Posts Tagged ‘institute’

UCSF Architecture Update: One of These Things is Not Like the Other – Spot the “CIRM Worm”

Thursday, June 12th, 2014

Click to expand

All the deets.

Uh Oh, Now There’s ANOTHER Lawsuit Against the City: Small Property Owners vs. the “Nonconforming Unit Ordinance”

Wednesday, January 29th, 2014

Man, San Francisco sure seems to be getting sued a lot by property owners a lot these days.

Get used to it, 2014′s going to be a bumpy ride.

To wit:

“January 29, 2014 

SMALL PROPERTY OWNERS OF SAN FRANCISCO FILE LAWSUIT TO BLOCK LAW

New Ordinance Would Discriminate Against Families Who Move Into Their Own Buildings 

SAN FRANCISCO, Tuesday, January 28, 2014 – Today, the Small Property Owners of San Francisco Institute filed a lawsuit challenging Supervisor John Avalos’ Nonconforming Unit Ordinance on the grounds that the ordinance violates state law and fails to comply with the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA).

The Nonconforming Unit Ordinance would legalize the practice of renovating and expanding “nonconforming units.” Nonconforming units are “grandfathered” residential units that exceed local zoning laws’ density limits. Controversially, the ordinance would also discriminate against nonconforming units that have been the subject of lawful “no-fault” evictions, which are allowed under state and local law. Such units would be denied building permits for up to 10 years following a lawful eviction – even for regular maintenance and minor repairs. Property owners would also be barred from rebuilding their units after a fire or earthquake.

“This legislation punishes families who move into their own buildings,” stated Noni Richen, president of the Small Property Owners of San Francisco Institute (SPOSFI). “It could cause thousands of lawful housing units to sit vacant while the City denies permits for basic upkeep. Given the current housing shortage, this is unconscionable.”

“As we have shown again and again, we will not allow the City to violate property rights with these illegal schemes,” stated Andrew M. Zacks, SPOSFI’s attorney. “The state’s Ellis Act prohibits this kind of discrimination against lawful evictions. Moreover, cities are required to evaluate a new ordinance’s environmental impacts under CEQA. This legislation was rushed through without proper review.”

Nonconforming units are different from “in-law” units, which are generally unpermitted and illegal. For example, a permitted third unit on a parcel zoned for two units is considered a nonconforming unit. The City Planning Department’s Information and Analysis Group estimates that approximately 52,000 units in the city are nonconforming, comprising some 14% of the city’s housing stock.

A copy of the Nonconforming Unit Ordinance is available at http://zulpc.com/small-property-owners-file-suit-to-block-discriminatory-law/.

The Small Property Owners of San Francisco Institute (“SPOSFI”) is a California nonprofit corporation. SPOSFI advocates for the Small Property Owners of San Francisco, a nonprofit organization that works to promote and preserve home ownership in San Francisco. Its focus is to protect the rights of small property owners and foster opportunities for first-time home buyers. SPOSFI members range from young families to the elderly on fixed incomes, and its membership cuts across all racial, ethnic, and socio-economic strata. Its members include San Francisco residents who own nonconforming residential units in San Francisco.

Zacks & Freedman, P.C. is a law firm dedicated to advocating for the rights of property owners. With experience and knowledge in rent control issues, zoning, permitting, transactional disputes and other real estate matters, Zacks & Freedman, P.C. has successfully advocated its clients’ positions before local administrative tribunals and at all levels of the State and Federal courts.

It’s the “CIRM Worm” in Situ – San Francisco’s Craziest Building is at UCSF – Hanging Off of Mount Sutro

Friday, January 24th, 2014

See it on the right?

Click to expand

All the deets.

Our Crazy New CIRM-Worm Building Seems to be Fitting In Nicely up at UCSF Parnassus

Tuesday, June 7th, 2011

See it on the right up there?

Click to expand

Well, not really.

But read all about the craziest new building in California after the jump.

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Finally: Some Good Photos of the Ray and Dagmar Dolby Regeneration Medicine CIRM WORM Building at UCSF

Thursday, April 14th, 2011

Now I took some shots of the Ray and Dagmar Dolby Regeneration Medicine CIRM WORM Building at UCSF over Turkey Day weekend last year as I was coming down the hill, but, at long last, let’s see some good photos from Rafael Viñoly Architects.

