Posts Tagged ‘golden gate restaurant association’

Sign of the Times: Recession-Era “Dine About Town” Renamed as “SF RESTAURANT WEEK” – Max Price is $85, a 130% Increase

Monday, January 12th, 2015

Hey, you want a government program that actually works? How about requiring all restaurants to post their hygiene letter grades on a big poster at the main entrance, the way they do down in SoCal?

Take a look:

“In 1998, the County of Los Angeles set out to create a report card grading the hygiene of all restaurants. Phillip Leslie, associate professor of strategic management at Stanford GSB, saw the new law as an opportunity to study the effects of information on consumers and on market outcome. “We wanted to look at how responsive consumers were to that information and whether that translated to responsiveness by restaurants to improve product quality,” says Leslie.

“What he found was overwhelming evidence that not only did consumers change their behavior once the ratings became public by frequenting restaurants with better scores, but restaurants also improved their hygiene levels. And he saw an additional benefit: fewer hospitalizations due to food-related illnesses. “We found that better information causes a change in the behavior of restaurants and consumers, and resulted in an improvement in public health,” says Leslie.

Now that you’re up to speed, here’s the kicker:

He also found the new system had an apparent impact on restaurant-goers’ health. Leslie studied data from the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development detailing the number of people admitted to hospitals with specific illnesses. What he found was that hospital admissions for food-related illnesses fell 13 percent from the previous year for people living in Los Angeles, while they rose 3.2 percent in the rest of state. Overall, there were 20 percent fewer food-related hospitalizations in LA than the area would have been expected to experience if the grades had not been introduced.

Now, do you think that San Francisco Mayor Willie Brown and/or any of his appointed minions, like Gavin Newsom or Ed Lee, think that this kind of letter grade requirement would be good for San Francisco? IDK. But so far nobody has dared to defy the Golden Gate Restaurant Association, which super doesn’t want letter grades posted for tout le monde to see, even though such a requirement would boost sales overall, and have an even greater benefit for those who don’t skirt the rules set out by SFGov.

Oh well.

But I digress.

Hey, here are the new deets for SAN FRANCISCO RESTAURANT WEEK. (Or take a look at this  well-reported Annie Sciacca bit from last month, if you want the complete history.)

Observations:

The GGRA has taken over “Dine About Town” from the local tourist organization and this is going to CHANGE EVERYTHING? OK, maybe, we’ll see.

The top price for this program has gone up 130%? Yep. Boy, that sure is restaurateur-friendly, huh?

And the $xx.99 pricing scheme now goes to $xx.00? My, how posh we are.

And what’s this? “San Francisco has the best restaurant community anywhere. Full stop.” Really? Not New York? Not Paris? Not Rome? Not Tokyo? My, how provincial we are.

OTOH, “Restaurant Week” sounds like we’re simply copying other towns in order to sound more “world class.” And of course, it won’t be an actual week, so we’ll be 43% more world-class than everybody else!

And we need $85 deals to allow restaurateurs to “highlight farmer relationships [and] winemaker partnerships…” Like they don’t do that enough on their own already?

And what’s this, a “family-style whiskey-themed dinner?” We’ll be just like Italy!

ASSIGNMENT DESK: Why did the GGRA take control of DAT from SFT? What was wrong with the program before? (IDK myself. This one would write itself, huh?)

I propose a RESTAURANT YEAR, a year in which restaurateurs learn to accept the realities behind that Stanford study and relent on the letter grade issue. Oh what’s that, Yelp has the numerical scores hidden away so that they’re hard to see? No, what we need are simple old-school letter grades posted for all to see.

All right, here it is. Enjoy:

“SAN FRANCISCO RESTAURANT WEEK

January 21 @ 10:00 am – January 30 @ 10:00 pm
SAN FRANCISCO RESTAURANT WEEK IS BACK AND BETTER THAN EVER!

(Under new leadership and with new program updates.)

San Francisco has the best restaurant community anywhere. Full stop. Imagine 10 days of celebrating that. This is the first year that the Golden Gate Restaurant Association has taken the reigns of SF Restaurant Week (a program formerly known as Dine About Town – presented by San Francisco Travel). Based on diner feedback, we gave the program a few updates and are excited to share the addition of a new charity partner: the SF-Marin Food Bank. We’re thrilled to re-introduce you to the new SF Restaurant Week and get your support building this into the ultimate celebration of our diverse restaurant landscape.

