Posts Tagged ‘identification’

The Least SFPD Cop-Looking SFPD Cop I’ve Ever Seen, I Think – What Kind of Police Uniform is This?

Monday, August 18th, 2014

So what’s this, yellow for visibility instead of SFPD blue? No seven-pointed star? No oro en paz, fierro en guerra screaming chicken on the shoulder patch, which I don’t know about since I couldn’t see any patch from the side anyway.

I’m forced to assume* that you’d be able to tell dude’s SFPD from the front.

Here he is, on Randy Shaw’s traffic sewer, the first block of troubled Turk Street, in the twoubled Twitterloin:

7J7C5748 copy

I approve not, Gentle Reader.

*Or maybe he’s BART? I’m still not sure. In all my years, I’ve never had this much trouble ID’ing the SFPD.

Bacon Bacon NIMBYs Make Saturday Night Live: Client(s) of Ryan Patterson Now a National Laughingstock

Sunday, May 19th, 2013

I believe Bagdad By The Bay has the latest on our Bacon Bacon saga at Ashbury Market near the corner of Frederick in not-so-scenic Ashbury Heights.

Well this wacky story just went national today on Saturday Night Live – here’s Weekend Update co-host Amy Poehler, via Brock Keeling of SFist:

Perhaps not that funny but at least now more people are mocking attorney Ryan Patterson and his unknown client(s).

At least now there’s an upside to this flagrant NIMBYism.

So feel free to add this incident…

…to the time this Kramer-esque sign hung off the back of nearby 1965 Page…

…and, for that matter, Kramer’s famous run in:

Cosmo Kramer vs. Kenny Rogers Roasters, Inc.

Bacon Bacon ‏@BaconBaconSF: “Apparently bacon bacon on SNL tonight!! Weekend update. Here we go folks. Here we go.” #baconbaconsf#snl

On It Goes…

National Transportation Safety Board Holds Tesla Automotive Employee Responsible for Fatal Air Crash in Palo Alto

Monday, November 28th, 2011

(As always, If You Assume That Any Given Plane Crash is Due to Pilot Error, You’ll Probably Be Right.)

Here’s an article about the new NTSB report.

Does it make sense to commute to Los Angeles for work, assuming you had a pilot’s license and an airplane? I don’t know.

Does it make sense to listen to the advice of your air traffic controller concerning the advisability of taking off into heavy fog, even if you don’t have to? Yes it does.

Is there a reason why pilots are told to turn over the Bay after takeoff? Yes there is.

Oh well.

Here’s what people down Palo Alto Way are saying.

And here‘s the “chilling recording” from a SpotShotter tower. (It’s about what you’d expect, with crashing noises and the yelling of the day care center kids who saw the crash.)

The former N5225J, a Cessna 310R with relatively new, perfectly-fine-at-the-time engines: 

(I’ll tell you, I don’t know why our federal government subsidizes Tesla Automotive (and for that matter, General Monkeybusiness in Detroit). Was Tesla paying for the avgas that this Cessna was burning? Does Tesla reimburse CEO Elon Musk for the jet fuel that he burns as he joyrides around the world, as is his wont? I think Tesla used to, but I don’t know about these days. You know, for an electric car company what’s produced not a whole bunch of electric cars, Tesla seems to burn up a lot of petroleum…)

Anyway, here’s the summary – the whole thing you’ll find after the jump.

NTSB Identification: WPR10FA136

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation

Accident occurred Wednesday, February 17, 2010 in Palo Alto, CA

Probable Cause Approval Date: 11/22/2011

Aircraft: CESSNA 310R, registration: N5225J

Injuries: 3 Fatal.

The pilot departed the airport in near-zero visibility instrument meteorological conditions, and shortly after takeoff, struck a power pole and power lines before impacting terrain. Review of recorded air traffic control tower (ATCT) transmissions revealed that the pilot was initially given his instrument flight rules (IFR) clearance to turn right to a heading of 060 degrees and climb to 3,000 feet. Shortly after verifying his IFR clearance, the pilot received his IFR release from the ATCT controller and was informed that the runway was not visible to the controller. The controller further informed the pilot that takeoff was at his own risk. Shortly after, the controller notified the pilot that he had two minutes for his IFR release, before it expired. The pilot stated that he did not hear a “cleared for takeoff” instruction from the controller. The controller responded that he could not clear the pilot for takeoff, due to not having the runway environment in sight and that “the release is all yours and it’s at your own risk sir.” The pilot acknowledged the transmission and proceeded to take off. One witness, who was adjacent to the accident site, reported that she observed an airplane “suddenly appear from the fog” left of her position. The witness stated that she continued to watch the airplane fly in a level or slightly nose up attitude until it impacted power lines.