Right here.

That’s what it looks like.

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For the record….

UCSF’s CIRM Worm Building Officially Opens Today – Read All About it from Critic John King

Wednesday, February 9th, 2011

You know what I think? I think that it’s easier to teach a newspaper writer how to take photos than it is to teach a newspaper photographer how to write. So if you had to choose and you could only afford to send one person, you’d give a camera and send the writer, right?

That’s something to think about when you look at John King’s bits at SFGate. He does a fine job with photography on his own. Maybe even better?

Just saying.

Here’s a retread from last year. I think the new Mayor will be on the scene today to kick things off.

What’s the Next Big Thing in stem cell research? It’s got to be UCSF‘s shiny, brand-spanking-new, 700-foot-long Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regeneration Medicine and Stem Cell Research (CIRMbuilding from New Yawk-based Rafael Vinoly Architects.

Check it:

“The $123 million building is a series of split-level floors with terraced grass roofs and solar orientation. Open labs flow into each other, with office/interaction areas located on the circulation route between the labs, allowing for the entire research community in the building to interact.”

It’s the CIRM Worm! See?

Click to expand

It was the Modern Steel Construction Magazine cover girl earlier this year, or something, so that’s something to crow about.

As planned:

But this low-rise monster, in real life, somehow looks like:

An RV;

A boat;

A millipede; and

A Jawa Sandcrawler

And all at the same time.

Researchers have already moved in so let’s take a look why not.

Here’s the view coming up Medical Center Drive. This thing looks as if it will spring to life at any moment and start marching towards Parnassus, or Irving, to swallow a an N Judah or two:

This is how you build in Earthquake Country:

This is all the way up the hill where Med Center takes a hairpin. Kind of looks like an RV. Anterior Region in Lateral View:

Looking down the hill:

The clitellum:

And here, it sort of looks like a boat. See how it’s moored to Mount Sutro? (And hey, UCSF. Did you leave all the lights on for the entire four-day Thanksgiving weekend? O.K. fine.)

And here’s the gap betwixt floors:

Look through and you can see the ocean! (Or the bay, or the Golden Gate, or the estuary, whatever…)

Here’s the view from the roof, more or less, with a nice view of The Richmond and our Golden Gate Bridge

And here’s what we were promised, up on the roof:

And here’s what we got, it’s like weeds and International Orange chairs:

Maybe they’re still working on the vegetation.

And speaking of orange chairs, the theme continues inside:

Now, don’t fret about them concomitant radioactive materials up near the top…

…cause they have a nice outdoor shower to wash ‘em all away, Silkwood-style:

Leave us now depart the CIRM Worm:

Bon Courage, CIRM people!

They had a big party for the groundbreaking with Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger a couple years back, so maybe they’ll have another shindig for the official kickoff?

Read all about it or take a look at the video from back in the day.

2008 saw Arnold’s first visit ever to UCSF, so Chancellor J. Michael Bishop gave him the business about it.

The stars of the show were Arnie and Mr. Eli Broad

Was that a gold fleur-de-lys ring? Something like that.

Anyway, y’all come back.

All the deets:

The building, which will be located on the Parnassus Campus, will house 25 principal investigators and their teams at full capacity. It will be the headquarters of the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regeneration Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCSF, which will continue to include scientists across all UCSF campuses. The relocation of scientists into the building will free up space in existing laboratories/offices that will allow for additional recruitments. UCSF has recruited 16 new faculty members to the Center in the last three years. The building will be located near UCSF Medical Center, which will support the long-term goal of translating basic research findings to clinical trials.

Groundbreaking for the building, which has more than 46,000 assignable square feet and has four split-level floors, occurred in late August 2008, with completion of the project in late-2010.”

