Posts Tagged ‘june’

Our Long Parochial Nightmare is Over: The Vandalized Slides at Panhandle Playground 94117 have been Replaced by RPD

Monday, September 8th, 2014

Well the slides at the Panhandle Playground have been replaced after three months of absence.

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1. Perhaps the RPD spokesmodel meant that the entire slide complex was being repaired, as opposed to the $2000 plastic slide itself. I don’t think it would have made sense to repair the slide itself, due to liability issues for starters. This is a brand-new slide, one that’s similar enough to the original.

2. So some wealthy, non-profit people came by with clipboards to say that this particular playground currently earns a “D” grade? Well, OK fine, but if you talk to the people who actually use the place, they, more or less, give it an “A” grade, you know, except for the slide that wasn’t there all summer long. Mmmmm… What’s up with that?

3. Supervisor London Breed’s office was unresponsive to the email contact sent by a group of concerned parents, apparently. So she gets an “F,” or an Incomplete perhaps. (I’ve worked at two similar offices, with about ten or one hundred times as many constituents, and if the elected in charge found out about something like this then there’d be a 20-minute yell-fest and/or a passive aggressive note sent to a (lower-case “s”) supervisor to “fix this.”) So, obvs, a “communication issue” occurred, I just don’t know how common this is with her office.

4. RPD has a policy to not repair anything in a playground if it’s due to be revamped in the next two years? That’s my understanding. Does that mean that this playground won’t get revamped anytime soon? That’s my understanding. Why’s that? Read on, Gentle Reader.

5. What RPD really wants is area parents to get together to raise something on the order of [bites right pinkie finger] one million dollars, you know, the way they do things in rich areas of SF, like Sea Cliff (ala the new Mountain Lake) and Presidio Heights. Only then will RPD put your playground at the top of the fix-it list? OK fine. The funny thing is that most of the money that gets used to refurbish existing playgrounds is paid for by the non-rich, from some bond. But all this doesn’t matter for the playground at hand, because:

6. The slide vandalized in May 2014 has been replaced in September 2014 and the users are now satisfied. No $5,000,000 modernization from the RPD is needed, frankly. [Oh what’s that, RPD – this old-school playground costs you a lot of coin to maintain? Well, then why don’t you fix it up, RPD, you know, using the money we give you?]

And that’s the end of this story.

Vandalized Panhandle Playground Slide Crisis Enters Its Second Month – Won’t Somebody PLEASE Think of the Children?

Wednesday, June 25th, 2014

Amy Stephenson of Hoodline (fka uppercasing) has the deets on the The Case Of The Missing Panhandle Slides

Now here’s how the purple slides looked back in happier times, before The Attack of May 2014:

But then, sometime at the end of May, I’m guessing May 30th or May 31st, you know, the weekend, some vandal(s) (I’m guessing “young punks” or “hippies”) put a giant hole in the leftmost slide. Ouch!

So, first it was all like this…

…and then it was all like this – an even bigger hole:

But then on the following Monday (June 2nd), somebody from SFGov (DPW? RPD? SFPD?) came along and added some red DANGER tape:

And then soon after that, up went the plywood and then somebody came along and did a more permanent fix and so that’s how things look today, near the end of June.

Now I’m just assuming that the hole was the result of vandalism, but I don’t figure how else it could have happened.

(Can I blame SFGov for the hole? Nope. Not at all.)

(Can I find fault with how SFGov was/is handling the issue? Nope. Not at all.)

IMO, fixing these slides proper would be a big job, so simply getting another big old piece of plastic might be the best course of action. And that might take a while. I’m figuring a resolution by the end of July is reasonable – sorry kids.

In mitigation, the playground still has one working slide.

In the meantime, WON’T SOMEBODY PLEASE THINK OF THE CHILDREN?

OMG, MUNDY Plays the Inner Richmond June 21, 23. 2013 – MUNDY! MUNDY! MUNDY! MUNDY! MUNDY! MUNDY! MUNDY!

