Posts Tagged ‘jay xu’

Heh: Asian Art Museum “Loses” Terracotta Warrior – “2,112 Years Old, About 5’ 5” Tall, Mud-Colored, and Doesn’t Speak English”

Thursday, January 24th, 2013

Heh:

“The Asian Art Museum needs your help. One of our terracotta warriors is lost, and we have to find him before China’s Terracotta Warriors: The First Emperor’s Legacy opens on February 22. What we know is this: a small group of terracotta warriors journeyed from their home in China to the museum—but somewhere along the way, this one took a wrong turn and is now missing. He’s 2,112 years old, about 5’ 5” tall, mud-colored, and doesn’t speak English.”

“If you spot him, please post a photo on Twitter, Instagram, or our Facebook wall and tag it with #LOSTWARRIOR so we can track his whereabouts on this map. Even if you don’t have photos, share and tag your tips and leads with #LOSTWARRIOR. Every little bit counts.
REWARD: Those who help may be eligible to win passes to the exhibition. Please spread the word, and thanks! Here’s our director Jay Xu with a personal call to action.

Heh.

Your Asian Art Museum: Free “Phantoms” This Sunday! Korean Culture Day Sept 23! Origami Graffiti!

Friday, August 31st, 2012

OMG, your world-class Asian Art Museum is busy busy busy these days.

First up is the origami paper-crane pop-up graffiti bombing of the McAllister wall.

Get all the deets from the Uptown Almanac, the San Francisco Chronicle and KGO-ABC.

Here’s how it’s holding up, last night…

…and the day before:

It’s persevering, huh?

Next up is the closing of the Big Show, check it:

Phantoms of Asia: Contemporary Awakens the Past

CLOSING THIS SUNDAY

Just as this exhibition has touched upon the fleeting nature of life, it too must come to an end. An expansive exploration of spirituality, cosmic order, and the afterlife, it’s a provocative presentation of both contemporary art and older objects from our collection. The result is a one-of-a-kind journey transcending time and place. Phantoms will go out with a bang: everyone can see it for FREE this Sunday, as part of our Target First Free Sunday.”

I’d recommend showing up early or late on Sept 2, 2012.  Feel free to practice your Gangnam Style while waiting in line. Speaking of which, don’t forget about:

Korean Culture Day 2012

Sunday, September 23
11 am–4 pm
Museum-wide 

Free admission”

All the deets on that after the jump.

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Welcome Back, Terracotta: China’s Famous Terracotta Warriors Coming Back to Our Asian Art Museum February 22, 2013

Thursday, August 16th, 2012

They’re ba-aaack!

Armored General, Qin dynasty 221-206 BCE, Height 203 cm, weight 250 kg. Excavated from Pit 1, Qin Shihuang tomb complex, 1980. Reproduced with kind permission from the Qin Shihuang Terracotta Warriors and Horses Museum. Serial number 002747.

All the deets:

“CHINA’S TERRACOTTA WARRIORS:THE FIRST EMPEROR’S LEGACY - Asian Art Museum kicks off 10th anniversary in Civic Center with epic exhibition

SAN FRANCISCO, August 15, 2012—The Asian Art Museum kicks off its 10th anniversary in San Francisco’s Civic Center with an exhibition from one of the greatest archaeological discoveries in modern time. China’s Terracotta Warriors: The First Emperor’s Legacy will be on view February 22 – May 27, 2013.

The exhibition features 120 rare objects from the great tomb complex of China’s First Emperor (259-210 BCE), including 10 life-size terracotta figures—the maximum number of figures permitted outside China in a single exhibition.

Captivating the world since its discovery in 1974, the First Emperor’s tomb complex is one of the largest burial sites ever constructed. Estimated at nearly 250,000 square feet—or more than four American football fields—it includes a scale replica of the emperor’s imperial palace, complete with stables, offices, an armory and even a zoo. Ancient historians also described “flowing rivers” of mercury, of which trace amounts have recently been confirmed by scientists.

Perhaps most impressive are the estimated 8,000 terracotta figures excavated to date, including warriors of all ranks (all individually constructed, no two faces are alike), acrobats, musicians and horses. The tomb complex took 700,000 laborers nearly 40 years to build.

