Posts Tagged ‘increase’

Unsponsored Link: The Time to Buy Tickets for the 2013 San Francisco Ballet Nutcracker is Now – Prices Going Up

Tuesday, September 24th, 2013

Here’s the latest from our San Francisco Ballet. If you think you might want to go this year, the time to buy is now. It’s not like you’re going to have a bunch of empty seats around you come December, so just get your ticks and put it in your calendar and you’re good to go.

All the deets:

“Don’t Miss Your Last Chance to Purchase Nutcracker Tickets at the Best Prices of the Season!

Tickets are going fast for SF Ballet’s spectacular production of Nutcracker! Current prices are guaranteed only through September 30, so dont miss your chance to enjoy the best seats at the very best prices of the season.

SF Ballet’s Nutcracker is an unforgettable holiday experience for all ages, featuring exquisite costumes and scenery, breathtaking effects, and spectacular dance by one of the world’s premier companies. Join us as the lights dim, the curtain rises, and the wonder of the holiday season comes to life in Nutcracker: a uniquely San Francisco tradition.

Order now before prices increase Oct 1!

Make Nutcracker a special occasion!
From our VIP Box Experience with an elegant reception, to Family Performances with special gifts for the first 500 children and complimentary treats at intermission, SF Ballet offers a variety of special performances to make Nutcracker an unforgettable experience.Learn more here!

Groups have more fun—and save up to 20%!
Gather 20 friends or colleagues and save up to 20% on select performances and seating areas. Learn more or call 415.865.6785.

Remember, after September 30, Nutcracker ticket prices are subject to change, so don’t delay, reserve your seats today!

Order Online: sfballet.org/nutcracker

Call:
 415.865.2000 Monday through Friday, 10am to 4pm

Visit sfballet.org/nutcracker for a full schedule of Nutcracker performances and events.

Hey, Guess Who’s Jacking Up Its Rates for 2013? PG&E, That’s Who – Why? PG&E Incompetence, San Bruno Explosion

Monday, December 31st, 2012

Hey PG&E! Are you going to end up turning a profit on the killing of those eight people down in San Bruno?

You remember them, right? The eight people you killed?

Thusly:

Click to expand

Hey is San Francisco shadow-Mayor Willie Brown still on PG&E’s payroll?

Sure, why not?

And hey, is the leader of the San Francisco Democrat party still on PG&E’s payroll?

Again, sure, why not?

Is that a good thing?

Oh well.

Here’s today’s happy talk from your energy monopoly:

“PG&E Rates to Change Modestly at Start Of 2013

Gas Rates Will Dip, Electric Rates Will Rise in Line with Inflation to Pay for Enhanced Safety, Reliability and Clean-Energy Programs

SAN FRANCISCO, Dec. 31, 2012 /PRNewswire/ — Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) said today that with the start of the new year, residential customers will see a significant decline in natural gas rates, and a modest increase in electric rates to cover the utility’s costs of maintaining and modernizing its system and of meeting a state mandate to buy more renewable energy. (See table below for average estimated bill impacts.)

PG&E’s average rates for residential gas customers will dip in January almost six percent compared to January 2012, thanks in part to lower wholesale costs for gas. However, customers should expect an increase in gas rates of about two percent as early as February, reflecting spending approved this month by the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) for PG&E’s Pipeline Safety Enhancement Plan. This plan, one of the most aggressive and comprehensive gas pipeline modernization programs in the United States, will help PG&E achieve its goal of operating the safest and most reliable natural gas system in the country.

Average residential electric rates will increase about 2.6 percent system-wide compared to last January, close to the rate of inflation in Northern California. The increase is driven primarily by higher costs for acquiring clean, renewable energy to meet state mandates, and by spending previously approved by the CPUC for operating, maintaining and upgrading PG&E’s electric generation and distribution systems. Thanks to such upgrades, electric customers recently experienced the lowest rate of outages in the utility’s history.

Customers will likely face another electric rate increase this May of about two percent to pay for additional electric transmission infrastructure to modernize California’s power grid and deliver more renewable energy to customers.