Monday, June 17th, 2013

An arresting ad from The Richmond:

Click to expand

San Francisco’s Most Anticipated Play of 2013: A.C.T.’s “Black Watch” – A Must-See – Runs Through June 16th

Friday, May 10th, 2013

This is it. This is your San Francisco Theatre Performance of the Year.

It’s Black Watch from Scotland.

It’s down in the Armory, in the Mission. If you show up late, they won’t let you in. 110 minutes, no intermission. And, oh yeah, all the tickets cost $100.

But everyone seems to love it. 

Get your tickets now if you want to go.

Look, it’s getting attention already:

Chad Jones of the San Francisco Chronicle

Karen D-Souza of the San Jose Mercury News

Georgia Rowe of the San Francisco Examiner

A shot from yesterday’s press preview at The Drill Court:

By  Brenden Mendoza – thanks!

All right, see you there!

Handy Guide: How to listen to Scootish People.

Here’s where it’s at:

The Armory Community Center
333 14th Street (between Mission and Valencia)
San Francisco, CA 94103

View a larger map and get directions

Use the Bay Area’s 511 TakeTransit Trip Planner to get public transit information.

For more information about public transportation and parking lot options please visit the Black Watch show page.

All the deets: 

National Theatre of Scotland’s Black Watch

May 9–June 16, 2013
A Revolutionary Theatrical Event

by Gregory Burke
Directed by John Tiffany

Performing in the Armory Community Center, located in San Francisco’s Mission District at 333 14th Street (between Mission and Valencia).

THERE WILL BE NO LATE SEATING!
Please plan appropriate travel time when making arrangements.

Running time:
1 hour and 50 minutes with no intermission

The internationally acclaimed hit—named “#1 Theatrical Event of the Year!”
by the New York Times
After transfixing audiences across the globe and receiving unanimous critical acclaim worldwide, National Theatre of Scotland’s revolutionary production of Black Watch makes its highly anticipated Bay Area premiere. Inspired by interviews with soldiers who served in Iraq with Scotland’s nearly 300-year-old Black Watch regiment, this hauntingly powerful depiction of war is so inventive and groundbreaking in scope that it demands a completely unique performance venue—and will take over the long-dormant Drill Court at San Francisco’s historic Mission Armory. Splicing together exquisitely deployed stagecraft, from choreographed marches and Scottish ballads to searing video news footage, Black Watch captures the layered state of being at war, from moment to gripping moment. A transformative theatrical event you don’t want to miss, Black Watch delivers a visceral, unforgettable experience.

Performances of Black Watch will take place in the Armory Community Center, located in San Francisco’s Mission District., located at 333 14th Street (between Mission and Valencia). Click here for directions.

“Thrilling . . . a necessary reminder of the transporting power that is unique to theater.” —The New York Times

“A genuine spectacle that revels in its own theatricality and comes replete with music, marching, explosive effects and its own piper.” —Chicago Tribune

“Magnificent” —New York Observer

“Enthralling” —Washington Post

“★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ! The world must see this play. Immediately.” —The Herald (Scotland)

“★ ★ ★ ★ ★! Fierce, passionate, and unguarded” —The Guardian

“A landmark event” —The Independent (London)

“A glorious piece of theater—raw, truthful, uncomfortable, moving, graceful and dynamic” —Scotland on Sunday

“Stirring and absorbing” —The West Australian

“A pulsating epic” —Daily Mail

Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco Flies Rainbow Flag for Gay Pride Month, 2012

Saturday, June 23rd, 2012

Like this:

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But there are no complaints, unlike the recent situation in Virginia at the Fed Bank there.

Burn: New UCLA Study Concludes California High Speed Rail Offers No Net Economic Benefits – “Simply Moving Jobs Around”

Friday, June 22nd, 2012

Well this one is hot off the presses of the UCLA Anderson Forecast:

California High-Speed Rail and Economic Lessons from Japan

Jerry Nickelsburg
Senior Economist
UCLA Anderson Forecast

Saurabh Ahluwalia
Anderson School of Management
UCLA

June 2012

Here’s the start and the end – you’ll have to click above to read the whole thing.