During Restaurant Week diners can choose from:

$25 – 2 Course Lunch Menu

$40 – 3 Course Dinner Menu

AND NEW THIS YEAR:

$85 Discovery (tasting) Menu – This is a new menu offering available at select restaurants designed to inspire restaurants’ creativity and delight diners. Look for menus that highlight farmer relationships, winemaker partnerships, special dishes or cocktails, or a chef’s vivid imagination.

Sneak Peek: Great Discovery Menu plans are in the works. Hog & Rocks will be doing a family style whiskey themed dinner in partnership with High West Whiskey. ThirstyBear Brewing Co. is planning a beer themed dinner with food made with beer. We’ll reveal Ichi Sushi + Ni Bar, RN74, AQ and a number of others’ Discovery Menus soon! Stay tuned…

When is San Francisco Restaurant Week?

San Francisco Restaurant Week is a 10 day celebration from January 21 – 30, 2015. Why do we call it Restaurant Week? Because ‘Restaurant 10 Days’ just didn’t sound as good.

How do I find out which restaurants are participating?

We are curating a fabulous group of restaurants that reflect our unique and diverse culinary community. You will be able to see the list of participating restaurants and the menus they will be offering here on this website on January 5th, 2015. In the meantime, visit our Facebook page (join the event!) and see a sneak peek of who is participating and some of the dishes and experiences that will be on offer.

Should I make a reservation?

Yes! Not only to make sure you get to try all of the fabulous menus at the places you want to visit but also because $0.25 of every cover sold through OpenTable bookings will benefit the SF-Marin Food Bank. Your planning ahead is good for you, good for restaurants, and good for the Food Bank. We’re all for that, and think you should be too.

What’s in it for me?

A city-wide celebration with special menus isn’t enough? Ok, we’ll throw in a few extra goodies. We’ll be rewarding the most enthusiastic diners (those that eat at at least 4 or more participating restaurants during Restaurant Week) with 12 – $100 gift certificates. We’ll be collecting photo entries on our Facebook page. More details on that soon…

Bold Move: SF Business Times Prints Shame List of “Restaurants with High-Risk Health Code Violations”

Tuesday, December 23rd, 2014

Seems a long time ago now, but back eight years the spouse of a County Supervisor had this to say:

“To those mother fuckers at the Golden Gate Restaurant Association: FUCK YOU!”

And I thought, what an odd thing to say, but yeah, I can see where that comes from.

(Here’s just one example – this place is a member. Like, it even gets promoted by the GGRA.)

Anyway, the GGRA spends its time doing things like lobbying against simple letter grades for restaurants, ala San Diego. Which is funny, because posting simple letter grades up front has lots of benefits – like it lowers food poisoning incidents at ER’s in the surrounding area and other good stuff like that. Check it:

“A 2003 study by two economists [Yay, Stanfoo!] found that after letter grades were introduced in Los Angeles, there was a 20 percent decline in hospital admissions for food-borne illness.

But the SF Bidness Times, well, the people there must bump into officers of the GGRA all the time. And yet here it is, the SFBT now has a naughty list a mile long.

Here’s part of it – let’s start with the beginning of the alphabet

Arizmendi Bakery
1331 9th Ave.
08/28/2014: Unclean hands or improper use of gloves (Score: 73)

Ouch. If I were Arizmendi, I’d spend more time striving to get a triple digit score and less time working on buying a “parklet” from the City.

And hey, who’s in charge of AT&T these days? Is it Olympian Larry Baer? I think so:

AT&T – Cable Car Bar (Promenade) [146520]
24 Willie Mays Plaza
09/14/14: No hot water or running water (Score: 93)

AT&T – Say Hey Sausage-Room 5319 [145157]
24 Willie Mays Plaza 5.15.01
09/14/14: High-risk food holding temperature (Score: 93)

AT&T Park – Food Cart
24 Willie Mays Plaza
09/14/14: Sewage or wastewater contamination (Score: 93)

AT&T Park – Garden Table Stand
24 Willie Mays Plaza
09/14/14: High-risk food holding temperature (Score: 93)

AT&T PARK – Gotham Kitchen
24 Wilie Mays Plaza
09/14/14: Unclean or unsanitary food contact surfaces (Score: 91)

AT&T PARK – Hearth Table Stand
24 Willie Mays Plaza
09/14/14: High-risk food holding temperature (Score: 93)

And yet, all the scores appear to be similar? I’m sure there’s a reason for that, but I don’t know the reason. (Are some of these violations no biggee? I don’t know. Which violations are important and which are less so? IDK.)