“We know our customers care more than ever about their energy bills during these difficult economic times, so we continue to focus on keeping rate increases as modest as possible while raising enough revenue to continue improving our safety and reliability,” said Tom Bottorff, Senior Vice President of Regulatory Affairs for PG&E. “These revenues help us serve customers by reducing the frequency of electrical outages, improving the responsiveness of our call centers, providing more convenient services and, above all, continuing to upgrade the safety of our gas and electric operations. Although electric and gas rates fluctuate from year to year, our average customer bills remain well below the national average.”

Bottorff added, “We try to empower all of our customers with tools to help them better understand and manage their energy needs so they can control their bills and make the best use of our services.”

SmartMeter-enabled online tools like MyEnergy, money-saving programs like Winter Gas Savings, rebates for energy-efficient appliances and home retrofits, and bill payment options make it easier than ever for customers the get more value for their money.

Pacific Gas and Electric Company, a subsidiary of PG&E Corporation (NYSE: PCG), is one of the largest combined natural gas and electric utilities in the United States. Based in San Francisco, with 20,000 employees, the company delivers some of the nation’s cleanest energy to 15 million people in Northern and Central California. For more information, visit http://www.pge.com/about/newsroom/.

RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC BILLS

     Customer Usage January 2012         January 2013       Change
     ————– ————         ————       ——
         550 kWh                  $89.31             $91.60        $2.29
         ——-                  ——             ——        —–
         850 kWh                 $184.23            $188.05        $3.82
         ——-                 ——-            ——-        —–
        1,200 kWh                $301.54            $307.13        $5.59
        ———                ——-            ——-        —–
JANUARY RESIDENTIAL GAS BILLS @72 therms

     January 2012       January 2013       Change
     ————       ————       ——
                 $82.37             $77.47        -$4.90
                 ——             ——        ——

SOURCE  Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E)

Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E)

CONTACT: PG&E External Communications, +1-415-973-5930

Web Site: http://www.pge.com

Here’s Why MUNI Basing Its Fares on Your Income Will Never Be “Cost Neutral” – Expansionist SFMTA – Through With the Two-Step

Monday, December 3rd, 2012

Here’s the news:

“Reiskin said he’d like to develop a fare system that cuts down on the red tape and provides discounts for those who need them, and full-fare rates for those who don’t. Reiskin said the program ideally would be cost-neutral, with prosperous older riders paying increased fares and lower-income adults paying less.”

Now of course MUNI wants more money money money all the time time time.

So of course, you could concoct a scheme that would be cost-neutral, at first, anyway.

But that wouldn’t be the point of the exercise.

The point of the exercise would be to raise revenue for MUNI by subsequently raising fares for the average rider.

So, step one is to change the fare structure to make step two viable.

Step two is to raise fares.

I see what you’re doing there, MUNI.

Well, myself, I’m through with the two-step.

Yet another car on Market Street* delaying MUNI:

Click to expand

*The only way the driver of the white wagon could have been at fault in this collision was if she had raced passed the orange streetcar by illegally driving the wrong way on the wrong side of Market. 

 

San Francisco Supervisor Scott Wiener’s Thoughts on Increasing Taxicab Medallions in San Francisco are Utterly Laughable

Tuesday, February 7th, 2012

Uh…

The idea of adding cabs to city streets has long been opposed by many taxi drivers, who say competition is already fierce enough for a job that has never offered a lucrative payday. Wiener said the hearings can address those concerns. He wants to convince drivers that more cabs will increase their earnings, since passengers will be more willing to call on taxis if they believe service is reliable.”

The idea that increasing the number of medallions would increase the earnings of existing drivers* is utterly laughable.

The lazy sit-around-all-day cabdrivers** of San Francisco:

Ergo, one is forced to assume that Supervisor Wiener isn’t talking to the drivers, oh no. He is actually addressing the people who would otherwise feel sorry for the drivers.

It’s unfathomable that he would actually believe what he’s talking about, so that means he’s lying. (It’d be like Hitler telling the Cossacks how great Operation Barbarossa is going to work out for them.)

Just saying.