“California High Speed Rail (CHSRL) is once
again in the news as the governor and state legislature
take up the issuance of construction bonds approved
by the voter passage of Proposition 1A of 2008.
Under “project vision and scope” on the CHRSL Authority
website are listed three categories of benefits:
economic, environmental and community.

In this article we focus on the economic benefits.
Specifically we look at economic growth and,
by implication, job creation. That is to say, we are
examining the benefit side of the equation and leaving
the cost side to other analysis.

Though CHSR Authority has developed and vetted a forecasting
model and has commissioned a number of economic
impact studies, these rely on relatively strong, though
perhaps plausible, assumptions. As an alternative,
we examine an actual case of high speed rail, one that
has been widely deemed a success, for evidence of
the magnitude of benefits measured by induced GDP
growth that one can expect from the building and
operation of CHSR over the next 40 years.
Our study of the Japanese Shinkansen system
from 1964 to present fails to provide evidence of
induced aggregate growth.

Rather, the evidence suggests high-speed
rail simply moves jobs around the
geography without creating significant new
employment or economic activity. That is not to say that
CHSR is not justified by population growth, pollution
abatement, or other factors. However, the evidence
from Japan is relatively clear. As an engine of
economic growth in and of itself, CHSR will have only a
marginal impact at best.

Governor Brown claims CHSR to be a visionary
project along the lines of the U.S. Interstate Highway
System, The California Central Water Project, and
the Panama and Suez Canals. As with these projects,
Governor Brown claims HSR will result in job
creation, economic development, particularly in the
Central Valley, the accommodation of population
growth and a cleaner environment.
The California High Speed Rail Authority
(CHSRA) has a set of studies demonstrating a sufficient
benefit cost analysis, a business plan that claims
operating costs will be covered by setting prices at
the currently charged airline prices for travel between
Los Angeles and the Bay Area.

The principal economic benefits cited by the CHSR Authority are the
creation of 100,000 construction jobs for the duration
of the project, operation and maintenance jobs for
the running of the trains, and the creation of 450,000
jobs and faster economic growth as a benefit of the
existence of the rail lines.

But, critics of the business plan abound. The
Board of Supervisors from both Tulare and Kern
Counties, counties who would presumably benefit
from the increased connectivity and economic growth
potential of CHSR voted their opposition to the program
as “currently constituted.

Moreover, questions have been raised about construction costs and timing,
environmental impact, operating costs and ridership
forecasts.

The State Legislative Analyst’s Office,
while not taking a position on the desirability of
CHSR, has critiqued the decision making process and
the quality of information available for legislators to
properly evaluate the issue.

 

 

Conclusions
In this study we have looked for, and failed to
find evidence of economic development that could
be clearly identified with the introduction or
operation of high-speed rail in Japan. This is surprising
because, at least for the Tokaido Line, conditions
were ripe for economic development. To be sure the
prefectures along the Tokaido Line grew. The late
60s and early 70s were a period of transformation and
growth throughout Japan. But the data don’t admit a
clear story that high-speed rail was in and of itself a
differentiating contributor.

Is it possible that absent high-speed rail Kanagawa
Prefecture would have grown more slowly? That
is an experiment that can never be performed. But
when we keep in mind that Japan’s growth in the 60s
and 70s were due to exports of goods and Kanagawa’s
main city, Yokahama, is a major port city for the
Tokyo area, it is easy to conclude that the economic
growth would have occurred with existing low speed
rail and truck transport.

The lessons for California are two-fold.

First, high-speed rail tends to create sprawl as it lowers
the cost for commuters and makes more far-flung
locations possible bedroom communities. This may
be considered a benefit by some and a detriment by
others.

Second, the claims that a multiplier effect (or
economic development effect) of 450,000 jobs as a
result of the introduction and operation of CHSR are
not likely to be realized. There may be good reasons
to invest in CHSR including the possibility that
CHSR is the optimal infrastructure investment for a
growing population; but the economic argument, the
jobs argument, does not seem to stand on very solid
ground.