There’s lots I don’t understand about how SFGov does it restaurant health grading. Oh well.

Hey SFGov, can we get simple, effective letter grades posted out front, ala San Diego? Oh no, you just don’t feel like it? Oh what’s that, the GGRA doesn’t want you do it so you won’t?

OK fine.

And the Award For San Francisco’s #1 Tourist Trap Restaurant Goes To … Castagnola’s Seafood and Chophouse

Thursday, April 17th, 2014

Here we go, start reading – this place is horrible.

IMO, San Francisco would be better off without this particular place up in Fisherman’s Wharf, but the Golden Gate Restaurant Association disagrees, oh well.

Of course nobody cares what I think so head on up there and check it out, if you want.

And be sure to try the “unnecessarily complicated Shrimp Louie

If you want…

The Line at the “Curry Up Now” Food Truck on Bush is Now Even More Insane – Curling Onto Sansome At Times

Friday, August 2nd, 2013

This food truck line has it all:

1. Length 

2. Girth

3. Staying Power

Here it is – all these people (except for that one dude) are queueing up for Indian food at the truck parked far off in the distance:

Click to expand

So what’s stopping you from competing with this food truck?

Regulation. Recently-passed neo-corporatist regulation sponsored by Golden Gate Restaurant Association-loving Supervisor Scott Wiener that is.

Oh well.

Consider this CUN truck a pioneer, a ’49er or possibly even ’48er, in the Great Food Truck Gold Rush

So, Mayor Ed Lee Wants Restaurant Health Scores on Yelp But Not Posted On-Site the Way LA and NYC Do It?

Thursday, January 17th, 2013

Does area Republican and Mayor Ed Lee backer Ron Conway own a piece of Yelp? ‘Cause that’s all that I can think of after seeing this doozie of a press release, below.

So let’s stop the party for a second here, Yelpers:

First, tell me this, tell me why San Francisco doesn’t require restaurants to post their latest Health Department scores “prominently” for tout le monde to see.  You know, the way the do it in New York City and Los Angeles:

Instead, you want people to log on to Yelp and read the Yelp ads?

Is that “leadership?”

No it’s not, Interim Mayor Ed Lee.

Hey, wasn’t it your political faction what put the kibosh on the effort to require the posting of grades where they belong?

Yes it was.

Wasn’t that kind of an “Open Data movement” kind of a thing back then?

Yes it was.

Hey, Ed Lee! Why not require San Francisco restaurants to post their scores where people can see them?

That’s what most diners want, right?

Check it, right from the Frisco Zagat:

“An overwhelming 83% of San Francisco surveyors say they agree that restaurants should be required to conspicuously post a letter grade reflecting the results of their health department inspection (as recently passed in NYC, taking a cue from LA).”

All right, here it is, the press release from Fantasyland.

(NB: “Haters” aren’t born, they’re made.)

“WASHINGTON, Jan. 17, 2013 — Today Mayor Edwin M. Lee, Chairman of the US Conference of Mayors Technology and Innovation Task Force, and Yelp CEO and Co-founder Jeremy Stoppelman announced the initial integration of city-provided restaurant health score information on the site that connects people with great local businesses. San Francisco will lead the charge on this innovative effort to make valuable government data more easily accessible to the public; New York City restaurant grades will also be added as business attributes in the weeks ahead.

(Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20050511/SFW134LOGO)

Working with the technology departments of San Francisco and New York, Yelp’s engineering team designed the Local Inspector Value-entry Specification (LIVES) which enables local municipalities to accurately upload restaurant health inspection scores to Yelp’s database. Consumers in SF and NYC will be the first to benefit from this partnership upon the full rollout in the weeks ahead. Philadelphia is also expected to participate along with other municipalities that adopt the new specification.

