Posts Tagged ‘jaywalker’

How We Live Now: Parked Cars at the Dreary Geary-Divisadero Hospital-Medical District

Friday, June 19th, 2015

As seen from Geary – look, it’s a parking lot game like what you can play on your iPhone

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A normal town would deal with this, but Frisco don’t, oh well. (If you’d like to make a go of putting back to use the very unused building at the northeast corner of Geary Divis, be my guest – a Honey Baked Ham sto’ was its last use, years and years ago.)

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(Hey, was this one of the HBH stores what OJ Simpson had an interest in before The Real Killer stabbed OJ’s ex-wife and the stud who drove the white Ferrari (license plate L84AD8) that OJ paid for? I know not.)

And oh, there was a fire station here? News to me. Leaving you with the still-cited case of Quinn v. Rosenfeld, 15 Cal.2d 486 (1940):

“The plaintiff had been employed for about seven years at a firehouse located in a residential district on the northerly side of Geary Street between Scott Street on the east and Divisadero Street on the west. About 6:35 P. M. on September 29, 1937, the plaintiff stepped from the northerly curb in front of the firehouse, with the intention of crossing the street at that point for the purpose of going to a store on the southeast corner of Geary and Divisadero Streets. There was no crosswalk at the point of crossing selected by the plaintiff. There were established crosswalks and stop signs at both intersections. A pole with a lighted street lamp stood about two feet east of the point where the plaintiff entered the street, and the doors of the lighted firehouse remained open. The plaintiff wore a dark blue uniform. He stopped behind a parked car which was to the west of him. There were no parked cars to the east for a distance of about 75 feet. He looked to the east and at a distance of 135 to 150 feet observed the lights of the defendant’s car in the traffic lane on the north side of the car tracks approaching at a speed of about 20 to 25 miles an hour. He proceeded safely as far as the northerly rail of the westbound car tracks and stopped again to permit another westbound automobile, which had passed the defendant’s car and which was moving at a high rate of speed, to pass in front of him. Before proceeding he observed the defendant’s car again, and saw that it was swerving onto the westbound car tracks and coming directly towards him. He stepped back but before he could clear the defendant’s path he was struck by the right front fender of the vehicle.”

The Horrible Pedestrians of San Francisco, Chapter CXII: Special Richmond District Edition – The Right Way and the Wrong Way to Jaywalk

Wednesday, June 17th, 2015

This person never looked. This person shouldn’t be jaywalking:

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But bygones, moving on, ever so slowly moving on…

…to this. Starting across Geary with a cane, waaaaaay too late:

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Assuming you start when it’s legal, then tout le monde need to wait for you. But if you start too late then you’re just another jaywalker.

I start late, sometimes. But I pay attention.

That’s the difference.

The Horrible Pedestrians of Masonic Avenue – See How They Run – A Darwin Award Loser

Monday, July 30th, 2012

Here’s how some people cross six lanes of Masonic at Ewing Terrace:

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Now, is this kind of thing legal? Well sure, if you’re walking – this could be one of those unmarked crosswalk deals.

But it’s not legal to cross here if you’re running. Sorry pedestrian.

(Our FUBARed beyond all reason SFMTA has a plan to put a traffic light in here whenever it can get its grand mal Masonic Street Design off the ground.)

Now a little further up the hill, we lost a ped who was similarly jaywalking earlier this year. I guess we could blame accidents like that the 30 MPH speed limit in front of Trader Joe’s, but that’s not how I’d look at it.

I’d look at it by trying to get inside the peds’ heads to try to think of a way to get them to not kill themselves.

Oh well.

Masonic Avenue Street Design Study

Engineering hearing on proposed changes, May 13, 2011

Masonic Street Redesign Study final report (PDF)

The survey results from the third community meeting, held on September 30, 2010, at San Francisco Day School (PDF), are available.

About the Project

The primary goal of the Masonic Avenue Street Design Study is to identify how Masonic Avenue between Geary Boulevard and Fell Street can safely and efficiently accommodate the needs of all roadway users, including but not limited to pedestrians, bicyclists, motorists and Muni. The project is funded by the San Francisco County Transportation Authority through the Prop K half-cent local transportation sales tax program.

Objectives:

1. Engage representatives of all constituencies within the community who would be impacted by changes to Masonic Avenue including, but not limited to, residents on Masonic Avenue, residents on side-streets, merchants, school representatives, bicyclists, Muni customers and pedestrians.

2. Improve transit operation.

3. Improve pedestrian and non-motorized access to transit.

4. Increase the safety of pedestrian crossings.

5. Increase motorist compliance with traffic rules and regulations.

6. Reduce the number of vehicular collisions, especially those involving pedestrians and bicyclists.

7. Support neighborhood vitality by creating a more inviting and accommodating public realm.

Community meeting presentations

The following presentations from the various community meetings are available from the San Francisco Planning Department website:

First community meeting presentation, June 15, 2010, Day School, PDF, 7MB
Second community meeting presentation, Aug. 10, 2010, Day School, PDF, 7MB
Third community meeting presentation, Sept. 30, 2010, Day School, PDF, 6MB

James Shahamiri
415.701.4732
james.shahamiri@sfmta.com