OMG, It’s Your Summer of NightLife! Thursdays at the Academy of Sciences – Pride, Gallery Crawl, Soundwave, More!

Tuesday, June 19th, 2012

As they say:

NightLife events in July 2012 at the California Academy of Sciencesevery Thursday night is different.”

Which one will you attend next?

Deets below.

Put a little swaggr into your Thorsdagr why not? Thusly:

Click to boogie

California Academy of Sciences

Remember, I love the Nightlife…

See you there!

June 21
Pride NightLife
Kick off your celebration of SF Pride weekend at NightLife. In the Piazza, Heklina of Trannyshack will host a fabulous drag performance and “tranimal” costume contest. Carol Queen & Robert Lawrence, co-founders of the Center for Sex and Culture, will give a talk titled “Seven Billion Sexual Orientations” about supporting sexual individuality and diversity. In the planetarium, don’t miss “Stargayzing” at 6:30—a look at the mythology behind some of your favorite constellations—followed by two showings of Earthquake. Plus, hear tales of sex-changing fish and other fascinating animals from an aquarium biologist, and enjoy activities and information from organizations like Hard French SF, Rainbow World Fund, Gay & Lesbian Sierrans, and AIDS Memorial Grove. Entertainment in the east pavilion by San Francisco icon Juanita More and the Stay Gold DJs. Additional music by Hard French DJs Carnita & Brown Amy in the coral reef.

June 28
Gallery Crawl NightLife
For one night only, the Academy will transform into a pop-up art museum, featuring guest curators who will each take over a portion of the space with hand-picked collections that reflect their take on the intersection of art and science. See the selections of Tenderloin art pushers Ever Gold Gallery; Michael Cuffe, founder of online arts publication Warholian; Spoke Art, San Francisco’s newest art gallery and publishing house; writer/curator/street art aficionado Adam Reed Rozan; and Electric Works Gallery, which tends to focus on contemporary art work balancing strong graphic and conceptual elements; and other guest curators others to be announced. Live music performance by Tim Cohen’s band Magic Trick, whose music evokes the early era of rock ‘n’ roll with hints of psychedelic pop. Additional music by Britt Govea, DJ and founder of (((folkYEAH!))), whose sets feature contemporary and cutting edge artists who bridge a large gap of musical sounds and styles. Music presented by (((folkYEAH!))).

July 5
Soundwave NightLife
Celebrate opening night of San Francisco’s innovative three-month art and music festival, Soundwave, presented by MEDIATE and The Bold Italic. The night features a blend of art, science and sound around this year’s festival theme: challenging audiences to question their perspectives on the present and our hopes and fears about the future. Futuristic space rock band Lumerians performs in the piazza, musician Matt Baldwin will play amongst the fish in the coral reef, and guitarist Danny Paul Grody will play the skies of the Aurora Borealis in a mini-planetarium, with DJ Tristes Tropiques spinning the night away with disco house/post-punk tunes. Select Soundwave artists will present interactive demonstrations that explore future experiences of sound and technology, including Les Stuck’s video dance sensors, The Cellar Ensemble’s sound/light oracle instrument, Jay Kreimer’s empathic facial responder and instruments, Drew Detweiler’s Lumisketch, and Stephen Hurrel’s live sounds of the moving Earth. Plus, Apocalypse Cakes author Shannon O’Malley will serve samples and read from her guide to doomsday desserts.

July 12
Disposable Film Fest NightLife
This week, NightLife and the Disposable Film Festival want you to do it yourself. What’s a disposable film, you ask? A short film made on a non-professional device, so DIY is the phrase of the night. At Disposable Filmmaking 101, pick up tips and tricks for creating a masterpiece with whatever camera you have on you (even your cell phone). Discover the latest and greatest gadgets, apps and hacks you should have in your toolkit from the experts at PhotoJoJo, Boom Grip and Veetle, and then practice your storytelling at the flipbook animation booth and interviewing workshop. Attend a food filmmaking workshop and learn how to make food prep look glamorous on-camera. Stop by the Public Bikes station and contribute your story to their bike advocacy video. Disposable Film Festival’s 2012 competitive shorts will be shown throughout the night in the Forum Theater. Music by Slayers Club.