“This new partnership with Yelp to offer restaurant health inspection scores on its site is another significant step in the Open Data movement,” said Mayor Lee. “By making often hard-to-find government information more widely available to innovative companies like Yelp, we can make government more transparent and improve public health outcomes for our residents through the power of technology.”

“Increasing the transparency and accessibility of important public information is another example of how San Francisco, New York and other municipalities are leading the charge in bettering citizens lives by fostering innovation,” said Jeremy Stoppelman, CEO and Co-founder of Yelp. “It’s exciting to be a part of an important initiative to disseminate valuable health department information to the 84 million unique visitors that turn to Yelp each month on average.”

According to a study in the Journal of Environmental Health(1) (March 2005), Los Angeles County’s decision to require restaurants to display hygiene grade cards on their entrances led to a 13 percent decrease in hospitalizations due to food borne illness. The study also demonstrated that the mandatory public display of these health grades improved the overall average score of restaurants in Los Angeles by incentivizing improved best practices across the local industry. As a leading website and app for dining decisions, Yelp’s open data initiative LIVES stands to empower consumers and improve the quality of life within the cities that participate in the program.

Details about and screenshots of the LIVES implementation can be found at yelp.com/healthscores.

About Yelp

Yelp (NYSE: YELP) connects people with great local businesses. Yelp was founded in San Francisco in July 2004. Since then, Yelp communities have taken root in major metros across the US, Canada, UK, Ireland, France, Germany, Austria, The Netherlands, Spain, Italy, Switzerland, Belgium, Australia, Sweden, Denmark, Norway, Finland, Singapore and Poland. Yelp had a monthly average of 84 million unique visitors in Q3 2012(2). By the end of Q3 2012, Yelpers had written more than 33 million rich, local reviews, making Yelp the leading local guide for real word-of-mouth on everything from boutiques and mechanics to restaurants and dentists. Yelp’s mobile application was used on 8.2 million unique mobile devices on a monthly average basis during Q3 2012.

(1) Source: Journal of Environmental Health,http://kuafu.umd.edu/~ginger/research/JEH-final.pdf

(2) Source: Google Analytics

Examples of LIVES implementation:
http://www.yelp.com/biz/cocobang-san-francisco
http://www.yelp.com/biz/delessio-market-and-bakery-san-francisco-2
http://www.yelp.com/biz/eats-san-francisco

Media contacts:

Christine Falvey
Mayor’s Office of Communications
christine.falvey@sfgov.org
415-554-6131

Stephanie Ichinose
Yelp, Inc
stephanie@yelp.com
415-908-3679

SOURCE  Yelp

Photo:http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20050511/SFW134LOGO
http://photoarchive.ap.org/
Yelp

Here’s the Way Tax Authorities Discover that You’re Undereporting Cash Income at Your Restaurant or Bar – It’s Easy!

Friday, March 30th, 2012

I suppose that somewhere in the universe there are Japanese and Japanese-American restaurant owners operating Chinese food places, but that’s certainly not the case in San Francisco’s Richmond District, which has a mess of Chinese  and Chinese American operators of Japanese restaurants.

As here, at Fune Ya, which used to operate on Clement Street. Read about its tax problems via Will “Big Daddy” Kane right here.

Photo via the Richmond District Blog

How do the state and federal authorities know that you taking the cash that customers give you and simply putting it your pocket? They don’t need to visit your place, they just look at monthly reports and compare them with neighboring businesses. So if you pocket half the cash customers give you that means that your “credit card percentage,” the percentage of sales you make from credit cards, goes up, a lot. And I guarantee you that your CCP will be higher than similar businesses in your area. That’ll make you stand out.

Like these people from this other place down in San Mateo County:

“Taxpayer operates a restaurant. For audit, taxpayer provided bank statements and credit card  merchant statements for the audit period, and guest checks and cash register tapes for December 2007. The Sales and Use Tax Department (Department) found that bank deposits exceeded reported total sales, and, for several months, there were no deposits of cash, which were indications that reported taxable sales were understated.”

In that case, the CCP was an impossible 100%. And also, the owners apparently deposited their cash anyway, which also looks funny.

