Posts Tagged ‘interview’

“Marissa Mayer in Conversation with Marc Benioff” at the Castro on October 30th – Via INFORUM, the Commonwealth Club’s “Innovation Lab”

Thursday, August 21st, 2014

I’m figuring Marc’s going to go all 60 Minutes on Marissa during his hard-hitting “interview” at the Castro Theatre, j/k.

More seriously, check out the “nosebleed” tickets for just $10.

Hey, both these people have had photo shoots at San Francisco Magazine. Benioff was so enamored, he’s using one of their photos as his g0-to headshot these days. Mayer was featured about six years ago – I remember ’cause I had one of my photos taking up two pages – I should dig up that issue sometime. Anyway, the title of the piece had the word “Googirl” in it and I was thinking, “That’s not cricket.” So they Googled the term and then decided to change the title. These days, they don’t deign to fix their mistakes (like talking about diesel powered Boeing jets) after publication. Oh well.

And now, on with the show:

Marissa Mayer in conversation with Marc Benioff – A Visionary Award Event

INFORUM is awarding Marissa Mayer, CEO of Yahoo!, our 21st Century Visionary Award. Marissa is only one of 25 women to run a Fortune 500 company, and No. 1 on Fortune Magazine’s “40 Under 40″ list. She began her career as the 20th employee at Google.

In 2012, Mayer claimed a bigger stage with her appointment as CEO of Yahoo! In two years, Mayer has launched Yahoo! Screen Live, acquired 17 companies including Tumblr, and spearheaded facelifts for the mail app, homepage, and Flickr. Her boldness has made her a household name.

Marissa will be interviewed by Marc Benioff, Chairman and CEO of salesforce.com. Google Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt will present the award to Marissa via a video introduction.

Join us for an evening with two giants revolutionizing the tech industry at The Castro Theatre.”

(more…)

Ashton Kutcher and that Horrible San Francisco-Based PopChips Company Make the 2012 Fineman PR Blunder List

Monday, December 17th, 2012

All the deets are right here, at FinemanPR.

And there’s a little background on this after the jump.

Ashton, you’re not funny – try something else.

Ashton, your entourage (and also all the Pop Chips people) were afraid to tell you that your skits were not even remotely entertaining. What else didn’t they / don’t they tell you?

Oh, and the reviews are in:

God, Popchips are awful. The flavors suck.”

Popchips SUCK! I can believe I let you weiners influence me into buying a bag of that collossal garbage.”

(more…)

Kicking That Horrible Zynga Company When It’s Down – Ouch – Maybe They Should Have Moved Away

Friday, August 3rd, 2012

Wow, the first two-thirds of this short video from Kixeye is pure comedy gold:

Read the news and turn the pages:

“Zynga also hit an all-time low Thursday, trading down as far as $2.68 before closing at $2.70, a daily drop of 3.9 percent. After a shake-up in the San Francisco company’s management ranks, it faces two more class-action lawsuits, on top of one already filed earlier this week.”

Does CA Really Need a “Social Media Privacy Act?” No Matter, SB 1349, the Job Interview Facebook Password Law, is Here

Friday, May 25th, 2012

Uhhhhhhhhhhh, I’m not going to articulate myself on this one.

But you, you go right ahead, feel free to tell your buds what you think. (But first, please email me your FB account names / passwords, and your intimate photos and whatnot.)

All right, off you go:

“California Senate Approves Social Media Privacy Act - Yee’s SB 1349 will prohibit employers, colleges from seeking Facebook, Twitter passwords

SACRAMENTO – On a bipartisan 28-5 vote, the California Senate today approved legislation authored by Senator Leland Yee (D-San Francisco/San Mateo) to stop employers from formally requesting or demanding employees or job applicants provide their social media usernames and passwords.

Yee’s bill also prohibits public and private colleges and universities from requiring such information of students.

The bill comes after a growing number of businesses, public agencies, and colleges around the country are asking job seekers, workers, and students for their Facebook and Twitter account information.

“I am pleased by today’s overwhelming vote to end this unacceptable invasion of personal privacy,” said Yee. “The practice of employers or colleges demanding social media passwords is entirely unnecessary and completely unrelated to someone’s performance or abilities.”