*It’s not impossible to observe a network effect or something like that in some systems (like when a Starbucks moves in next door to your existing coffee shop, for example), but it _is_ impossible for an increase in medallions, by itself, to increase the earnings of existing San Francisco cabbies.  

**The other place to look for lazy cabdrivers is at SFO – hundreds of them lazing about smoking cigarettes and playing card games and complaining about how little money they’re making.*** Most hacks in SF aren’t lazy like that. Most hacks drive around looking for fares and, for that reason, end up making more money. 

***Back in the day, there was a hotel sitting on SFO property so driving there from Terminal 3 would take one minute literally. It was a three dollar fare. The airport would allow the returning driver to cut to the front of the line in this situation, but that generally would not make up for the loss of the driver waiting more than an hour for a one-minute ride. Faced with this situation, some of the drivers would pop the trunk, take out your bags and drive off in a huff. Truth. 

The Streets of San Francisco: SFMTA Rips Off Famous MUNI Critic Greg Dewar and His N Judah Chronicles

Friday, July 1st, 2011

This bus ad doesn’t say The Streets of San Francisco, oh no, it says The Treats of San Francisco.

See? (The fine print in the ad says that MUNI has permission from CBS to run to use the SoSF logo, so everything’s nice and legal.)

Click to expand.

Isn’t this ad kind of a rip-off of Greg Dewar’s N Judah Chronicles?

Signs point to yes.

Speaking of whom, here’s MUNI’s Death Spiral from Greg Dewar and Joe Eskenazi. (Boy, the head of MUNI at the time just flipped out, I mean, really flipped out over this bit in the SF Weekly from last year. He hosted a big meeting in response to this one article. It was epic, I’ve been told.)

Anyway, do you know what that “treat” is, the one referenced in the MUNI ad?

It’s the price increase what starts today.

Hurray!

Beginning July 1, Golden Gate Bridge “Carpoolers” Will Need to Stop for Inspection

Monday, June 28th, 2010

Remember back in the day, back when you could pose a couple mannequiner in your ride to avoid paying the toll on the Golden Gate Bridge? Well, those days are over as of July 1, 2010. Why? Why not, Our Bridge needs money to pay for ferries and buses and whatnot. That’s why a $3 carpool toll is coming.

So instead of paying nothing, you’ll have $3 deducted from your Fastrak. What’s that, you don’t have the Fastrak? Well then you’re going to have to pay full price, whether you have three or more souls en tu coche or not. Fastrak, vill be (achtung, baby!) mandatory for carpoolers.

What’s that, at least you’ll be able to zip through the tollbooths with your new Fastrak? Guess again. You’re going to have to stop for a carpool inpsection so the toll-taker can count noses and do a manequin check to boot.  That means that Resusci Annie isn’t going to cut it no mo.

These things are being used everywhere:

It was nice while it lasted but now it’s gone.

What kind of improved industrial light and magic animatronics will the George Lucas boys have to ccreate to continue beating the system when they come into the Presidio from points north every weekday morning?

The World Wonders.

“Effective Thursday, July 1, 2010, the Carpool Toll on the Golden Gate Bridge will be $3. To receive the carpool toll rate of $3, carpools MUST do the following:

  • Have a FasTrak account in good standing and a valid FasTrak tag. The FasTrak tag must be mounted in the vehicle per instructions.
  • Stop at a staffed lane so that the toll collector may validate the vehicle as a carpool.
  • NOT use a FasTrak ONLY toll lane (you will be assessed the full $5 FasTrak toll if you use a FasTrak ONLY toll lane).

What MTC is Calling Congestion Pricing on the Bay Bridge Isn’t, Actually

Monday, June 28th, 2010

Obviously, the Metropolitan Transportation Commission can charge whatever it wants on our broke-down San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, but raising the toll at 5:00 AM every weekday morning when the bridge isn’t congested at all is not what can fairly be called congestion pricing.

Call it something else, MTC. Call it a toll increase, if you want. Whatever you call it, it’s not an implementation of congestion pricing.  

