Posts Tagged ‘inner’

Let’s Knife: Standing in a Parking Space on Geary to “Reserve It” for Friends Driving Around Blocks Away is Unhealthy

Friday, October 9th, 2015

Why? Because somebody just might cut you, you know, in a knife fight that you just might get involved with in the 94118, despite the fact (or, especially because?) you yourself don’t ever carry a knife:

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Or, in other words, you can’t really save a parking spot by standing in it because it’s agin the law.

All right, enough controversy, Let’s Knife!

Selling the Richmond District, Alliteratively! – “Enjoy Our Parks & Piroshki & Biking & Bagels & Beaches & Burgers…”

Friday, September 11th, 2015

Here you go:

An Invest in Neighborhoods grant was awarded to Richmond District YMCA and Geary Merchants Association to install banners along the corridor.”

I don’t know, perhaps I didn’t come across all of these banners, but this version of our Richmond District seems like sunny Santa Monica with a schmear of Caucasian emigres thrown in:

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What is SFGov funding here, a nostalgia trip for the Wizened & White, the Millionaires & Merchants of Geary Blvd?

Could be…

These banners remind me of this effort in North Beach back in The Aughts

I mean, are we talking about the Richmond District of 2015, or of 1915?

(And “burgers,” what? I can think of exactly one burger place in the Richmond District what has more than 3.5 Yelp stars and it is in no way a destination restaurant.)

Tell me, Gentle Reader, what have I missed?

I’ll leave you with this, a neutral snapshot of the Richmond IRL, a perspective NOT funded by SFGov:

The Richmond District is a neighborhood in the northwest corner of San Francisco, California, developed initially in the late 19th century. It is sandwiched between Presidio of San Francisco (north) and Golden Gate Park (south). It is sometimes confused with Richmond, a city 20 miles (32 km) north of San Francisco. With the Pacific Ocean on its west, the Richmond is known for its foggy weather and colder climate due to the wind chills blowing from the ocean. It is also home to a vast affluent Chinese population and its commercial strips on Geary Blvd. and Clement Street are commonly referred to as the second Chinatown and boasts more highly rated Chinese restaurants than Chinatown itself. The Richmond also has deep Irish and Russian roots and has many Catholic and Orthodox churches.”

So, San Francisco Simply Can’t Afford Traffic Signals on Geary, Where They’re OBVIOUSLY Needed?

Thursday, September 10th, 2015

Man, this is not how I’d cross wide, wide Geary, I’ll tell you:

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The driver of the car heading inbound in the fast lane didn’t see these peds, so a passenger held out his arm as a way of apologizing, oh well.

The way to cross Geary would be to wait for reds at adjacent intersections OR to cross where there is a signal.

That’s what I’ve learned as a walker on the mean Streets of San Francisco.

Instead of going on a massive signal installing campaign, SFGov would rather promise you Pie In The Sky, a promise to repeal the laws of physics and human nature by the year 2024, you know, by the time that all the pols what voted for said Pie In The Sky have termed out, conveniently.

VisionZero they call it.

Explaining How This Cyclist Got a California Stop Ticket at 6th & Cabrillo While I’ve Gotten Zero Tickets in 25 Years

Wednesday, September 9th, 2015

This is the scene from two days back, southbound 6th Ave betwixt Cabrillo and Balboa.

I’m assuming the bike rider got a ticket, ‘specially since he seemed to be ignoring the cop even after siren whooped once, and then again.

And here’s the thing – Bro slowed way down for the stop sign, on a pretty big slope, he showed respect for the stop sign, about as much as the typical car driver would have. Even so, the Richmond Station cop on the dirt bike pulled him over anyway. See?

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I myself, heading north, back to The City, didn’t have a chance to come to a complete stop before I heard the whoop-whoop noise, but I certainly did after.

Anyway, here’s the thing – the cyclist either didn’t see the cop coming west on Cabrillo OR the cyclist ignored the cop ’cause he didn’t think he’d get pulled over.

If I were the cyclist coming downhill, I DEFINITELY would have seen the cop and I certainly would have come to a complete stop once I saw the cop.

Gentle Reader, how many people living today have more time on a bike in SF County the past quarter-century than I? Precious few, I’ll tell you. Junior the Bike Messenger, certainly, and most of your career-level SF messengers, and some of the “founders” of Critical Mass still living in town, certainly. And, due to a couple somewhat-SFMTA/MUNI-related mishaps, this has been a bad year. However, I’m still in the 99th percentile, and I’ll tell you:

You gotta show respect for the po-po, unless you want to spend hundreds and thousands on tickets over your lifetime on a bike in Frisco.

Is this two-faced? I suppose. But what do you want me to do? I California stop on bikes, and in cars. It depends on the circumstances. And one of the big circumstances is if a cop is right there looking at you. Of course one should be looking around all the time anyway, for other bikes, for cars, trucks, peds, everything

Admittedly, bikes were (seemingly) invisible to the SFPD back in the 80’s and 90’s, so I had a bit of an advantage over the riders of today. But my biggest advantage is paying attention – that’s the key.


Anyway, that’s why I have more miles and fewer citations than the average…

Old People, They’re Just Like Us! – Taking the 21 Hayes to a Safeway in the Inner Richmond Near Golden Gate Park – In 1938

Friday, June 19th, 2015

Here it is, a crop from your Western Neighborhoods Project, the OutsideLands.Org

“21 Hayes line streetcar on Fulton Street at 5th Avenue, with Safeway grocery in 1938.
Courtesy of Jack Tillmany link to this image…

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Of course, the Safeway is now a Lifestyle Store, and it’s moved a few blocks out, and the 21 Hayes is a bus line now, and the 21H doesn’t make it all the way out to 6th Avenue no mo, but even so, this is pretty close, IMO.