Accident site evidence was indicative of a level impact with a power pole about 50 feet above ground level (agl) and at a high airspeed. All major structural components of the airplane were located within the wreckage debris path. Examination of the airframe, engines and propellers disclosed no evidence of any preimpact mechanical anomaly. Weather conditions reported five minutes prior to the accident were wind variable at 5 knots, visibility 1/8th mile, fog, and vertical visibility of 100 feet agl. Weather conditions recorded by the ATCT 11 minutes after the time of the accident were visibility 1/16th mile, fog, and a vertical visibility of 100 feet agl.

Local law enforcement provided recordings from a sound recording system, which captured the accident sequence. The recordings were coupled with airport surveillance radar to interpolate a flightpath for the airplane. The interpolated flightpath indicated an approximate 45-degree left turn shortly after departure to the area of initial impact with the power pole and power lines. A sound spectrum study determined both engines were operating near full power.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The pilot’s failure follow the standard instrument departure as instructed, and his failure to attain a sufficient altitude to maintain clearance from power lines during takeoff in instrument meteorological conditions.”

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Can You Get a Perfect Score on the Eurocentric Flags of Market Street Identification Test? Probably Not!

Thursday, January 13th, 2011

I was stumped by number one. (Is that red or orange? I figured it out a little later bit still, I was stumped at first.)

A perfect score is 11/11 although feel free to throw in the three at the bottom for an even 14, if you want to boost your results.

Don’t cheat or anything.

Click to expand:

Attention Bay Area Pilots: Don’t Get Too Creative with Your Airplane’s “N” Number

Tuesday, April 20th, 2010

Here’s what you can’t do with your aircraft’s tail number. What you can’t do is get all creative to the point where people can’t read it.

‘Cause when you go flat-hatting over San Francisco’s Ferry Building in your aging Piper PA-34-200T Seneca II, you need to have your license plate legible for tout le monde to see. That’s how the system works.

What you can’t do is take away the middle part of the ID numbers leaving all the 0′s, 3′s, 6′s, and 8′s looking alike. That don’t fly.

The turbocharged Piper Seneca II, for the times when your Saratoga can’t get you there fast enough:

Click to expand, not that it will help legibility. 

Anyway, people need to know who pilots are for the times they land on the wrong end of the runway ‘n stuff.

D’accord? Oui, d’accord. 

Now, Go Forth And Sin No More.

Never an unkind word need be said/
about your life overhead

Popular San Francisco ID Card Program Has People Lining Up at 7:00 AM

Tuesday, February 10th, 2009

This was the scene recently in front of San Francisco’s City Hall at 7:00 AM, an hour before opening. 

Click to expand

 

It seems the City’s ID Card program is proving popular.

Hacker Chris Paget Can Detect Your Passport Card From Inside His Car!

Tuesday, February 3rd, 2009

Do you have an official U.S. Passport Card in your wallet that you use to reenter the U.S after a trip to Mexico or Canada? Well that’s your secret, unless you’ve been walking on the streets of San Francisco. If so, there’s a chance that hacker Chris Paget has detected the RFID chip in your card from his minivan.

Check the video.

Chris has his sights set on the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative. Looks like a direct hit from here.

Welcome to the Brave New World.

How to Get Your Official San Francisco ID Card, Program Kicks Off Today

Thursday, January 15th, 2009

First of all, if you’re asking yourself how on Earth you could possibly use one of these cards, then don’t worry about this whole program, as it’s not really for you. Moving on…

Here’s the procedure for getting a card.  And here’s where you can use it. Oakland-based Capture Technologies says that these $15 cards are “protected from forgery, fraud, tampering or alteration.” Are they really harder to tamper with than your driver license from the DMV? Who knows.  

Anyway, deets after the jump.

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