Design-Build Team:
General Contractor
DPR Construction, Inc., San Francisco
Fabricator and Erector
Schuff Steel – Pacific Division, Oakland/San Diego, Calif. (AISC Member)
Architect
SmithGroup, San Francisco
Structural Engineer
Forell/Elsesser Engineers, Inc., San Francisco
Preliminary Design Team:
Architect
Rafael Viñoly Architects, New York
Structural Engineer
Nabih Youssef Associates, San Francisco

UCSF’s Stem Cell Center is Open – It’s the Craziest Building in Town – A 700-Foot Millipede Coming Down Mt. Sutro

Monday, November 29th, 2010

What’s the Next Big Thing in stem cell research? It’s got to be UCSF‘s shiny, brand-spanking-new, 700-foot-long Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regeneration Medicine and Stem Cell Research (CIRMbuilding from New Yawk-based Rafael Vinoly Architects.

Check it:

“The $123 million building is a series of split-level floors with terraced grass roofs and solar orientation. Open labs flow into each other, with office/interaction areas located on the circulation route between the labs, allowing for the entire research community in the building to interact.”

It’s the CIRM Worm! See?

Click to expand

It was the Modern Steel Construction Magazine cover girl earlier this year, or something, so that’s something to crow about.

As planned:

But this low-rise monster, in real life, somehow looks like:

An RV;

A boat;

A millipede; and

A Jawa Sandcrawler

And all at the same time.

Researchers have already moved in so let’s take a look why not.

Here’s the view coming up Medical Center Drive. This thing looks as if it will spring to life at any moment and start marching towards Parnassus, or Irving, to swallow a an N Judah or two:

This is how you build in Earthquake Country:

This is all the way up the hill where Med Center takes a hairpin. Kind of looks like an RV. Anterior Region in Lateral View:

Looking down the hill:

The clitellum:

And here, it sort of looks like a boat. See how it’s moored to Mount Sutro? (And hey, UCSF. Did you leave all the lights on for the entire four-day Thanksgiving weekend? O.K. fine.)

And here’s the gap betwixt floors:

Look through and you can see the ocean! (Or the bay, or the Golden Gate, or the estuary, whatever…)

Here’s the view from the roof, more or less, with a nice view of The Richmond and our Golden Gate Bridge

And here’s what we were promised, up on the roof:

And here’s what we got, it’s like weeds and International Orange chairs:

Maybe they’re still working on the vegetation.

And speaking of orange chairs, the theme continues inside:

Now, don’t fret about them concomitant radioactive materials up near the top…

…cause they have a nice outdoor shower to wash ‘em all away, Silkwood-style:

Leave us now depart the CIRM Worm:

Bon Courage, CIRM people!

They had a big party for the groundbreaking with Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger a couple years back, so maybe they’ll have another shindig for the official kickoff?

Read all about it or take a look at the video from back in the day.

2008 saw Arnold’s first visit ever to UCSF, so Chancellor J. Michael Bishop gave him the business about it.

The stars of the show were Arnie and Mr. Eli Broad

Was that a gold fleur-de-lys ring? Something like that.

Anyway, y’all come back.

All the deets:

The building, which will be located on the Parnassus Campus, will house 25 principal investigators and their teams at full capacity. It will be the headquarters of the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regeneration Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCSF, which will continue to include scientists across all UCSF campuses. The relocation of scientists into the building will free up space in existing laboratories/offices that will allow for additional recruitments. UCSF has recruited 16 new faculty members to the Center in the last three years. The building will be located near UCSF Medical Center, which will support the long-term goal of translating basic research findings to clinical trials.

Groundbreaking for the building, which has more than 46,000 assignable square feet and has four split-level floors, occurred in late August 2008, with completion of the project in late-2010.”

Design-Build Team:
General Contractor
DPR Construction, Inc., San Francisco
Fabricator and Erector
Schuff Steel – Pacific Division, Oakland/San Diego, Calif. (AISC Member)
Architect
SmithGroup, San Francisco
Structural Engineer
Forell/Elsesser Engineers, Inc., San Francisco
Preliminary Design Team:
Architect
Rafael Viñoly Architects, New York
Structural Engineer
Nabih Youssef Associates, San Francisco

The California Academy of Sciences Announces Extended Summer Hours

Wednesday, July 29th, 2009

Our CalAcademy has just announced extended hours!

So, until September 3, 2009, the California Academy of Sciences in Golden Gate Park will be open until 8:00 PM on Mondays and Tuesdays. Check all the deets below.