Mssrs. Matier and Ross are highlighting this issue today

“Bay Bridge drivers are going to be forking over an extra $2 during the morning “peak” commute hours of 5 to 10 a.m. starting Thursday – even though the Metropolitan Transportation Commission, which made the call, has stats showing the actual peak is from 6:30 to 8:30 a.m.”

Economist Bill Vickrey, the “Father of Congestion Pricing,” must be rolling over in his grave over there in New York.

What good does it do to send a signal to drivers that it’s better for society if they drive over the bridge at 4:50 AM vs. 5:10 AM? It does no good at all.

 

The latest missive explaining tings from the Ministry of Truth, after the jump.

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CultureBus II? Market Street Railway Says No to MUNI’s $5 F-Line Fare Proposal

Tuesday, January 19th, 2010

Market Street Railway President President Rick Laubscher has some thoughts this morning about MUNI‘s proposal to raise the cash fare for the F-Market historic streetcar line.

Will the F-Line turn into another fiasco like we just had with the $7 CultureBus 74X? And how will MUNI leader Nat Ford manage to get by making an annual salary that’s merely $308,000 more per year than our Governor’s?

We should get some answers today at City Hall. Stay tuned. 

Here are Rick’s Eight Points:

1. The F-line is a core Muni service and should be treated as such.
2. Muni should collect the fares it’s already charging.
3. The F-line is cost-effective at its current fares.
4. Staff’s revenue assumptions from the fare increase are dubious
5. Different fares at the same Muni stops will slow down operations.
6. “Let ‘em buy a Fast Pass” is not an acceptable response.
7. Exceptionally high fares on the F-line hurt the city’s economic vitality.
8. Muni wants to penalize a line that “people want.”
 
And here’s Rick missive to MUNI riders:

$5 for an F-line Ride? An Open Letter to Nat Ford January 19, 2010 by Rick Laubscher, Market Street Railway
 
On behalf of Market Street Railway, I have sent the email excerpted below to SFMTA Executive Director/CEO Nathaniel P. Ford, Sr.  All are welcome to borrow and elaborate on any of these arguments in your own communications with decision-makers on this matter.

Remember, the SFMTA Board gives initial considerations to its staff’s 2010 budget recommendations, including the proposal to raise F-line fares from $2 to $5, Tuesday, January 19 at 2 p.m., Room 400, City Hall. 

You can reach Mr. Ford at 415-701-4720 or by email here. You can register your opinion with the SFMTA Board members by emailing this address. You can also reach Mayor Newsom at 415-554-6141 or by email here. Your opinion counts.

Read the whole thing, after the jump. 
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Now You Have Another Chance to Ask for a Bay Area Bridge Toll Increase: Dec. 7th, 2009

Monday, November 16th, 2009

Ah, the Powers That Be. They don’t just raise rates on you all of a sudden, oh no. They have meetings first, to tell you how “needed” and ”necessary” their proposed “adjustments” are. Then, when the rates go up, they’ll tell you all about the meetings on that very topic that you neglected to attend.

As here, where the Bay Area Toll Authority (BATA) will send its youngest and cutest staffers straight into San Francisco to hand out papers and pencils for you, the Public, to scribble your appreciation. Or criticism, whatever.

Maybe “Bay Bridge Mike” will be at the meeting on Pearl Harbor Day, 2009. We Can Only Hope:Our broken bridge, more broked than ever, but let’s have fun with it, cause, you know, we’re super-competent at our jobs.

090509JH003-copy

Oh well.

Paying more to cross our mismanaged bridges – well that’s not a burden, it’s an “OPPORTUNITY.” (Paging George Lakoff…)

“OPPORTUNITIES

Bridge Toll Hike Proposed for Earthquake Safety

Attend a hearing regarding a possible toll increase on the seven state-owned Bay Area toll bridges on November 17, December 3, or December 7, 2009. Can’t attend? Take our online survey!

As promised, the deets – BATA bing, BATA boom!:

Bay Area Toll Authority Schedules San Francisco Hearing on Proposed Toll Hike

Web Survey Also Available for Online Comments

The Bay Area Toll Authority (BATA) has added a fourth public hearing to receive public testimony on options for a proposed toll increase on the seven state-owned Bay Area toll bridges.