Anyway, if you skim a little bit occasionally, you’ll get away with it. But you won’t save all that much money and you’ll have to keep up with it on a daily basis. And you’ll have to prevent your lousy employees from finding out and reporting you or finding out and skimming from you yourself. It gets complicated.

Now, if you’re used to flagrantly violating any laws you please, then you’re not going to like dealing with one  THOMAS E. FRANKOVICH (State Bar No. 074414). Why? Because he’ll send somebody in a wheelchair into your restaurant and then it’s game over, man. Game over:

“Plaintiff CRAIG YATES is a person with physical disabilities who, on or about March 10, 2008, March 14, 2008, March 16, 2008, August 15, 2008, August 23, 2008, December 20, 2008, March 7, 2009 and March 26, 2009, was an invitee, guest, patron, customer at defendants’ FUNE YA JAPANESE RESTAURANT, in the City of San Francisco, California. At said time and place, defendants failed to provide proper legal access to the sushi bar, which is a “public accommodation” and/or a “public facility” including, but not limited to entrance, dining area, men’s restroom and women’s restroom.”

So, all the money you “saved” through skimming gets paid out to lawyer Tom Frankovich.

And then you shut the place down.

Oh well.

Oh Snap! MSM Media Smackdown of the Year: SFoodie’s Jonathan Kauffman vs. SF Chronicle Staff Writer Stacy Finz

Monday, November 28th, 2011

I don’t know, I think this is going to be it, here’s the best media smackdown for 2011.

So there I was on the Twitter and I saw this from John Birdsall:

“RT @jonkauffman: The Chron and the GGRA seem to be going after food trucks. What’s wrong with this story? http://t.co/WhjP1GLX

Intriguing, non? So I click on over to read “The Chronicle and the GGRA Go After Food Trucks

So then I’m all like yes, yes, yes, that’s exactly right, Jonathan Kauffman!

Go ahead, check it out, the “flawed” piece in the Chron: “Restaurants want to put brakes on food trucks.”

OK then.

To Tempest Bar’s Tony Cooney:

Uh, gee, maybe your place isn’t so hot for lunch. Why not work on that instead of crying like a baby? Perhaps you should shut down or move? 

To “San Francisco merchants, property managers and restaurant owners”:

This is America, Land of the Free, right? (Cough, you’re just a bunch of rent seekers, cough)

To “opponents [who] complain that the law doesn’t limit the number of food trucks that can operate in a specific location”:

Tough cookies!

To Rob Black, “a lawyer and executive director of Golden Gate Restaurant Association”:

Lo-ser! (You gotta say that one the right way, as if harrasing Darryl Strawberry from the bleachers. I mean, c’mon, do you think that a nerdy, downtown-backed lawyer out of U.C. Hastings College of Law would ever have a prayer of becoming Supervisor of District Six?)

To “those motherfuckers at the Golden Gate Restaurant Association“:

FUCK YOU. Oh, wait a second, that’s not my line, that’s a direct quote from Chris Daly’s wife back in 2006. And at the time I thought, “Gee, what an odd thing to say.” But I’m starting to understand what she was talking about.

For example, Chris Daly wanted letter grades from the health department posted outside of San Francisco restaurants but the GGRA put the kibosh on that. Mmmm. Now, let’s take the time to explore this.

Check it:

“An overwhelming 83% of San Francisco surveyors say they agree that restaurants should be required to conspicuously post a letter grade reflecting the results of their health department inspection (as recently passed in NYC, taking a cue from LA).”

Consumers want this, but the GGRA doesn’t so guess what, we don’t have it. You know what GGRA? The bottom 20% of your members shouldn’t even be in business, so why do you spend so much time defending them?  

Hey, let’s see what Stanford Economist Phil Leslie has to say about letter grading:

“Sales at restaurants receiving an A grade rose 5.7 percent, or about $15,000 a year. B-level restaurant sales increased 0.7 percent, and sales at C-level establishments decreased 1 percent.”

So you don’t want that* for your members, huh, GGRA? 

I don’t know why restaurant owners in San Francisco expect so much. I don’t know why they don’t expect to ever have any competition.

