Posts Tagged ‘Imperial’

Forget About the Chrysler Bankruptcy, Get Your Imperial Out and Drive, Drive, Drive

Wednesday, July 8th, 2009

I’m thinking this is a 1965 (Chrysler) Imperial Crown - check it out as it makes an appearance on the 101 freeway. Now you’d probably prefer to drive a 1960 model or even a Chrysler 300 letter series, but this white whale will do in a pinch.

Crank up the oldies on the AM radio and change the station whenever they start talking about having to bail out Detroit. No matter, this aging rig will certainly get you more friends than Sinatra.

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Sic transit gloria Chrysler

Know Your Legion of Honor Faberge Eggs: #8, the Kelch Rocaille

Friday, May 8th, 2009

The fantastic Artistic Luxury exhibit at the Legion of Honor Museum continues. Read all about it here and here.

But what about the Faberge Eggs? Here’s one from 1902: the Kelch Rocaille:

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Currently it’s owned by FAMSF Board of Trustees President Diane B. “Dede” Wilsey, but let’s not forget about its history:

“When the wealthy Russian heiress Varvara Bazanova married cash-poor nobleman Nikolai Ferdinandovich Kelkh (also spelled Kelch) in 1892, she obtained a noble title and he obtained access to her money. When Kelkh died two years later, the heiress married Nikolai’s younger brother, Alexander.

The Kelch Rocaille Egg, made by Faberge in 1902, was one of a series of seven ostensibly bought by Alexander as a gift for his wife, but in truth paid for with her money.”

Rocaille means “rococo” - and this thing certainly is rococo a gogo, quite ornate it is. And this could be your last chance to see it for a while ’cause the expiration date for all the famous Faberge eggs as well as the entire show is May 31, 2009.

Eggs, precious eggs!

Know Your Legion of Honor Faberge Eggs: #7 Pansy Egg

Sunday, April 19th, 2009

The fantastic Artistic Luxury exhibit at the Legion of Honor Museum continues. Read all about it here and here.

But what about the Faberge Eggs? Here’s one from 1899: The Green Eggs and Ham. Oops, how about the Pansy Egg (aka the Spinach Jade)? It’s your stereotypical Fab Egg, just begging to be opened:

 

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The heart surprise inside is made of varicolored gold, diamonds, rose-cut diamonds, pearls, strawberry enamel, white enamel and mother of pearl. It is a gold tripod on which is located an heart lined in diamonds and surmounted by the imperial crown with eleven scarlet medallions decorated with monograms. By pressing a button the tiny medallions are all opened, and portraits of each member of imperial family become visible.

And here it is - lots of little portraits:

Don’t look for Anastasia, as she was born a few years later in 1901.

Reading vertically, those in the front row are: Tsarevich George Alexandrovich, younger brother of the Tsar, and Grand Duke Alexander Michailovich, husband of the Grand duchess Xenia Alexandrovna, the Tsar’s sister. In the second row are: Tsar Nicholas II and Princess Irina, daughter of Grand Duke Alexander Michailovich and Grand Duchess Xenia. In the third row are: Grand Duchess Olga Nicolaievna, the first daughter of the Tsar and Tsarina, Grand Duchess Tatiana Nicolaievna, their second daughter, and Grand duke Michael Alexandrovich, the youngest brother of the Tsar. In the fourth row are: The Tsarina and Prince Andrew Alexandrovich, brother of Princess Irina. And in the fifth row are the Grand Duchesses Olga and Xenia Alexandrovna, sisters of the Tsar.

Whew!

Eggs, precious eggs!

Know Your Legion of Honor Faberge Eggs: #6 Red Cross Triptych

Saturday, April 18th, 2009

The fantastic Artistic Luxury exhibit at the Legion of Honor Museum continues. Read all about it here and here.

But what about the Faberge Eggs? Here’s one from 1915, the time of the Great War: The Red Cross Triptych:

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When World War I broke out in 1914, the trouble that had loomed at the edge of the Romanov’s awareness began to penetrate the protective shell of imperial privilege. In response to the suffering of their people, and in an attempt to present an image of patriotism and concerned involvement, Alexandra enrolled herself and her older daughters in nurses’ training and had the palaces converted into provisional hospitals to care for the increasing number of wounded.”

Needless to say, there weren’t too many Imperial Faberge eggs delivered after this one, what with the Feb Rev just a couple of years away. 

Nevertheless, eggs, precious eggs!