July 19
Mixology, Mixtapes and Remixes at NightLife
NightLife stirs things up with Noise Pop this week. Watch the mixologists at Cocktail Lab work their magic during demonstrations using seasonal ingredients. The San Francisco Mixtape Society will host a mixtape swap, so come prepared with a mix tape, mix CD or mix USB stick inspired by the theme of Night Creatures. You’ll walk away with someone else’s mix and a smile on your face. Watch masterful DJs remix a track before your eyes and ears in the Remix Lounge, featuring Friendzone at 6:00, Yalls at 7:00, and Giraffage at 8:00. Music in the Piazza, presented by Noise Pop, is by Heathered Pearls [Ghostly International, ISO50], followed by Dan the Automator. Renowned in underground circles for spearheading critically acclaimed underground projects Handsome Boy Modeling School with Prince Paul, and Deltron 3030 with Del tha Funkee Homosapien, Dan the Automator is perhaps best known as a co-founder of the widely successful anime influenced trip-hop project Gorillaz.

July 26
Runner’s NightLife
In honor of the 35th annual San Francisco Marathon, NightLife celebrates athletes who hit the pavement to push their limits mile after mile. Learn how to take care of your soles with a talk on foot and grounding massage by the SF School of Massage; stop by African Hall for a deep tissue massage and Jamba Juice sample; and make your own headbands and wristbands with SCRAP. Learn why ostriches are the fastest animals on two feet, clocking in at up to 43 mph. In the planetarium, catch the “Messier Marathon” at 6:30, a look at some of the 110 deep sky objects documented by astronomer Charles Messier, followed by two screenings of Earthquake: Evidence of a Restless Planet. Enter the “Runners Have Soul” fashion contest with your best 60s-70s soul–inspired look. Plus, Academy microbiologist Shannon Bennett will be on-hand to discuss her work with mosquitoes, and to conduct a eyebrow mite survey of NightLife guests. Hint: chances are you have them, and no, you can’t outrun them. But the good news is, they’re harmless! Music by the soul/boogie DJs Gordo Cabeza & Timoteo Gigante (MOMSF).

NightLife Basics:

What: NightLife at the California Academy of Sciences (for adults ages 21+) featuring music, cutting-edge science, and food and cocktails available for purchase

When: Every Thursday, 6-10 pm

Where: California Academy of Sciences, 55 Music Concourse Drive, Golden Gate Park, San Francisco

Cost: $12 per person ($10 for Academy members); Tickets available at the door or online at https://www.calacademy.org/tickets/nl.phpWeekly Details: Available at www.calacademy.org/nightlife

OMG, It’s Time for the 2012 Union Street Festival, Where It’s OK to be an Out Republican

Saturday, June 2nd, 2012

I’ll tell you, San Francisco doesn’t have too many Republicans but they manage to come out in force during Steve Restivo’s annual Union Street Eco Urban (or is it Urban Eco?) Street Festival.

I can just about assure that the Mitt Romney people will on the scene and out in force, with the ironing boards and whatnot – like this guy:

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All right now here’s your Union Street Festival Decision Tree:

“1. Is it sunny outside?

2. Can you stand crowds of overgrown sorority girls and fraternity boys?

3. Can you stand crowded beer gardens filled with the aforementioned?

If you answered yes to the above, proceed to the Union Street Festival. “

Dude, harsh!

But here’s the retort, from a party-lover, here’s the other side of this perfect dramaturgical dyad:

“SORRY FOR:

(1) PARTYING AND HAVING FUN AT A FESTIVAL

(2) NOT BEING A GRANDMA, and

(3) LIVING LIFE A LITTLE.”