In 1994, the museum, then located in Golden Gate Park, was among the first to present the terracotta warriors to a U.S. audience. The 2013 exhibition offers a new generation of visitors the rare chance to view the clay figures up close. Visitors will also discover new secrets from the tomb, with more information than ever before on the First Emperor, his reign, and his quest for immortality.

“Celebrating 10 years in our Civic Center home calls for something extraordinary,” said Jay Xu, executive director, Asian Art Museum. “In China, history is being unearthed. Bringing a chapter of this epic story to San Francisco—with 10 life-size sculptures from one of the most significant discoveries of our time—is a great way to commemorate this occasion.”

EXHIBITION TICKETS: $8-$22
Advance tickets go on sale October 16, 2012
More info: www.asianart.org/terracotta-warriors

Brace Yourselves: “Bali: Art, Ritual, Performance” is Coming to Our Asian Art Museum – Runs Feb. 25 to Sept 2011

Friday, February 18th, 2011

Bali: Art, Ritual, Performance is the Big Show of the Year at our Asian Art Museum. It will run from February 25th to September 11th, 2011.

And here’s the Matcha schedule for 2011:

THURSDAYS - 2011: February 24, April 21, May 12, June 30, August 18 5-9 pm | $10 Admission

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“Bali has long held a special place in the Western imagination, not only for its reputation as a tropical paradise, but for its artistic culture. Here, art, performance, and ritual are a part of the everyday.

While Bali is widely appreciated as a vibrant center of visual and performing arts, there has never been an in-depth exploration of its artistic traditions in the United States until now. Bali: Art, Ritual, Performance brings the art and artists of this special Indonesian island to San Francisco so that you can experience firsthand its culture, beliefs, and practices. See not only artworks but explore the context in which they were made and used, as the museum comes alive with the kinds of music and performance that fill Balinese ritual life.

The 131 artworks on view—many borrowed from international collections and never before seen in the U.S.—range from simple, yet deftly woven images of the rice goddess to elaborately carved and gilded chairs. There will be puppetry, gamelan performances, masked dances, and more to provide a museum experience as unique and mesmerizing as Bali itself. The Asian Art Museum is the exclusive venue for this exhibition.

Read more about the exhibition.

See you there!

And you can read some stuff about debt, if you want, after the jump

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Giant Buddha of Civic Center Not So Tough After All – Loses a Head and a Couple of Its Arms

Thursday, February 17th, 2011

Seeing how it was built makes me feel it has less power now, like it has less control over me. In my daily nightmares it usually has a solid core of molybdenum or that Terminator II kind of metal. And sometimes, on a few nights, the good ones, it’s creamy nougat.

Mmmmmm, nougat.

But, as you can see, it’s mostly just air in there, it’s not solid at all:

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You Maniacs! You blew it up! Ah, bless you! God bless you all to Heaven!

And Steve Rhodes has the video of an arm disassembly. (Not so tough now, are you, Buddha?)

Word From the Asian Art Museum in Civic Center: “We Will Keep Our Doors Open and Maintain Operations”

Friday, November 19th, 2010

Well, I guess there’ll be no bailout from local billionaire and Asian Art Nut Larry Ellison anytime soon, but, no matter, it will carry on despite recent financial issues.

Now, for some reason, San Francisco went all out this year for the City of Shanghai and its World Expo. So, the AAA deserves credit for that when the City considers related matters in the future. (I mean, your World Expos, your America’s Cups, your Olympics, they mostly lose money right? They’re mostly a bad thing for the hosting cities and regions but mostly a good think for the politicians who make the deals and “win” the right to host whatever. Of course, I’m generally skeptical of those who want to take The People’s land, money, opportunities, whatever to pay for some extended party for the greater glory of a few electeds. Anyway…)

A nice ambiance just off Larkin Street, non?

Here’s the news:

“Asian Art Museum Open for Business

SAN FRANCISCO, November 18, 2010- San Francisco’s Asian Art Museum will keep its doors open and maintain operations despite financial challenges faced by the Asian Art Museum’s Foundation, which is the private fundraising arm of the Museum.

“The Museum is fortunate to have the support of donors from around the world. Donations from individuals, the Museum’s board, and our corporate and Foundation partners remain strong” said Jay Xu, director of the Asian Art Museum. “I want to assure the Museum’s visitors, our 17,000 members, and all of our donors and hundreds of volunteers that the Museum will continue to be a leading center for Asian learning in the future.”