Remember this earlier in the year, when a struggling restaurateur went apeshit and starting parking her SUV specifically to block a food truck?

I’ll put a credit in if you want, but I don’t think you do. She’s still out there. 

Oh, different day, different street, different truck, different obstructionist but the same purpose of parking vehicles in spaces to kick food trucks out of San Francisco.

I’ll put a credit in if you want, but I don’t think you do. That owner is still out there. 

Struggling restaurateurs go after food trucks for the same reason they go after Yelp, IMO.

Speaking of which, maybe this is the kind of thing what fuels the wrath of legacy restaurant owners?

This review is completely devoid of the passion associated with the Japanese Curry truck fiasco.

Foodwise: Salads = 3 stars, (Mixt Greens / Working Girls/ Sellers Mkt and even Portico or Lee’s are better though). Sandwiches = 1 star (this has become an office joke.  $8+ for two pieces of meat, 1 teaspoon of sourkraut, and 1 piece of cheese.  Not prepared to order, sitting in a cooler behind the counter!

Service: meh.

AtmosphereAwkward flow from left to right , pleasant enough tables outside

Price: Crap.  My salad was smaller than any of the choices above but cost more.  And I went simple.”

Could be.

In closing, let’s all give thanks to SFoodie Jonathan Kauffman.

Congratulations, JK, on winning MSM Media Smackdown of the Year, 2011.

*”This study examines the effect of an increase in product quality information to consumers on firms’choices of product quality. In 1998, Los Angeles County introduced hygiene quality grade cards to bedisplayed in restaurant windows. We show that the grade cards cause (i) restaurant health inspection scores to increase, (ii) consumer demand to become sensitive to changes in restaurants’ hygiene quality,and (iii) the number of foodborne illness hospitalizations to decrease. We also provide evidence thatthis improvement in health outcomes is not fully explained by consumers substituting from poor hygiene restaurants to good hygiene restaurants. These results imply the grade cards cause restaurants to make hygiene quality improvements”

Dennis Herrera Throws Down: San Francisco City Attorney Goes After Chinatown’s Dick Lee Pastry for Wage and Hour Violations

Tuesday, July 12th, 2011

Two-star(!) rated Dick Lee Pastry at 716 Jackson in Chinatown is getting spanked by City Attorney Dennis Herrera over wage theft issues today.

But first a word from our health department, which, you know, has employees who would like the City to require letter grades to be posted outside of every joint in town. You know, the way that San Diego, that Progressive bastion, does it. But our Golden Gate Restaurant Association said no so that’s that, no Department of Health letter grades posted at restaurants in the 415.

Check it:

Violation descriptions:

  • 009 Rodents – Immediate Risk Each food facility shall be kept free of vermin: rodents, (rats, mice), cockroaches, flies.(114040)
  • 014 No Water – An adequate, protected, pressurized, potable supply of hot water (120F) and cold water shall be provided at all times. (114095)
  • 019 Shell Eggs – Maintain raw shall eggs at or below 45F (113995, 113997)
  • 024 Ready-To-Eat-Food – Exposed to Possible Contamination from Raw Meats/Poultry/Fish/Eggs All food shall be manufactured, produced, prepared, packed, served so as to be pure, free from contamination, adulteration and spoilage. All food must be stored in an approved facility. Food shall be covered and stored as to be protected and kept free from contamination. Food shall be stored in approved containers and labeled as to contents. Food shall be stored at least 6” off the floor on approved shelving. (113980, 114010, 114020, 114080)
  • 031 Improperly Cleaned/Not Maintained Clean -All utensils and equipment shall be clean, fully operative and in good repair. (114050, 114090)
  • 033 Backflow/Back Siphonage -The potable water supply shall be protected with a backflow or back-siphonage protection device, as required by applicable plumbing codes. (114095)
  • 045 Shellfish Tags/Records – Facility shall maintain tags/records from shellfish for a at least 90 days. (114003, Title 17, CCR)

I’ll tell you, small business owners who ignore one set of rules, tend to ignore other sets of rules, that’s been my experience.