Know Your Legion of Honor Faberge Eggs: #5 Kelch Bonbonnière Egg

Saturday, April 11th, 2009

The fantastic Artistic Luxury exhibit at the Legion of Honor Museum continues. Read all about it here and here.

But what about the Faberge Eggs? Here’s one from 1903: The Kelch Bonbonnière Egg:

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It looks as if it could be an Imperial Egg, the likes of which were given to royal family members back in the day, but it’s a Kelch Egg. The unseen initials B.K. (no, not Blood Killas, nor British Knights, nor Berkelium, nor Burger King) tell the story – they stand for Barbara (aka Varvara) Kelch:

Every year from 1898 until 1904 Alexander Kelch ordered an Easter egg from Fabergé, modeled on the Imperial series, as a present for his wife, who no doubt also paid for them. No doubt, too, that the Kelch eggs cost them considerably more than those made for the Imperial family, given the parsimony of the Romanovs and the generosity of the nouveaux riches. The seven Kelch eggs are as fine, if not even more sumptuous, than those in the Imperial series.”

Mmmmm… sumptuous.

Eggs, precious eggs!

Know Your Legion of Honor Faberge Eggs: #4 Blue Serpent Clock

Saturday, April 4th, 2009

The fantastic Artistic Luxury exhibit at the Legion of Honor Museum continues. Read all about it here and here.

But what about the Faberge Eggs? Here’s one from 1895: The Blue Serpent Clock Egg:

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This egg spent a good part of its life with Grace Kelly:

The Egg entered the Princely Collection of Monaco in 1974, as a gift to Prince Rainier III in honor of his Silver Jubilee — the 25th anniversary of his accession to the Grimaldi throne. The Blue Serpent Egg quickly became one of Princess Grace’s most treasured possessions, according to his Serene Highness Prince Albert II, son of Prince Rainier and Princess Grace. She adored it and kept it on the desk in her private study. After her tragic death in 1982, Prince Rainier sealed her suite, preserving the room as a memorial and thereby keeping the Blue Serpent Egg from public view.

But it’s on display now. Check it out, while you can.

Eggs, precious eggs!

Know Your Legion of Honor Faberge Eggs: #3 Lapiz-Lazuli

Tuesday, March 31st, 2009

The fantastic Artistic Luxury exhibit at the Legion of Honor Museum continues. Read all about it here and here.

But what about the Faberge Eggs? Here’s one with a clouded history: the Lapis-Lazuli Hen Egg, complete with yellow enamel yolk:

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“Not much is known about the backgrounds of this Egg. Maybe it was made for one of the other members of the Imperial Family and maybe the future shall place this Egg in the category “Imperial Eggs” like the Resurrection Egg and the Spring Flowers Egg.”

Eggs, precious eggs!

Know Your Legion of Honor Faberge Eggs: #2, Rose Trellis

Monday, March 30th, 2009

The fantastic Artistic Luxury exhibit at the Legion of Honor Museum continues. Read all about it here and here.

But what about the Faberge Eggs? Here’s one from 1907, the Rose Trellis Egg:

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There’s a bit of mystery to its history:

The egg was created by Faberge’s workmaster, Henrik Wigström (Russian, 1862-1923) and is crafted of gold, green and pink enamel in various shades, portrait diamonds, rose-cut diamonds and satin lining. This Egg is enameled in translucent pale green and latticed with rose-cut diamonds and decorated with opaque light and dark pink enamel roses and emerald green leaves. A portrait diamond is set at either end of this Egg, the one at the base covering the date “1907″.

Originally the Egg contained an oval jeweled locket in which contained a hidden surprise, which is now lost. Only an impression on the satin lining now remains. This is considered the last of the opulent Easter eggs made without the constraints of a menacing outside world.

Eggs, precious eggs!

Know Your Legion of Honor Faberge Eggs: #1, Danish Palaces

Tuesday, March 24th, 2009

The fantastic Artistic Luxury exhibit at the Legion of Honor Museum continues. Read all about it here and here.

But what about the Faberge Eggs? For starters, here’s the Imperial Danish Palace Egg from 1890:

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The surprise inside this egg was made for a home-sick princess:

“The egg opens to reveal a folding ten-panel screen, depicting palaces and residences in Russia and in Princess Dagmar’s motherland Denmark. Maria Fyodorovna was before her marriage to Alexander III in 1866, the Danish Princess Dagmar.”

Eggs, precious eggs!