Posts Tagged ‘Honda’

Starley-Davidson

Friday, June 27th, 2014

That would be a Star of David atop a Honda Goldwing, aka the “Japanese Harley-Davidson,” sort of.

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I could see Warren Hellman driving around like this…

Seen on the Street: “Alien” Fish

Monday, April 14th, 2014

Sacrilicious!

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Close Parking on the Streets of San Francisco

Thursday, February 6th, 2014

Uh, this is too close:

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Photo: If You Park Your Car Like This on the Sidewalk in Front of Your Garage, Some Pedestrian Just Might Kick It

Monday, November 11th, 2013

Boy, if I parked an aging Honda like this and then came back to find part of its right side all stove in like this, I’d think, “Gee, maybe some ped got mad and kicked my car right where s/he wanted to walk.”

And the I wouldn’t park on the fucking sidewalk anymore.

As seen on Masonic, home of absurdly wide (22 feet(!) in some places) sidewalks filled with not too many pedestrians and a whole bunch of cars:

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Packt Like Sardines: How Many Cars Can You Put Into Just One San Francisco Parking Lot?

Wednesday, April 24th, 2013

Well, at least for this particularly oddly-shaped piece of real estate on Main Street near Folsom, the answer was this many:

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“Last in, first out.” Click to expand.

I don’t know if this lot in SoMA is still around. The photo was taken from the office of a billionaire who was quite solicitous owing to a project he wanted to kick off before he himself kicked off.

Here’s what I wrote a half decade back:

It might be a pain to park here, under the shadow of the new Infinity San Francisco towers, but at least you won’t get the boot, or get into a chain reaction accident, or get all messy. Of course, if you work for San Francisco Honda, then just park wherever - the sidewalk, for example.

Lastly, DO NOT PAY THIS MAN!

If You Think Not Making a Right Turn at 6th and Market Street is Somewhat Verboten, Just Try Making a Left

Friday, March 8th, 2013

As this driver just did, loaded up with household goods for a trip back up north to Oregon or Washington or whichever state is named on the license plate.

Thusly:

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What drivers do is get stuck on Market outbound and then they see the No Left signs one after the other, 2nd, New Monty, 3rd, 4th, 5th and then they get frustrated and make a left on 6th Street, as here.

And when you make that kind of move, the cops can see you from all around.

(What we should have are signs saying No Left Turns Next 2 Miles, or something, like what we have on 19th Avenue, an official State Highway.)

Of course, if the driver were on Market heading inbound at this very same intersection, then a right turn would be mandatory and going straight just might get her a ticket as well. The thing about that, tho, is that the chances of getting a ticket for not turning right is way less than 1% but, well, making a left you are just begging for a ticket.

(Which you can just throw away once you get back to home state, if you want, IDK.)

What a Dream: The Gasoline-Powered Bicycles of Market Street

Tuesday, November 6th, 2012

See the exhaust pipe?

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This is how Honda got started after WWII, with the Model A.

Skruuuunch! What Happens When You Forget That Your Bike Is Sitting Upright in Your Pickup

Tuesday, August 14th, 2012

The tiny, low-clearance garages of new construction in San Francisco have claimed another victim, 11foot8.com style.

See? This is post crash, with the driver backing out for damage assessment:

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When I had a pickup, I’d just throw bikes in the back horizontal-like, but maybe there’s not enough room to do that in a Honda.

Does DPT / MUNI / SFMTA Have a Pinterest Photo Account?! How About This Shot from David Waggoner?

Friday, August 3rd, 2012

Here’s, and I’m seriously, here’s MUNI’s Pinterest account:

How our riders see Muni

Oh mercy!

Now here’s how I see you, MUNI. I see you as the worst large public transit agency in America.

Here’s my submission via David Waggoner and the Fog City Journal

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Wow, a Pinterest. I didn’t see that one coming.

P.S. MUNI sucks!

The Horrible Pedestrians of Masonic Avenue – See How They Run – A Darwin Award Loser

Monday, July 30th, 2012

Here’s how some people cross six lanes of Masonic at Ewing Terrace:

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Now, is this kind of thing legal? Well sure, if you’re walking – this could be one of those unmarked crosswalk deals.

But it’s not legal to cross here if you’re running. Sorry pedestrian.

(Our FUBARed beyond all reason SFMTA has a plan to put a traffic light in here whenever it can get its grand mal Masonic Street Design off the ground.)

Now a little further up the hill, we lost a ped who was similarly jaywalking earlier this year. I guess we could blame accidents like that the 30 MPH speed limit in front of Trader Joe’s, but that’s not how I’d look at it.

I’d look at it by trying to get inside the peds’ heads to try to think of a way to get them to not kill themselves.

Oh well.

Masonic Avenue Street Design Study

Engineering hearing on proposed changes, May 13, 2011

Masonic Street Redesign Study final report (PDF)

The survey results from the third community meeting, held on September 30, 2010, at San Francisco Day School (PDF), are available.

About the Project

The primary goal of the Masonic Avenue Street Design Study is to identify how Masonic Avenue between Geary Boulevard and Fell Street can safely and efficiently accommodate the needs of all roadway users, including but not limited to pedestrians, bicyclists, motorists and Muni. The project is funded by the San Francisco County Transportation Authority through the Prop K half-cent local transportation sales tax program.

Objectives:

1. Engage representatives of all constituencies within the community who would be impacted by changes to Masonic Avenue including, but not limited to, residents on Masonic Avenue, residents on side-streets, merchants, school representatives, bicyclists, Muni customers and pedestrians.

2. Improve transit operation.

3. Improve pedestrian and non-motorized access to transit.

4. Increase the safety of pedestrian crossings.

5. Increase motorist compliance with traffic rules and regulations.

6. Reduce the number of vehicular collisions, especially those involving pedestrians and bicyclists.

7. Support neighborhood vitality by creating a more inviting and accommodating public realm.

Community meeting presentations

The following presentations from the various community meetings are available from the San Francisco Planning Department website:

First community meeting presentation, June 15, 2010, Day School, PDF, 7MB
Second community meeting presentation, Aug. 10, 2010, Day School, PDF, 7MB
Third community meeting presentation, Sept. 30, 2010, Day School, PDF, 6MB

James Shahamiri
415.701.4732
james.shahamiri@sfmta.com