While the City solely owns the Museum’s building and its collections, the City and the Foundation jointly fund the Museum’s staff, facilities, and operations.

The Museum continues to maintain its role as a vital source of Asian art and culture, averaging nearly 300,000 visitors per year. Like many other cultural organizations in California and across the United States, the Foundation is facing challenges stemming from the economic downturn and related market disruptions. The Foundation is attempting to renegotiate its debt financing with its principal creditors.  As a measure of prudent management of fiscal responsibility, the Foundation has engaged outside professionals, and, with City officials, has begun to work on these negotiations.

“While this has been a difficult situation, it will have no impact on the Museum’s core operations,” said Tony Sun, chair of the Asian Art Commission and Asian Art Museum Foundation, the Museum’s dual governing boards.

The Museum looks forward to welcoming visitors to its current critically acclaimed exhibition, Beyond Golden Clouds; Five Centuries of Japanese Screens, on view through January 16, 2011, as well as the upcoming major exhibitions Bali: Art, Ritual, Performance, on view February 25 through September 11, 2011, and Maharaja: The Splendor of India’s Royal Courts, on view Oct 21, 2011, through April 8, 2012.

About the Asian Art Museum
The Asian Art Museum is a public institution whose mission is to lead a diverse global audience in discovering the unique material, aesthetic, and intellectual achievements of Asian art and culture. Holding more than 17,000 Asian art treasures spanning 6,000 years of history, the Museum is one of the largest museums in the Western world devoted exclusively to Asian art.

Information: (415) 581-3500
or www.asianart.org
Location: 200 Larkin Street, San Francisco, CA 94102″

Ten-Foot Tall Cyclone Fence Keeps the Great Buddha of Civic Center Safe from Giants Fans and Vandalizers

Wednesday, November 3rd, 2010

Thank Gaia that Rec and Park is keeping our Giant Buddha safe from the madding crowd today:

See the fence? It should come down by tomorrow, November 4th, after the crowd has left:

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UPDATE: Oh no, blogged too soon! Appears as if some fans managed to get a better vantage point, at the risk of enraging Gaia, the Earth Goddess:

See Comments.

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Our Graffitoed Giant Buddha in Civic Center Got All Cleaned Up Yesterday

Friday, June 25th, 2010

Remember back earlier this month when people promoting Kodak’s version of a Flip camera thought it was all viral to vandalise the giant 15-ton Buddha down in Civic Center? Well, the sculpture is all cleaned up now. Let’s take a look.

Here’s a screen grab from the now-censored Kodak viral marketing video. (You can still see the shorter, censored 4:13 version here.) 

Click to expand.

No attempt was made to clean things up for a while so here’s the way it looked when I was taking some girl to the Costco on Wednesday:

See? (There was other graffiti elsewhere of course.)

Well, check it, it’s all cleaned up now. They must have done this Thursday A.M. As it looks today:

Sacrilege never looked so good.

I’m calling this an A-one clean-up job.

Censored Viral Video for Kodak Play Sport Camera Shows Giant Buddha Graffiti Culprit

Thursday, June 17th, 2010

I haven’t seen the “Jesus is the Onegraffito on our giant Shanghai Buddha down in Civic Center, but I did manage to catch some tagging and stickering.

See?

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Now yesterday, Jackson West pointed out that a stickerer of the Buddha was “caught on tape” (so to speak) on one of a series of videos being used to promote Kodak’s new Flip-like digital video camera, the rugged, waterproof Play Sport Zx3. But then, somebody edited the vid, so now you can’t see the culprit on the video.

Oh, wait a sec, how about this? Here is one of the scenes that was visible yesterday but not today.  So, who are “those are the dipshits who would tag the big buddha statue?” Here’s the answer from my video cache (so to speak) of the Uptown Almanac:

 

Sadly, it appears that one of the scenes featuring this green-screen gentleman got cut. (Really, it’s an awesome video all-around. Thanks Kodak Marketing Department!)

It seems our corporate overlords are always trying to think of new ways to get to us, huh? Oh well.

Will the giant Buddha-heads start crying due to all the abuse?

Only Time Will Tell.