Are the animules friendlier during the evening? It sure seems that way:

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THE CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES ANNOUNCES EXTENDED SUMMER HOURS FROM AUGUST 3-SEPTEMBER 8, 2009

Museum to stay open until 8:00 pm every Monday and Tuesday night.

Summer nights in San Francisco just got steamier. Visitors to the California Academy of Sciences can now enjoy the four-story rainforest exhibit, the swampy alligator habitat, the mangrove lagoon, and the rest of the museum’s exhibits and shows until 8:00 pm every Monday and Tuesday from August 3 through September 8, 2009.

San Francisco residents and tourists alike can take advantage of the long summer days to visit the Academy during off-peak times for Golden Gate Park—and to catch some of the aquarium’s nocturnal animals at their most active. “We have been delighted by the strong interest that San Francisco residents and visitors have shown in the new Academy since we opened last September,” said Dr. Greg Farrington, executive director of the Academy. “These extended summer hours will help ensure that everyone who wants to visit with our penguins and zoom through our digital Universe is able to do so.”

Dr. F welcomes you:

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“Throughout the extended summer hours program, all of the Academy’s exhibits will remain open until 8:00 pm on Monday and Tuesday nights, and the planetarium and 3D theater will offer additional shows. The Academy Cafe will also remain open, giving working parents the opportunity to bring their kids to the Academy for “dinner and a museum” as a special weeknight treat.

Regular admission fees will apply for the Academy’s extended summer hours; Academy members will be admitted free of charge. Unlike the Academy’s weekly Thursday night program, NightLife, during which adults ages 21 and over can enjoy the museum from 6:00 – 10:00 pm, the Academy’s extended summer hours on Monday and Tuesday nights will be available for all ages. Tickets can be purchased at the door or in advance online at www.calacademy.org/tickets. As always, visitors who take public transportation receive a $3 discount.

On Monday, August 3, evening visitors can also choose to attend an astronomy lecture by Margaret Race from the SETI Institute. Hosted inside the Academy’s 90-foot diameter planetarium dome, the lecture will begin at 7:30 pm. During the talk, Race will describe how experts from many different disciplines contribute to searches for extraterrestrial life—and explain how the Outer Space Treaty and planetary protection policies urge “responsible exploration” when visiting other planets. Lecture tickets cost $10, and advanced purchase is recommended. Tickets can be purchased online or by calling 800-794-7576.

 The California Academy of Sciences is home to Steinhart Aquarium, Morrison Planetarium, Kimball Natural History Museum, and world-class research and education programs—all under one living roof. The new Academy, designed by award-winning architect Renzo Piano, opened to the public on September 27. Admission to the Academy is: $24.95 for adults; $19.95 for youth ages 12 to 17, Seniors ages 65+ and students with valid ID; $14.95 for children ages seven to 11; and free for children ages six and younger. The Academy is free to the public on the third Wednesday of each month. Admission fees include all exhibits and shows. Hours are 9:30 am – 5:00 pm Monday – Saturday, and 11:00 am – 5:00 pm on Sunday. The Academy is closed on Thanksgiving and Christmas. www.calacademy.org. (415) 379-8000.

Arnold Schwarzenegger Graces UCSF at Ceremony for Stem Cell Institute

Thursday, December 18th, 2008

Well, yesterday was a great day for the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine and UCSF when the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundationgave away a big fat $25,000,000 check for stem cell research up at the Parnassus Campus.

Read all about it or take a look at the video.

This was Arnold’s first visit ever to UCSF, so Chancellor J. Michael Bishop gave him the business about it. Click to expand:

The stars of the show – Arnie and Mr. Eli Broad

Is that a gold fleur-de-lys ring? Something like that.

Jeff Sheehy, Director for Communications athe UCSF AIDS Research Institute, along with fellow CIRM Independent Citizens Oversight Committee Board Member David Serrano Sewell

Here’s the very steep site today …

and here’s what it will look like come 2010:

And they even had edible chocolate-dipped model stem cells. At the reception a Dr. Peter van Nostrum helpfully explained that the pink sprinkles represent the amino acid lysine:

Good luck, UCSF!

Details after the jump.

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