Posts Tagged ‘Johns Hopkins’

UCSF Medical School Continues to Kick Ass, Take Names – Ranks Highly in “America’s Best Graduate Schools” 2012

Wednesday, March 16th, 2011

All the deets, below.

The view from Parnassus, where building support columns are covered with tiny black-and-white shots of alum:

Click to expand

Bon courage, people of UCSF!

The deets, here and after the jump:

UCSF Ranks Among Best Medical, Nursing Schools in Survey

UCSF is ranked among the nation’s top four schools for medicine and nursing, according to a new survey conducted by U.S. News & World Report.

Results are published in the magazine’s 2012 edition of “America’s Best Graduate Schools,” which appeared online on March 15, 2011 at www.usnews.com and will be available on newsstands on April 5.

The survey ranks schools according to the quality of training in both research and primary care. UCSF has the only school of medicine in the nation that ranks in the top five in both categories — fourth in the United States for primary care and fifth nationally for research.

The report ranks the UCSF School of Nursing fourth overall and first nationwide in the nursing specialties of family nurse practitioner, psychiatric/mental health clinical nursing, and adult/medical surgical nursing. The university also received top ratings in many medical specialties and scientific sub-disciplines.

The rankings also include previous assessments of other types of schools, which U.S. News surveys, but not on an annual basis. In its most recent ranking, in 2008, UCSF School of Pharmacy was ranked number one. In its most recent ranking, in 2010, the UCSF graduate programs in the biological sciences tied for seventh place, with the specialties of immunology/infectious disease ranked second and neuroscience ranked third. The surveys do not rank dental schools.

“These rankings showcase the high quality of UCSF’s educational and research enterprise across the board,” said UCSF chancellor, Dr. Susan Desmond-Hellmann. “But moving beyond the numbers, they reflect the excellence and hard work of all the UCSF faculty and staff and the breadth of experience available to every student who comes here to study.”

According to the magazine, the overall medical school rankings are based on two types of data: surveys sent last fall to medical school deans and administrators, and statistical indicators provided by 126 medical schools fully accredited in 2010 by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education, as well as by the 20 schools of osteopathic medicine fully accredited by the American Osteopathic Association.

These data measured such factors as acceptance rates, faculty resources, and the number of graduates entering primary care. Research activity also was measured by funding from the National Institutes of Health.

Specialty rankings for medical schools were based on surveys of medical school deans and senior faculty. Rankings for nursing were based on surveys sent to deans, administrators, and faculty at programs in those fields.

(more…)

Another Nobel Prize for UC San Francisco – Dr. Elizabeth Blackburn Brings Home the Gold

Monday, October 5th, 2009

Here she is, America’s newest Nobel Prize winner: UCSF‘s Elizabeth H. Blackburn, Ph.D:

blackburn_color2_full copy

They’ll be partying hard today down at the Mission Bay campus. The celebration in Genentech Hall starts in just a few minutes and they’ll have a full-blown news conference this afternoon.

Wow! First Oprah and now this.  

Of course Elizabeth wouldn’t want to leave out her co-winners, so let’s give a shout out to Carol W. Greider of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Jack W. Szostak of Harvard Medical School.

blackburn_lab_full copy

It’s going to be on!

Congratulations to Elizabeth and everybody at the University of California, San Francisco

Fiat Lux, baby!

THE DISCOVERY OF THE TELOMERASE ENZYME

The scientists discovered an enzyme that plays a key role in normal cell function, as well as in cell aging and most cancers.  The enzyme is called telomerase and it produces tiny units of DNA that seal off the ends of chromosomes, which contain the body’s genes. These DNA units – named telomeres—protect the integrity of the genes and maintain chromosomal stability and accurate cell division.  They also determine the number of times a cell divides—and thus determine the lifespan of cells.

Telomerase is pronounced (tel-AH-mer-AZE). Telomere is pronounced (TEEL-oh-mere).

The research sparked a whole field of inquiry into the possibility that telomerase could be activated to treat such age-related diseases as blindness, cardiovascular disease and neurodegenerative diseases, and deactivated to treat cancer, in which the enzyme generally is overactive.

In recent years, Blackburn and colleagues have explored the possibility that life stress, the perception of life stress and lifestyle behaviors could take a toll on telomerase and telomeres. They have reported several studies with human participants, suggesting a correlation. The findings may offer insight, at the cellular level, into the impact of stress on early onset of age-related diseases.

The scientists were named to receive the prize “for the discovery of how chromosomes are protected by telomeres and the telomerase enzyme,” according to the Nobel committee in Stockholm, Sweden.

Evolution of discovery

Blackburn’s road to discovery traces back to 1975 to 1977, when she was a postdoctoral fellow at Yale University. There, working with Joseph Gall, she discovered the unusual nature of telomeres, with their simple, repeated DNA sequences comprising chromosome ends. The work was published in 1978.

With Szostak, she established that these DNA repeats stabilize chromosomes inside cells. They also predicted the existence of an enzyme that would add the sequences to the ends of chromosomes.

In 1985, while a professor at University of California, Berkeley, Blackburn and her then-graduate student Greider reported the discovery of such an enzyme, which they named telomerase. Their research showed that in some organisms, such as the single-celled pond dweller Tetrahymena, telomerase continuously replenishes the chromosome’s telomeric tips. In humans, however, researchers, including Blackburn and her group, showed that telomerase is damped down at certain times in the lives of many types of cells, limiting their ability to self-replenish.

With this discovery, scientists saw the possibility of exploring whether, in humans, the enzyme could be reactivated to prolong cell life to treat age-related diseases, and deactivated to interrupt cancers.

Blackburn joined the UCSF faculty in 1990 and is the Morris Herzstein Endowed Chair in Biology and Physiology in the Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.

She is the fourth UCSF scientist to win the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.
A native of Australia, Blackburn has lived in the United States since 1975, and is a naturalized citizen of the United States as of September 2003.

She lives in San Francisco with her husband, John Sedat, PhD, a professor of biochemistry and biophysics at UCSF. They have one son, Benjamin.

UCSF is a leading university dedicated to promoting health worldwide through advanced biomedical research, graduate-level education in the life sciences and health professions, and excellence in patient care.