The newly scheduled public hearing will be held at 6:30 p.m. on Monday, Dec. 7, in San Franciscoat the downtown campus of San Francisco State University, 835 Market Street, Room 609. Additional public hearings are scheduled at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 17, in the City Council Chambers of San Mateo City Hall, 330 West 20th Avenue, San Mateo, and at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, Dec. 3, in the Wisteria Room of the Concord Senior Center (located in John F. Baldwin Park), 2727 Parkside Circle, Concord. All three public hearings will feature a short open house (from 6:30 to 7 p.m.) and a staff presentation (beginning at 7 p.m.) prior to taking public testimony. The first public hearing took place on Nov. 4 in Oakland.

Bay Area residents who are unable to attend one of the public hearings can make their views known via an online survey at: www.mtc.ca.gov/get_involved. The survey will be available through Dec. 21.

The toll increase, if approved, likely would take effect July 1, 2010. It is needed to raise an additional $160 million in annual revenues, chiefly to finance the estimated $750 million cost of necessaryseismic retrofit projects on the Antioch and Dumbarton bridges. Other factors include a slow but steady decline in toll-paying traffic on the state-owned bridges during each of the past five years, increasing operational expenses, and rising debt (due in part to the upheaval in the municipal bonds markets over the past two years). The proposed toll increase would be in effect on the Antioch, Benicia-Martinez, Carquinez, Dumbarton, Richmond-San Rafael, San Mateo-Hayward and San Francisco-Oakland Bay bridges. (The toll proposal does not affect the Golden Gate Bridge, which is owned and operated by an independent authority.)

The toll options under consideration would all raise the needed $160 million annually. Ideas on the table, detailed below, include raising the base toll on automobiles and motorcycles by $1 (to $5), and in so doing raise the first $100 million of new annual revenues. The remaining funds would be generated by a combination of increasing the per-axle toll for trucks and/or introducing a toll for carpools, which would be collected electronically via FasTrak® toll tags. Also under consideration is the introduction of peak-hour congestion pricing on the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge. Preliminary analysis shows that such pricing could reduce morning peak delay on the Bay Bridge by 15 to 30 percent.

 –  $5 toll for two-axle vehicles (autos and motorcycles); $3 for carpools
     during peak periods (Monday through Friday); and $6 per each
     additional axle for trucks. Carpools would be charged for the seismic
     retrofit portion of toll charges and would be required to obtain a
     FasTrak® toll tag to qualify for the reduced rate; FasTrak® equipment
     would be required in all carpool lanes.
 –  $5 toll for two-axle vehicles (autos and motorcycles) and $10 per each
     additional axle. There would be no charge for carpools during peak
     periods (Monday through Friday).
 –  Congestion pricing would be introduced on the Bay Bridge; charges
     would be $6 for two-axle vehicles during peak periods (Monday through
     Friday) and $4 for autos and motorcycles during off-peak hours (Monday
     through Friday), with a $5 charge for two-axle vehicles on weekends. A
     $6 charge for each additional axle, at all times and on all days,
     would be in effect with this option, along with a $3 charge for
     carpools during peak periods (Monday through Friday).

Written comments on the proposed toll increase will be accepted until 4 p.m., Dec. 21, 2009; they may be submitted to the BATA Public Information office at 101 Eighth Street, Oakland, CA, 94607-4700, faxed to BATA at 510.817.5848, or sent via e-mail to tolls@mtc.ca.gov. After receipt and review of public comments, the BATA Oversight Committee will consider the adoption of a revised toll schedule in early 2010.

BATA, which is directed by the same policy board as the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC), administers tolls on the region’s seven state-owned bridges. State legislation in 1997 authorized BATA to administer the base $1 toll on the Bay Area state-owned toll bridges.

BATA’s responsibilities were expanded by August 2005 legislation to include administration of all toll revenue and joint oversight of the toll bridge construction program with Caltrans and the California Transportation Commission. MTC is the transportation planning, financing and coordinating agency for the nine-county San Francisco Bay Area.

See you there!*

*Maybe not.