So there you go.

The alcohol drinking used to be totally wide open, and then things got toned down a bit, and now I think even the walled-off beer “gardens” are gone. But you can always join one of the annual beer-fueled house parties, why not?

All right, let’s travel back to years past – here are some shots from yesteryear:

“Now here’s what’s funny when the so-called neighbors who own houses near traditional San Francisco street parties, like the Bay to Breakers Fun Run and the Union Street Festival. Inevitably, some of the actual neighbors, the people what live on the street itself, throw open their doors for anything-goes, beer-fueled house parties.

Anyway, today Andrea Koskey has the news about how there will be no more beer gardens at the Union Street Festival 2011, prompting this response from Serg of the Uptown Almanac:

“Yeah because rock and fucking roll brings the “wilder element.” Yeah I bet it must be nuts when your heehaw ass festival gets raided by tall-can wielding dave matthews fans. Ain’t no dancing in this town bitches! We want to sell shitty ass freeway artwork and braclets made out of old rocks and trash to senior citizens and sweater knots. Fucking dumb asses chewing on shitty grilled meat on a stick can’t hang out in beer gardens or do whatever dumb fucking bullshit it is that they do on their lame ass stoops on Union st. Union street can suck my balls, that shit has been herbfest from the gate, amatuer hour trainwreck can stay gone.”

O.K. then.

All right, get your house partay tickets or invites now. (It’ll be a piece of cake if you are popular/cute enough.)

The perils of post-adolescent Union Street Fest shotgunning. The front of this house faces Union:

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That entire residence was filled to the brim with partiers in 2008. Ah, memories.

All right, see you there, or not.

Now enjoy a trip down Union Street Festival Memory Lane:

This thing is biiiig – it will take you a long time to wander about Union:

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You know who proved popular was Tom Rigney, “electric violinist, Cajun fiddler, composer, graphic artist, and leader of the American roots music band, Tom Rigney and Flambeau.”

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Best in Show – Candy Wrapper Handbags, something like this, as seen on Oprah

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Micro cupcakes continue their dominance over the cuisine of the late aughts

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Your streetfest four basic food groups are poultry (including turkey legs, they’re not just for renaissance festivals anymore), corn on the cob, couscous (not pictured) and garlic fries (not pictured).

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2.5 star-rated Left at Albuquerque [sadly closed now, I think] offered crowd-pleasing  beer towers to sidewalk diners:

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Now they’re renting out A2B electric scooters to tourists. Do people really ride these things on the Golden Gate Bridge sidewalks at 20 per back and forth to Sausalito? People do. Anyway, Blazing Saddles bike rentals was offering test drives.

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Suds on the Roof, but much less than in years past. I think a man partying outdoors feels more like a man if he can have a red cup of suds.

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“Eco-Urban” Union Street featured a hell of a lot of gas powered Honda generators, but this year, not so much. Originally, I thought this distribution amplifier was a box full of car batteries, but now I’m at a loss at figuring out how this band got its power. If they had a generator, they hid it well.

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What’s this?

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It’s an overhead extention cord leading from a Union Street business to one of the food vendors in the middle of the street. Is that an extension cord being used as internal wiring? Cough electrical code cough.

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Oh, there it is! One of at least two Hondas in operation today.

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But at least all the amplified music won’t disturb this slumbering. ear-protected pooch.

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It’s big, in’nt?

And here’s the lateral view from our most-polarizing street fest yesterday, the day with “fewer hooligans” drinking beer according to at least one Sunday attendee:

I’ll tell you, myself, I didn’t see too many “drunken douchebags.” Myself. Anyway, it’s nice to see Union busy for a change.

Lots of swag from our corporate overlords at this street faire:

All right, here are a few of the Repubs. Yes on B and Fix MUNI Now were a few of their issues:

And here are some more. These people were promoting Dana Walsh (no, not the character on 24 and not this cutie, oh no – the Republican Dana Walsh).

