Posts Tagged ‘hastings’

See SFPD Interim Chief Toney Chaplin and Jeff Adachi at “Panel Discussion on Race and Policing” – UC Hastings on Wednesday, September 28th, 2016

Tuesday, September 27th, 2016

All the deets:

“Panel Discussion on Race and Policing

September 28, 2016
3:30 – 5:00 pm
UC Hastings College of the Law
Louis B. Mayer Lounge
198 McAllister Street

In the last few years, a series of tragic incidents raised public attention to a serious crisis of trust between police departments and the communities they serve, particularly communities of color and of low income. These incidents have led to vocal riots and to the rise of the Black Lives Matter movement, leading to violent clashes between activists and police officers. What are the roots of this crisis? How can racialized practices in policing be understood and addressed? What is being done, and what should be done, to heal the broken trust between the police and the community? This panel on Race & Policing will feature voices of activists, police officers, lawyers, community-relations officials, and academics, in an effort to tackle these important questions.


Race and Policing Panel at UC Hastings
WHO: Panelists include San Francisco Public Defender Jeff Adachi, San Francisco Police Department Interim Chief Toney Chaplin, UC Berkeley Professor Nikki Jones, Former Director of the DOJ’s Community Service Relations Service Grande Lum, Alameda County District Attorney Nancy O’Malley, and UC Hastings Professor Hadar Aviram (moderator).
WHAT: UC Hastings is hosting a panel of leaders in the criminal justice field — activists, police officers, lawyers, community-relations officials, and academics — to discuss the complicated relationship between race and policing.
WHEN: Wednesday, September 28, 2016, 3:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
WHERE: Louis B. Mayer Lounge, UC Hastings College of the Law, 198 McAllister Street, San Francisco, CA 94102 OR watch via livestream
REGISTRATION: Event is free and open to the public. Registration online here.

An Endangered Species: The Solitary Squad Car Used by UC Hastings Law School “Public Safety Officers” in the Twitterloin

Wednesday, May 18th, 2016

This is it – they have just this one, as seen on McAllister:

IMG_5650 copy

All the deets

“UC Hastings-UCSF Public Safety Partnership Proposal – Presenting the initial UC Hastings proposal to replace the college’s Public Safety Department with the University of California San Francisco Police Department.

A Public Meeting was held this morning to present the initial UC Hastings proposal to replace the college’s Public Safety Department with the University of California San Francisco Police Department (UCSFPD). All UC Hastings students, faculty, and staff were invited to attend.

UC Hastings General Counsel Elise Traynum welcomed attendees and introduced the proposal.

“The UC Hastings community is in need of additional protection which can only be provided by a police department,” said Traynum. “An advantage to entering into an agreement with UCSFPD is access to a broad array of basic police services and support services that the college cannot fund.”

“It is proposed that UCSFPD would handle all street patrols, investigations, and crime prevention services, emergency management functions in the event of life-threatening disasters, homeland security and related community policing responsibilities,” said Traynum.

Traynum also outlined options for the five affected UC Hastings Public Safety officer’s unit members, listing four possibilities: 1) Officers may be hired as police officers for UCSFPD if they meet requisite qualifications; or 2) Officers may be hired as security guards, or security guard supervisors, for UCSFPD if they meet required qualifications; or, 3) Officers may be hired for positions at UC Hastings if they meet requisite qualifications; or, 4) for Officers who do not qualify for jobs with the UCSFPD or alternative position with UC Hastings, or officers who elect to not apply for these, the College would consider buying them out, at an amount to be determined.

Finally, Traynum underscored that reducing labor costs is not the motivation for contracting out public safety. “The motivation for contracting out public safety is to give the UC Hastings community access to a broad array of basic police services and support services that the college could not fund.”

UCSFPD Chief Mike Denson then presented “A Study of a Public Safety Partnership” (click here to view), and highlighted the department’s commitment to safety and security externally and internally, including the physical and emotional well-being of students.

Time for public comment was provided following the presentation, and the UC Hastings Public Safety Officers Association (PSOA) and representatives were also offered the opportunity to present a counter proposal at the meeting.

Acting Chancellor & Dean David Faigman called the input “enormously helpful” and laid out two basic principles he and the college will follow in making this decision. First, that any change would be to create a more secure and safer campus. Second, that UC Hastings will do the best we can for our current officers. He also noted that UC Hastings does not plan to raise tuition to improve safety and security. “If in the end it doesn’t make sense for our campus, we’re not going to do it,” concluded Faigman. “And if it does, we’ll do so in a conscientious manner.”

The college will hold a follow-up public meeting in April to present its final proposal. Details will be publicized widely.