Anyway, here’s the news, it goes on and on:

Wage theft lawsuit seeks to recover $440K in back pay, interest for cheated workers

Dick Lee Pastry paid well below minimum wage, demanded long hours with no overtime, falsified payroll records, retaliated against workers

SAN FRANCISCO (July 12, 2011) — City Attorney Dennis Herrera today sued Dick Lee Pastry, Inc. and its owners and operators for violating state and local laws intended to ensure minimum wages, overtime compensation, and lawful competition by failing to pay more than $440,000 in wages plus interest to seven of their employees. The litigation comes as the result of an investigation by San Francisco’s Office of Labor Standards Enforcement under the direction of Division Manager Donna Levitt. Also named as defendants in the lawsuit are Peter Yu and Ada M. Chiu, who own the restaurant at 716 Jackson Street.

Herrera’s lawsuit, which was filed in San Francisco Superior Court today, seeks to recover compensation for the cheated workers that would include all unlawfully withheld wages, plus ten-percent interest, plus penalties of $50 per day for the duration of their employer’s wage violations. Herrera is additionally seeking penalties of $50 per day per employee as compensation to OLSE under San Francisco’s Minimum Wage Ordinance; potentially severe civil penalties under California’s Unfair Competition Law; and attorneys’ fees and costs associated with the action.

“Robbing employees of wages to which they’re entitled doesn’t just hurt working families — it also hurts honest businesses and their employees by corrupting a competitive marketplace,” said Dennis Herrera. “Dick Lee Pastry stands out even among the most egregious perpetrators of wage theft in San Francisco. They paid wages well below the legal minimum, demanded long hours with no overtime, instructed workers to lie to labor investigators, and retaliated against those who sought to protect their rights. I hope today’s lawsuit sends a strong message to other would-be wage cheats about the seriousness of our resolve to protect working men and women in San Francisco. I applaud the Office of Labor Standards Enforcement for their investigation of this case, and I’m grateful to the Chinese Progressive Association for their community outreach efforts.”

See you after the jump

(more…)

Tent City in SoMA! Are People Lining Up On 10th Street Just to Get the New DPW Food Truck Permits?

Monday, March 7th, 2011

Well, first it was all like this, and then it was all like this, but now it’s like you can’t legally sell food from a food truck how many hundreds of feet from a legacy restaurant? Isn’t that called corporate welfare when you try to protect struggling bidnesses from competition? (Alls I know is that the Golden Gate Restaurant Association thinks this whole sitch is “fair,” which is a big fat clue that it’s not.)

Anywho, this was the scene on (speaking of corporate welfare) Tenth Street in SoMA betwixt Market and Mission over the weekend on Saturday. The white signs say “DPW Mobile Food Permits – Line Starts Here,” or something. (I could have broken stride to check, I could have stopped to actually talk with these poor souls, you know, to find out, but I haven’t renewed my journalistic license since the SFPD started charging $50 a year…)

Is the new mobile food fad just another “DEAD END” for gastronomic entrepreneurs? (Not sure if this new gold rush is ending or if its still beginning, actually.)

Click to expand

Anyway, Bon Courage, Tent City denizens!

Herrera Beats GGRA, Supreme Court Rejects Attack on Healthy San Francisco

Monday, June 28th, 2010

Well, that will be it for now from the Golden Gate  Restaurant Association vis-a-vis Healthy San Francisco. They should have made a deal, it would seem.

All the deets:

‘Healthy San Francisco’ stands, as U.S. Supreme Court denies legal challenge. Rejection ends four-year legal battle over popular universal health care program that serves more than 53,000 San Franciscans

 

SAN FRANCISCO (June 28, 2010) — The U.S. Supreme Court this morning denied review to a legal challenge to a key provision of “Healthy San Francisco,” conclusively ending a contentious four-year attack aimed at gutting the City’s popular universal health care program.  At issue in the lawsuit brought by Golden Gate Restaurant Association in 2006 was whether the federal Employee Retirement Income Security Act, or ERISA, preempts local laws such as San Francisco’s from requiring ongoing employer spending for employee health benefits, or alternative payments to a local government.  In rejecting GGRA’s petition for review on this, the last day of the Supreme Court’s 2009-10 term, the high court effectively sustained a Sept. 30, 2008 Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruling upholding the legality of the City’s employer spending requirement for health care. 

Ever more deets, and a timeline, after the jump

(more…)