As usual, the West End was strictly for kids:

And dogs, of course:

Fandango let people take two free spins on their unfairly-weighted (aka loaded, gaffed, cogged, weighted, crooked, or gag) swag roulette wheel – that was a mistake. Scored a bumper sticker the first try and then a precious $50 credit code the second. Bonus.

And of course, another Mini MUNI Meltdown, right on sked:

They’re Ba-aaack! The SFMTA Tries to Impose SFPark on Mission Bay Once Again – Plus SFPark.info Website

Friday, May 25th, 2012

I’ll tell you, when the Imperial Japanese Navy tried to invade Wake Island back in WWII, their first attempt, which involved months of planning, failed. The IJN was highly embarrassed but they knew that it was their job to impose themselves on Wake, to “manage” Wake, so they came back and succeeded on their second try. (And they beheaded a few Marines, but, byegones…)

And I’ll also tell you, when the Imperial SFMTA tried to impose SFPark on the Mission Bay and the Dogpatch and whatnot, their first attempt, which involved months of planning, failed. The SFMTA was highly embarrassed but they knew that it’s their job to impose SFPark, or whatever they’re calling it now, on the area. The college boys of the SFMTA just know, they just know it, that it’s their job to increase the power of the SFMTA and have the SFMTA grow and grow and grow.

Get all the deets on the Second Invasion of Mission Bay right here, and below.

And oh, here’s SFPark.info website, written by people who don’t approve of the worst aspects of the SFMTA and SFPark (or whatever they’re calling it these days.)

All right, now back to the official stuff. Uh, and in case you don’t know it, SFMTA, you suck – more proof of this is that your website has “insecure content.” [UPDATE: Good job, MUNI! You took care of that. Someday, you'll get the hang of the whole "Internet" thing.]

Or so they say:

In closing, MUNI sucks!

“Mission Bay parking planning community meeting – Saturday, June 16

Posted on 05.25.12 in AnnouncementsParking Planning|Share:Bookmark and Share

The public is invited to join the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency (SFMTA) at our second Mission Bay parking planning community meeting. We will discuss the revised plans for parking management in the neighborhood and gather public input. As Mission Bay evolves, we need to ensure that everyone on the road—cars, buses, bicycles, and pedestrians—can travel safely and smoothly.

Mission Bay parking planning community meeting 
Mission Creek Park Pavilion, 290 Channel Street, one block west of 4th and Channel Streets
Saturday, June 16
3-3:30 p.m. – Open House
3:30-4:30 p.m. – Public Comments (sign up by 3:20 p.m.)

The SFMTA seeks public input on the following:

  • Special event pricing to better manage parking demand during large events like Giants games and reduce congestion.
  • Extended meter hours to open up evening parking, particularly during evening games. This is separate from the SFMTA’s citywide Sunday metering proposal.
  • New meter installation schedule for meters approved in 2002, which will have SFpark demand-responsive pricing to ensure an optimum level of open parking spaces as Mission Bay grows.

During the open house section of the meeting, attendees can review plan details, talk directly with project planners, and submit written feedback. The public comment period follows.

CLICK HERE to learn more about Mission Bay parking planning
CLICK HERE for directions to the meeting venue, including nearby public transit

Please feel free to email us if you have any questions about the location or the project.

You can also stay up to date via Twitter and Facebook.”

Visit Your Golden Gate Park Rose Garden at Funston and Fulton, Why Not? It’s In Full Bloom These Days

Monday, July 18th, 2011

I don’t go around our Yelp four-star-rated Rose Garden too much as I generally save my flower viewing time for the Yelp five-star-rated Dahlia Dell near our Conservatory of Flowers.

But San Francisco’s official flower doesn’t really get going until August so roses will have to do until then.

Can you see the photographer here, with the Twinflash hanging off the lens and a water spray bottle hanging off the belt? That’s how some of them do it:

Via Glenn Franco Simmons – click to expand

Oh, and here’s my effort, on a dreaded sunny in the West Bay, showing people milling about the plots:

All right, see you there!