In addition to the privacy of students and workers, accessing social media accounts may also invade the privacy of family members and friends who thought they only were sharing information with their own social media network.

“These social media outlets are often for the purpose of individuals to share private information – including age, marital status, religion, sexual orientation and personal photos – with their closest friends and family,” said Yee. “This information is illegal for employers and colleges to use in making employment and admission decisions and has absolutely no bearing on a person’s ability to do their job or be successful in the classroom.”

“SB 1349 is a significant step towards securing Californians’ constitutional right to privacy, both online and offline, in the workplace and in school,” said Jon Fox, Consumer Advocate for CALPIRG.

“If employers are permitted to access the private information of job applicants, unscrupulous hiring managers will be given greater leeway to circumvent anti-discrimination laws,” said Joe Ridout of Consumer Action.

Rather than formally requesting passwords and usernames, some employers have demanded applicants and employees to sit down with managers to review their social media content or fully print out their social media pages. SB 1349 will also prohibit this practice.

Shannon Minter, Legal Director for National Center for Lesbian Rights, said that the practice of requesting social media passwords is the equivalent to reading a personal diary, and also LGBT employees, job applicants, and students already face significant obstacles when applying for schools and jobs.

Minter said that SB 1349 helps ensures individuals are “judged by their qualifications and performance, rather than elements of their private life.”

IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law professor Lori Andrews, who specializes in Internet privacy, told the Associated Press that these practices even when given voluntarily should not be allowed.

“Volunteering is coercion if you need a job,” Andrews told the AP.

Johnny Veloz, an unemployed photographer, told KCRA Sacramento that he was asked for his Facebook password during a recent job interview. Veloz was denied the job after refusing to provide the information.

“For me, that’s rude and it’s not respectful,” Veloz told KCRA. “Someone has privacy and you expect them to respect that.”

Yee’s bill would also prohibit employers and colleges from demanding personal email addresses and login information of employees, applicants, and students.

SB 1349 will now be considered by the State Assembly before heading to the Governor.”

And oh, if I ever crafted a “social media privacy act,” I can just about guarantee you that Facebook WOULD NOT LIKE IT. Not one bit.

Just saying.

UC Davis School of Law Professor Emeritus Cruz Reynoso to Chair Task Force on OccupyDavis Pepper Spray Incident

Monday, November 28th, 2011

Well here’s the news of the day:

“Former state Supreme Court Justice and UC Davis School of Law Professor Emeritus Cruz Reynoso is the first member of task force that will review report about UC Davis pepper spraying from ex-L.A. police chief William Bratton.”

I, for one, am prepared to allow our UC some breathing room on this one. Let’s give them a little while and then see what they come up with, on both this incident and the prior UC Berkeley baton incident, m’kay?

Click to expand

“Cruz Reynoso chairs task force on pepper spray incident
Date: 2011-11-28
University of California President Mark G. Yudof announced today (Nov. 28) the appointment of former California Supreme Court Justice Cruz Reynoso to chair the task force formed to address the pepper spraying of UC Davis students.Reynoso, a UC Davis law professor emeritus who was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2000, will be “absolutely fair,” Yudof said.The task force is part of UC’s efforts to address policing issues in the wake of the Nov. 18 pepper spraying of UC Davis students and other incidents involving law enforcement officers and protesters. Acting in response to a written request from UC Davis Chancellor Linda P.B. Katehi, Yudof last Tuesday announced that former Los Angeles police chief William J. Bratton would lead an independent fact-finding of the pepper spray incident and report back the results to him within 30 days.Bratton, who also led the New York City police department, now heads the New York-based Kroll consulting company as chairman. He is a renowned expert in progressive community policing. Assembly Speaker John A. Perez also had made a request to Yudof and UC Regents Chair Sherry Lansing for an independent investigation.Under the plan, Bratton’s report also will be presented to the task force that Yudof is forming, again at Katehi’s request. The task force will consist of a cross-section of students, faculty, staff and other UC community members. Reynoso is the first member named to the task force. The task force will review the report and make recommendations to Katehi on steps that should be taken to ensure the safety of peaceful protesters on campus. She will present her implementation plan to Yudof.

