Posts Tagged ‘How the Top 50 Nonprofits Do Social Media’

Does CA Really Need a “Social Media Privacy Act?” No Matter, SB 1349, the Job Interview Facebook Password Law, is Here

Friday, May 25th, 2012

Uhhhhhhhhhhh, I’m not going to articulate myself on this one.

But you, you go right ahead, feel free to tell your buds what you think. (But first, please email me your FB account names / passwords, and your intimate photos and whatnot.)

All right, off you go:

“California Senate Approves Social Media Privacy Act - Yee’s SB 1349 will prohibit employers, colleges from seeking Facebook, Twitter passwords

SACRAMENTO – On a bipartisan 28-5 vote, the California Senate today approved legislation authored by Senator Leland Yee (D-San Francisco/San Mateo) to stop employers from formally requesting or demanding employees or job applicants provide their social media usernames and passwords.

Yee’s bill also prohibits public and private colleges and universities from requiring such information of students.

The bill comes after a growing number of businesses, public agencies, and colleges around the country are asking job seekers, workers, and students for their Facebook and Twitter account information.

“I am pleased by today’s overwhelming vote to end this unacceptable invasion of personal privacy,” said Yee. “The practice of employers or colleges demanding social media passwords is entirely unnecessary and completely unrelated to someone’s performance or abilities.”

In addition to the privacy of students and workers, accessing social media accounts may also invade the privacy of family members and friends who thought they only were sharing information with their own social media network.

“These social media outlets are often for the purpose of individuals to share private information – including age, marital status, religion, sexual orientation and personal photos – with their closest friends and family,” said Yee. “This information is illegal for employers and colleges to use in making employment and admission decisions and has absolutely no bearing on a person’s ability to do their job or be successful in the classroom.”

“SB 1349 is a significant step towards securing Californians’ constitutional right to privacy, both online and offline, in the workplace and in school,” said Jon Fox, Consumer Advocate for CALPIRG.

“If employers are permitted to access the private information of job applicants, unscrupulous hiring managers will be given greater leeway to circumvent anti-discrimination laws,” said Joe Ridout of Consumer Action.

Rather than formally requesting passwords and usernames, some employers have demanded applicants and employees to sit down with managers to review their social media content or fully print out their social media pages. SB 1349 will also prohibit this practice.

Shannon Minter, Legal Director for National Center for Lesbian Rights, said that the practice of requesting social media passwords is the equivalent to reading a personal diary, and also LGBT employees, job applicants, and students already face significant obstacles when applying for schools and jobs.

Minter said that SB 1349 helps ensures individuals are “judged by their qualifications and performance, rather than elements of their private life.”

IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law professor Lori Andrews, who specializes in Internet privacy, told the Associated Press that these practices even when given voluntarily should not be allowed.

“Volunteering is coercion if you need a job,” Andrews told the AP.

Johnny Veloz, an unemployed photographer, told KCRA Sacramento that he was asked for his Facebook password during a recent job interview. Veloz was denied the job after refusing to provide the information.

“For me, that’s rude and it’s not respectful,” Veloz told KCRA. “Someone has privacy and you expect them to respect that.”

Yee’s bill would also prohibit employers and colleges from demanding personal email addresses and login information of employees, applicants, and students.

SB 1349 will now be considered by the State Assembly before heading to the Governor.”

And oh, if I ever crafted a “social media privacy act,” I can just about guarantee you that Facebook WOULD NOT LIKE IT. Not one bit.

Just saying.

Craigslist Founder Craig Newmark Releases Infographic Detailing the Use of Social Media by Nonprofits

Thursday, October 13th, 2011

Now, I myself can’t see Craig’s infographic cause I’m not on the Facebook, but you, well go ahead and “like” him and then you’ll be rewarded by getting to see what Craig wants to show you.

A photo from his FB:

Click to expand

All the deets:

“SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 13, 2011 — Craig Newmark, founder of craigslist and craigconnects, today released an infographic detailing the use of social media by leading nonprofit organizations. The infographic is available for viewing on Newmark’s Facebook page at http://on.fb.me/r7pm9H

“How the Top 50 Nonprofits Do Social Media” is a fact-filled, comprehensive look at which leading nonprofit organizations are most proactively and effectively using social media channels of communication like Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Flickr, LinkedIn, and RSS feeds.

Do the highest earning nonprofits use social media the most effectively? Are they the most engaging? How are people responding and interacting? The infographic is intended to help answer those questions.

Findings revealed by the infographic include:

– 92 percent of the top 50 nonprofits have at least one social media
presence on their website homepage.
— PBS is the nonprofit organization with the most followers on Twitter -
840,653.
— The nonprofit following the most people on Twitter is the American
Cancer Society – 200,522.
— The American Red Cross was the first organization on the list to create
a Twitter account.
— Food for the Poor is the most talkative nonprofit on the list on
Facebook, and has posted 220 posts over the course of two months.
— The organization with the highest net income, the YMCA, only posted 19
times to Facebook in two months, but has over 24,000 fans.

Newmark, who often speaks at conferences on the value of social media outreach for nonprofits, said it appears that income does not increase a nonprofit’s visibility and interactions in the social media world. As shown on the infographic, some of the most social media savvy organizations are in the bottom quarter bracket in terms of income, yet they are clearly active on social media.

“The deal is, it’s not about money, it’s about getting people to talk with each other to make people’s lives better,” said Newmark.

Visit Newmark’s Facebook page for the infographic, which includes an explanation of the methodology and sources used in its development.

craigconnects is Newmark’s personal, Web-based initiative aimed at helping people work together for the common good using the Internet. The initiative spotlights organizations and agencies working in the areas of veterans and military families, public diplomacy, open government, back-to-basics journalism, consumer protection, and the use of technology for the common good. For more information, visit http://www.craigconnects.org

Oh, and here’s Craig’s sked, if you want to keep up with him:

10/29 OR Net Impact
11/2 SF Innovation Uncensored
11/9 NY IAVA Gala
11/17-18 NY Next Gen Charity