Hipsters Spotted _West_ of Masonic on Clement

Tuesday, April 21st, 2015

This is eastern Clement, but still:

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One thing is for certain: there is no stopping them; the hipsters will soon be here. And I for one welcome our new “effortless cool” overlords. I’d like to remind them that as a trusted blogging personality, I can be helpful in rounding up others to toil in their underground Etsy caves.

Clement Street on a Clement Day: Home of the Inner Richmond Pocket Farmer’s Market – Sunday Sunday Sundays

Friday, March 6th, 2015

It’s a little small, huh, on a dreaded sunny day, of Winter 2015.

But the people who like it like it, certainly.

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Agricultural Institute of Marin is partnering with the Clement Street Merchants Association to bring the Inner Richmond San Francisco’s newest farmers market! Join us every Sunday from 9am to 2pm, on Clement Street between 2nd and 4th Avenues, year-round…”

If San Francisco Had a City-County Border, This Would Be It

Wednesday, March 4th, 2015

Starting from the southeast, take Army/Cesar Chavez to Clipper and around Twin Peaks and up 7th Avenue and then jink over to like 11th Avenue (whatever it takes to get the dry rub chicken places of the Inner Sunset inside the City Limits – they seem pretty lively at night) and then up through GGP and the Richmond District up to the Presidio, where there’s a nice jag at 7th Avenue and then back east along West Pacific at the border and then up north along the Lyon Street Steps and then around Palace Drive all the way to the Bay and then you capture the waterfront all the way down to just north of Warm Water Cove:

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Oh, Divisadero doesn’t mean division, BTW.

Advice for Newcomers: Here’s Why the Rent’s Cheaper Out in the West Side, Out in The Avenues, in The Sunset and The Richmond

Tuesday, February 3rd, 2015

So I don’t get this bit about The Avenues, this little ditty that’s all about informing supposed “misinformed newcomers,” ’cause it’s coming from the greatest Misinformed San Francisco Newcomer of all: Gannett Co. Inc’s The Bold Italic, a blog about the SF Bay Area and, oddly, Los Angeles too, a little bit.

I’ll tell you, I know all about the Richmond and Sunset Districts. I’ve actually lived out there, believe it or not, during part of my quarter-century in the City and County (but mostly the City) of SF. And, I’ll tell you, these quite similar areas have their good points, but also they have their bad points.

And one, just one, of these bad points is the Avenues are cut off from the rest of the city, owing to geography. And this fact isn’t helped by our famously-horrible transit system (which might at some point get better, like a BART subway to La Playa or something) but also our poorly-designed network of roads (which is congested already, by design, and is only going to get slower, by design). Things are so bad out there that bike riders are tempted use streetcar-only tunnels to get back to the City Proper.

And then there’s the fog issue, which isn’t going away no matter what. Some people living out there claim it doesn’t really exist. But it does, I knows it.

And then there’s the concomitant ironic naming issue. Let’s start with The SUNset District. Cover your eyes, avert your gaze, West Bay residents:

“If you start at the Bay Bridge and head west along most major streets in San Francisco, you’ll eventually get to a magical land of misery known as the Sunset. The name is a joke, and perhaps even a way to trick tourists: The sun rarely visits the Sunset, not even when it sets. The primary weather element in the Sunset is fog—thick, endless, depressive clouds of it that wash up from the ocean to completely saturate the land. I lived in the Sunset for a single, terrible year. Before I moved there, I used to be one of those snobby city-dwellers who’d look down on suburbanites who couldn’t handle San Francisco’s famously capricious climate. I’d heard the Sunset’s weather wasn’t great, but hey, how bad could it be?

It was bad. Too bad for me; after our lease was up, my wife and I moved to the suburbs. Looking back, what bothered me most wasn’t the terrible climate—though I did hate it—but the vast difference between the Sunset’s weather and the weather everywhere else. Whatever meteorological patterns applied in normal parts of San Francisco didn’t seem to apply to the Sunset, which meant that forecasts for the city held no sway there. If the weatherman said it was going to be 80 and sunny, it was probably 55 and cloudy at my house.

And now, let’s move on to The Richmond District:

“Did the sand dunes in the northwest corner of the city look like Richmond, Australia? One story for the naming of the district is that early settler George Turner Marsh thought so, and named the area around his home such. (Other sources credit a neighborhood booster named George Fletcher for suggesting the name.)”

I’ll tell you, the average daytime temperature in Richmond, Victoria [not the other Richmond in NSW, which is prolly even hotter], Australia these days is 84 degrees freaking Fahrenheit – isn’t it ironic, dontcha think?

So, transportation and climate are just two reasons why rents are lower Out There in The Outer Lands, in the Great Sand Waste, you know, in comparison with the City Proper.

I could go on and on, and, as a matter of fact, I have, and it pisses some people off. Sorry. I just don’t understand why certain people are so defensive about where they live.

So enjoy your pride, Avenues People…


…but please don’t mislead those “misinformed newcomers,” as you call them.

Especially if you yourself is a well-financed but struggling start-up blog hailing from a Fortune 500 company out of Northern Virginia…

Introducing Loop, the 24 Hour Convenience Store at 19th and Lincoln What Looks Like an Audi Dealership

Tuesday, January 27th, 2015

All the deets, via Hoodline.

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When they were building this thing last year, I thought it was going to be a tall apartment building…