Reynoso, a farmworker’s son, rose from an Orange County barrio to become the first Latino to serve on the California Supreme Court. He has a bachelor’s degree from Pomona College and a law degree from UC Berkeley. His distinguished career includes serving as director of the California Rural Legal Assistance Foundation, a UCLA law school professor and as vice chair of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. He joined the UC Davis law school faculty in 2001 as the inaugural holder of its Boochever and Bird Chair for the Study and Teaching of Freedom and Equality.

In remarks at the regents meeting today, Yudof reiterated his support for protecting the right to peaceful protests on campus and emphasized that Bratton’s investigation will be independent.

Last Tuesday, in a separate effort, Yudof also appointed UC General Counsel Charles Robinson and UC Berkeley School of Law Dean Christopher Edley Jr. to lead a systemwide examination of police protocols and policies as they apply to protests at all 10 UC campuses. The review is expected to result in recommended best practices for policing protests across the 10 UC campuses.

For more information about how UC is addressing policing and protest issues, visit www.universityofcalifornia.edu/news/article/26713.”

University of California President Mark Yudof Throws Down: New System-Wide Examination of Police Protocols

Wednesday, November 23rd, 2011

Well, first there was this:

And then there was this:

Via Louise Macabitas – click to expand

So. now there’s this:

President Yudof launches initiatives to address policing and protests

 University of California President Mark G. Yudof moved on two fronts today (Tuesday, Nov. 22) to address policing issues in the wake of the pepper spraying of UC Davis students and other incidents involving law enforcement officers and protesters.

Acting in response to a written request from UC Davis Chancellor Linda P.B. Katehi, Yudof agreed to conduct a thorough review of the events of Nov. 18 on the Davis campus.

As a first step, Yudof reached out to former Los Angeles police chief William J. Bratton to undertake an independent fact-finding of the pepper spray incident and report back the results to him within 30 days.

Bratton, who also led the New York City police department, now heads the New York-based Kroll consulting company as chairman. He also is a renowned expert in progressive community policing.

“My intent,” Yudof said, “is to provide the Chancellor and the entire University of California community with an independent, unvarnished report about what happened at Davis.”

Assembly Speaker John A. Perez also had made a request to President Yudof and UC Regents Chair Sherry Lansing for an independent investigation.

Under the plan, Bratton’s report also will be presented to an advisory panel that Yudof is forming, again at Katehi’s request. The panel will consist of a cross-section of students, faculty, staff and other UC community members.

The advisory panel, whose members will be announced at a later date, will review the report and make recommendations to Chancellor Katehi on steps that should be taken to ensure the safety of peaceful protesters on campus. She will present her implementation plan to President Yudof.

On a second track, Yudof appointed UC General Counsel Charles Robinson and UC Berkeley School of Law Dean Christopher Edley Jr. to lead a system-wide examination of police protocols and policies as they apply to protests at all 10 UC campuses.

This effort will include visits to campuses for discussions with students, faculty and staff, and consultation with an array of experts.

The review is expected to result in recommended best practices for policing protests across the 10 UC campuses.

“With these actions,” Yudof said, “we are moving forward to identify what needs to be done to ensure the safety of students and others who engage in non-violent protests on UC campuses. The right to peaceful protest on all of our campuses must be protected.”

OMG, Pepper Spray: UC Davis Chancellor Linda Katehi will be on KQED-FM’s “Forum with Michael Krasny” on November 21, 2011

Monday, November 21st, 2011

[UPDATE: Via Ian Hill, KQED News:

"We had a technical issue updating Forum last night - Pat Buchanan will not be our guest at 10am. The guests will be: 

Linda Katehi, Chancellor, University of California, Davis
Nathan Brown, Assistant Professor Organization: Department of English - University of California, Davis. And member of the Davis Faculty Association, which on Saturday called for the resignation of Chancellor Katehi over the pepper spray incident.
Fatima Sbeih, Senior at UC Davis - She was among those demonstrators pepper-sprayed"]

All right, listen in and ask questions during today’s big show at 88.5 FM or online.