Alex A.G. Shapiro
Director of External Relations
UC Hastings College of the Law
Office: (415) 581-8842
Cell: (415) 813-9214

Law School Chancellors Reviewing 16-Year-Old Movies: Frank Wu of UC Hastings on Ronin (1998)

Thursday, April 10th, 2014

Here it is, apropos of nothing, from Frank H. Wu, Chancellor & Dean of UC Hastings College of the Law on the HuffPo.

But we’re not talking about the recent film 47 Ronin, non non. We’re talking about plain old Ronin, from when you were in elementary school, Gentle Reader.

Now the thing about Dean Frank is that he’s new in town. It’s unfortunate he’s already embraced certain corrupt local institutions, such as the Tenderloin Housing Clinic. Granted, he sometimes needs to deal with such entities to get his job done, but he doesn’t display an awareness of the fact he’s living in the most corrupt big American city west of Chicago. For instance.

No matter, I entirely agree that Ronin is worth your time. (And I’m shocked that its Rotten Tomatoes score is down in the ’60s. This is one of the best films you can see with a rating that low.)

You oughtta watch the whole thing.  

“The University of California’s Hastings College of the Law (UC Hastings or Hastings) is a top tier public law school in San Francisco, California, located in the Civic Center neighborhood. Founded in 1878 by Serranus Clinton Hastings, the first Chief Justice of California, it was the first law school of the University of California…”

The Happy Morning Joggers of the Tenderloin – Could This Be the New UC Hastings Running Club, the “Legal Eagles?”

Wednesday, August 21st, 2013

Usually when people run in the corrupt Twitterloin / Civic Center / Tenderloin area, it’s because they’re either victims or perpetrators, right?

So just jogging around for fun, well, that’s something new I think.

Click to expand

All the deets from the oldest and largest law school in the West:

Purpose: To encourage healthy living and life balance through regular athletic activity; to promote a positive image of UC Hastings to the larger Bay Area community through involvement in charity runs; and to foster a sense of community at UC Hastings”

Quintin Mecke, Second Place Finisher in Mayoral Race and Now Director at Barbary Coast Consulting, Yells at Traffic, Good-Naturedly

Tuesday, August 6th, 2013

And then he got out of the saddle to pump up the steepest block of McAllister what’s on the Snickerdoodle route.*

Click to expand

*It’s the UnWiggle, it’s the better choice to get west of Divisadero from Market

If Bicycles Had Sidecars, This is What They Would Look Like

Monday, February 18th, 2013

Thought this unusual ride seen on the Hastings Cutoff route was a bicycle sidecar.

At first anyway.


Click to expand

Jitsu wa, Gentle Reader, it just the arm of an autumn sweater dragging along.

A mystery solved!

Cyclists Have the Choice of Going North or South over Alamo Heights – Which is Better, McAllister Street or the Wiggle?

Wednesday, February 13th, 2013

If you want to get there and back again from the Panhandle bike path and Mid Market (and beyond), your best choice is McAllister Street.

It’s waaaaaaay better than The Wiggle route.


Well, why not? McAllister Street (aka the Hastings Cutoff) is shorter and swifter and straighter and safer

Actually, The Wiggle is The Rookie’s Choice, full of part-timers like CW Nevius (oh he just quit cycling in The City, hardly surprising) and fast fixie riders who don’t know any better.

And The Movement prefers the Wiggle, for some unknown reason. But if you just want to get from A to B, then its Market McAllister Divis and eventually Fell for you.

Like this – that’s UC Hastings, your Hastings Cutoff lodestar, there in the background on the left: 

Click to expand

So you climb a bit more using McAl, like 20 more vertical feet if you add up all the ups and downs, but big whoop.

All right, see you out there on the HC!


Tuesday, October 23rd, 2012

The headline says it all, but here’s the entire release:


San Francisco — The Second District (San Francisco) PTA leadership recommended in July a dual endorsement of state ballot measures, Propositions 30 and 38, to the California State PTA after hearing from PTA members across the City that funding education was a high priority. At that time, the State PTA held its “Yes” on Prop 38 and voted to approve a “Neutral” position on Prop 30.

In light of recent public polling and campaign dynamics with both initiatives, and again with the encouragement of its members, the District PTA leadership is re-recommending the State PTA take a “Yes” position on Prop 30 to add to its current “Yes” on Prop 38 at the State PTA Board of Managers Meeting October 27.

It is critical that education be funded at a higher level, or at the minimum, maintain current funding in order for all of California’s children to be prepared to be successful in college, career and life. Either Prop 30 or Prop 38 must pass for this to happen. The District PTA also strongly encourages both campaigns to refrain from negative messaging about the other to increase the possibility that at least one measure will receive the required 50% + 1 votes.

