hybrid Owners to Sue Honda in Small Claims Court Over Low MPG

Wednesday, December 28th, 2011

I’ll tell you, I don’t know how good your odds would be if you sued the maker of your car because you felt it didn’t meet the EPA mileage estimate, but this lady in SoCal appears to have a good shot.

I’ll tell you, Honda Civic Hybrid owners, The System wants you to take some worthless $100 coupon or whatever to compensate you for Honda messing up. The System doesn’t want you opting out of the national class action settlement.

Click to expand

Choose or lose, Honda owners.

HONDA ORDERED TO STAND TRIAL ON JANUARY 3rd

Normally a small claims case is just that – small – in fact, barely an annoyance to large corporations because damages are limited. However, one small claims case pending in the Los Angeles area is certain to get a lot of attention because it will be going to trial just when approximately 200,000 Honda Civic Hybrid owners are opening their mailboxes to find notices of a proposed class action settlement where the Honda owners would get no more than $200 cash and the lawyers would get $8.474 million!

One disappointed Honda Civic Hybrid owner in California who got wind of the tiny settlement offer in advance chose to opt-out of the class and paid $75 to file a small claims case instead. The trial was set for January 3rd, six weeks before the 200,000 Civic owners are set to decide if they want to stick with the class action or file their own suits which can often be done quickly and cheaply without lawyers. (Think Judge Judy where regular people get up and give a 15 minute version of their complaint in plain English and then get a decision from the court). This case will be one of the first under the new 2012 law allowing individuals to sue for up to $10,000 in small claims court in California.

Honda has attempted four different legal maneuvers to postpone the trial until after the deadline had passed for Hybrid owners to opt-out of the class action, but the Judge said “no” all four times and the trial will proceed as originally scheduled on January 3rd. If the Plaintiff in that case wins and gets awarded thousands of dollars in damages, then Honda will have a lot of explaining to do to justify paying other Hybrid owners just enough to cover a few tanks of gas instead of replacing the defective hybrid batteries at $3,000 a pop – roughly $600,000,000.00!”

South San Francisco’s Solazyme, Inc. Has Just Delivered Algae-Based Jet Fuel to the U.S. Navy

Monday, July 19th, 2010

South San Francisco’s Solazyme has made good on its promise to deliver 1500 gallons of algae-based jet fuel to the U.S. Navy.

Will military jets like this F-18 Super Hornet soon be flying on algal fuel?

Looks that way, one of these days. And actually, aviation biofuels soon could be coming to an aircraft near you.

All the deets:

Solazyme Delivers 100% Algal-Derived Renewable Jet Fuel to U.S. Navy

Biotechnology Company Showcases Solajet(TM) HRJ-5 Jet Fuel at the World-famous Farnborough International Air Show in UK

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, Calif., July 18  — Solazyme, Inc. is helping the U.S. military move  closer to powering its planes, ships, tanks and trucks on renewable fuel and has delivered of 1,500 gallons of 100% algae-based jet fuel for the U.S. Navy’s testing and certification program. The U.S. Navy has previously announced the objective to operate at least 50% of its fleet on clean, renewable fuel by 2020, and the delivery fulfills a contract awarded to Solazyme by the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) in September 2009.

Solazyme, a renewable oil and green bioproducts company and leader in algal biotechnology, manufactured the world’s first 100% algal-based jet fuel through its proprietary fermentation process in collaboration with renewable jet fuel processing technology from Honeywell’s UOP.  Solazyme’s renewable Solajet(TM)HRJ-5 is designed to meet all of the requirements for Naval renewable aviation fuel. In preliminary tests, it also meets the fuel requirements of the U.S. Air Force and meets the standards for commercial jet fuel.

“It has been an honor to work with both the Navy and DESC/DLA to provide the first microbial derived advanced biojet fuel that will aid the military’s transition away from fossil fuel and toward more secure, renewable and reliable sources,” said Jonathan Wolfson, CEO, Solazyme. “The military has recognized the national security imperative of creating alternative energy solutions, and this project reflects their leadership and vision in supporting new ways to power our Department of Defense.”

Solazyme’s algal fuel technology will help the DoD reduce its carbon footprint, minimize reliance on foreign oil, combat global climate change and pioneer the development of clean and renewable energy sources for national energy security.

Verified through external lifecycle analyses, Solazyme’s fuels provide an 85% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions compared to traditional fossil fuels.  Prior to delivery to the Navy, the fuel was tested by an independent testing laboratory, and met all of the Navy’s 19 rigorous requirements for renewable hydrotreated jet fuel.  In addition, the fuel meets the proposed ASTM D 7566 specification for Aviation Turbine Fuels containing synthesized hydrocarbons, which is a critical milestone for providing fuels not only for the military, but also for the civilian market.

About Solazyme:

Solazyme, Inc. is a renewable oil and bioproducts company and the leader in algal biotechnology. Founded in 2003 and headquartered in South San Francisco, Solazyme’s unique technology enables the production of oil and biomaterials in standard fermentation facilities quickly, efficiently and at large scale. These oils and biomaterials are tailored to be drop-in replacements for fossil fuel and plant oils, which are feedstocks for a diverse range of products ranging from fuels and chemicals to personal care products.  Solazyme’s products offer compelling solutions to the increasingly complex challenges of fuel scarcity, energy security and environmental impact. These products fit seamlessly into the pre-existing multi-trillion dollar fuel infrastructure. Solazyme’s investors among others include Braemar Energy Ventures, Harris & Harris Group, Lightspeed VenturePartners, The Roda Group, and VantagePoint Venture Partners. For more information, please visit our website: http://www.solazyme.com/.

Is It Really True That Cars in the 1950s Only Went 100 Miles Between Fill Ups?

Monday, February 9th, 2009

No, no it’s not. But who’s saying that in today’s New York Times? Disingenuous Shai Agassi of Project Better Place, that’s who. To wit:

Cars in the 1950s only went about 100 miles on a tank of gas, and that problem was solved by installing an infrastructure of gas stations.”

See, he’s trying to get support for his scheme of battery exchange stations for electric cars, so he’s cogitating about History and stuff. Which is fine, but why does he have to be all Music Man all the time?  

A Nash from the 1940′s. Did some Nashes have a range of 600 miles on a tank of gas? Yes.

 

Other cars, like VW Beetles, could also go much farther than 100 miles on a tank. But what about your stereotypical slick black Cadillacs with sold gold hub caps? Could these huge vehicles with 20 gallon tanks get more than 5 mpg on the open road? Yes.

Well maybe Shai was talking about cars in Israel or Europe in the 1950′s? Even so, same deal. Does this make Shai Agassi a liar? A promoter? A Believer?

If it doesn’t matter what MPG cars got in the 1950s, then why talk about it in your pitch? If you’re mistaken about this, what else are you mistaken about?