Lt. John Pike doing his thing, the thing that appalled UC President Mark Yudof:

Via Louise Macabitas – click to expand

All right, tune in at 10:00 AM:

“The pepper-spraying of Occupy Wall Street protesters at the University of California, Davis by a law enforcement officer on Friday has drawn criticism outrage from around the world. At 10am pst KQED’s popular call-in show, Forum, will discuss the incident with UC Davis Chancellor Linda Katehi, who has been the target of student protests following the pepper-spraying and has been asked to resign by the university’s faculty association.

“Mon, Nov 21, 2011 — 10:00 AM

UC Davis Pepper Spray Incident

UC Davis announced today that it has placed university police chief Annette Spicuzza on leave after her officers used pepper spray to move seated Occupy UC Davis protesters on Friday. The incident, which has gained international media attention, also led the campus faculty association to call for the resignation of Chancellor Linda Katehi. She says she will not step down. We discuss the controversy.”

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen G. Breyer Graces U.C. Hastings – Another Interview From “Legally Speaking” Series

Thursday, November 17th, 2011

I’ll tell you, our UC Hastings Law School down in Civic Center has been en el fuego this past year or so, what with its new, new-school dean and whathaveyou.

For example, here’s yesterday’s joint, featuring United States Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer getting interviewd by UC Hastings Distinguished Professor David Faigman, an expert on constitutional theory:

Via James Block - click to expand

(And that comes on the heels of another Supreme Court Justice and the political debates they’ve had recently. It’s amazing, really.)

What were the topics? I have no idea. But Bob Egleko was there (with his pencil and notepad, since they don’t allow recordings), so check his report.

And I’ll be sure to upload video or link or whatever I can find in a week or two, pinky-swear.

“Legally Speaking: U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen G. Breyer
11/16/2011 from 2:30 PM to 4:00 PM
198 McAllister, Louis B Mayer Lounge

Legally Speaking is a series of probing interviews with prominent lawyers, judges and academics, co-produced by UC Hastings and California Lawyer.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen G. Breyer will join UC Hastings for a Legally Speaking interview. Justice Breyer is the third U.S. Supreme Court Justice to spend time at UC Hastings in the last 13 months. He will be interviewed by UC Hastings Distinguished Professor David Faigman, an expert on constitutional theory. Justice Breyer’s most recent book Making Our Democracy Work: A Judge’s View will be the topic of discussion.”

Dennis Herrera Throws Down: Takes on Poorly-Designed Central Subway and Its Cost Overruns – Watch Now

Wednesday, November 2nd, 2011

Via Jerold Chinn of SF Public Press comes this.

Check out Dennis Herrera‘s thoughts on the much-more-expensive-than-promised and shorter-than-promised Central Subway “spur*,” starting at 1:00:

And don’t miss the other part either.

*”Spur?” I love it. Oh yeah, that’s right. It doesn’t go as far north as it should, or as far south neither. And it’s too deep. Maybe it just doesn’t make sense, as things stand now, except as a political payoff.

Wow: Vogue Magazine on What Former First Lady Jennifer Siebel Newsom was Doing Four Years Ago, Back in 2007

Thursday, October 13th, 2011

Here’s the latest from Vogue (which of course has nothing, nothing at all to do with anything even possibly connected with “overt sexualization,” oh no).

Leave us remember 2007:

“Four years ago, when Jennifer Siebel Newsom, a onetime businesswoman and actress, decided she wanted to have a baby with her husband, Gavin Newsom, former mayor of San Francisco,* she looked at the world into which she would be bringing a daughter and saw a bleak picture. Around her, a tabloid culture in which women were prized for cattiness and overt sexualization was thriving, and in the political realm, things didn’t look much better.”

All right, but ’round about the same time, I seem to recall somebody going on about how “the woman is the culprit” and that same somebody calling writer and fellow “girl” Heather Maddan a liar.

Photo: Girls Club Entertainment

OK fine.

Thanks for your insights, Vogue!

* And current Lt. Governor, don’t forget.