Prop 30 would prevent further cuts to K-12 public schools and higher education funding through an increase of around $6 billion per year for 7 years to the state’s general fund budget. Prop 38 would increase funding to K-12 schools, early education and school bond debt payments by $10-11 billion per year for 12 years. Prop 38’s increase in funding would greatly mitigate the result of state education budget cuts of over $20 billion statewide and the laying off of over 40,000 educators over the last three years alone.

For more information: and

For a comparison of both propositions go to

I don’t know, if San Francisco’s Nate Ballard and Planet Neptune’s Molly Munger want to drive over the cliff* holding hands ala Thelma and Louise, that’s their business:

Image Photoshopped slightly, courtesy of the Gavin Newsom for Governor Lt. Governor campaign

But I’ll tell you, the People of the State of California are not going to follow them.

Hey Molly, if you’re so great, why don’t you just give all your inherited money to the California Teachers Association no strings attached?

You know, instead of driving over the cliff with Prop 30 stashed in the trunk?

*In a Porsche paid for by Daddy, of course.


“Viewpoint: State Bar Disaster Team Overreaches” During the Latest Chevron Fire – But Actually, Not

Tuesday, August 21st, 2012

Hey, check it, from Richard Zitrin, a professor at UC Hastings and of counsel to San Francisco’s Carlson, Calladine & Peterson:

Viewpoint: State Bar Disaster Team Overreaches.

Now here’s my viewpoint:

State Bar Disaster Team Doesn’t Overreach.

There we go, now it’s even-Steven.

Actually, our State Bar should have a DC-3 on standby so that its disaster team could more quickly parachute into places like Richmond CA, you know, just like D-Day, you know, When Disaster Strikes.

Actually, our State Bar wants people like attorney Nick Haney to call the whaaaaaaaaambulance, to complain about how the State Bar street team is just like the Waffen-SS. It sends a message to all the others.

Keep on keeping on, State Bar Disaster Team!

PS: Oh BTW, exactly zero people were hospitalized due to the latest Chevron refinery fire / explosion / incident. So the chances of any one person garnering “hundreds of thousands of dollars” from watching soot zoom up thousands of feet into the troposphere are, similarly, exactly zero. 

It’s Food Day: Watch “Food Deserts: Legal, Social, and Public Health Challenges” Live from UC Hastings at 1:00 PM

Monday, October 24th, 2011

OMG, it’s Food Day 2011, so check the link to see what’s going on about the Bay Area today.

Here’s the manifesto:

At UC Hastings in Civic Center, the UCSF / UC Hastings Consortium on Law, Science & Health Policy will put on Food Deserts: Legal, Social, and Public Health Challenges starting at 1:00 PM.

Watch it on the livestream, why not? Or see about heading over to this free event yourself.

All the deets:

“Food Deserts: Legal, Social, and Public Health Challenges

Start: 10/24/2011 from 1:00 PM to 7:00 PM
Location: 200 McAllister, Alumni Reception Center

The UCSF / UC Hastings Consortium on Law, Science & Health Policy is sponsoring a conference entitled “Food Deserts: Legal, Social, and Public Health Challenges” on Food Day, October 24, 2011.
The conference will bring together scholars from the health sciences and the law, as well as policymakers, activists, and food industry members, to discuss two important aspects of “food deserts,” places where access to a nutritionally-adequate diet is severely restricted.

One panel, Nourishing Our Neighborhoods: Insights from Law, Planning, and Industry, will cover the broad issue of geographical food deserts, usually urban areas inhabited by mostly-poor people whose transportation and finances are limited, where food sellers are predominantly small stores that cannot stock a wide variety of fresh food items, and where full-service grocery stores hesitate to locate. Are there policies (such as those in zoning rules) that could be changed to enable oases in these food deserts? What impact does, for example, the addition of a full-service grocery store have on the health of the neighboring area?

Another panel, Food and Nutrition in Correctional Institutions, will consider issues relevant to prisons and jails. While food offerings must meet certain basic caloric and nutritional requirements, the institutional nature of food preparation and food service might make that food less than appealing, and the healthier elements of meals might well be those not regularly or fully consumed. The supplemental food offerings – those for sale in these institutions – are not likely to be nutritious. Some research suggests that improved nutrition in prisons leads to improved penal outcomes. If that is so, what policy changes should be implemented? Would such changes be cost-beneficial, considering penal outcomes and the government’s responsibility for health care of prisoners?

At 5 pm, Dr. David Kessler, former Commissioner of the United States Food and Drug Administration and Professor of Pediatrics and Epidemiology and Biostatistics, UCSF, will give the keynote address on The End of Overeating. This conference will be free and open to the public.”

Ever more deets after the jump