Posts Tagged ‘Keith Schneider’

Apparently, Nobody Wants to Buy the All-Electric CODA Automotive Sedan for $40K – Layoffs at Benicia “Assembly” Plant?

Friday, July 20th, 2012

I’ll tell you, the process of taking a very tired gasoline-engined Mitsubishi / Volvo economy car and plopping in a battery and an electric motor isn’t going so hot for CODA Automotive.

Get the updates here.

Click to expand

Nobody’s buying this car.

Nobody’s releasing sales numbers for this car.

But, here you go, have at it and buy one today – I don’t care.

The “Bay Area-Made” Coda Automotive Electric Car Finally Gets Its Big Review in the New York Times – Uh Oh!

Thursday, July 5th, 2012

Well, here it is, from the NYT’s Bradley Berman – it’s the big review of the little POS electric car that’s actually made in China but final-assembled in troubled Benicia, way out there in the eastern part of the North Bay.

Here’s your warning that things aren’t going so hot:

“The company even brought its chief executive from China. Coda hired Philip Murtaugh in 2011, a former top executive at the Chinese operations of General Motors and Chrysler. At the 2011 Los Angeles auto show, Mr. Murtaugh expressed concern over the reception for the car’s styling in the American market. First produced nearly about a decade ago, it gives the impression of a knockoff copy of a Y2K Nissan Sentra or Honda Civic. “The vehicle was chosen three years ago,” he told me. “I came in nine months ago. We couldn’t change it.

So, the reason why your state-subsidized vehicle sucks is Somebody Else’s Problem?

And then there’s this, the primary selling feature in some of the Coda ads, the large trunk:

“Yes, the trunk is cavernous, but I would gladly give up three inches of trunk depth for more legroom in the back seat.”

(The reason why the trunk is so big is that the Coda Sedan is actually a two-decade-old Mitsubishi Carisma designed for the European market, which, at the time, was in need of a little car with a big-ass trunk. Things didn’t work out, so the factory was shipped to China. I’m srsly.)

OK. Moving on.

To this:

“…difficult to accept the shortcomings of the Coda at its current price, despite its ability to grant 100 miles on a single charge.”

Yep.

Here it is. Actually it looks more like a 1992 Honda Civic 4-door sedan with giant aftermarket wheels, to my eyes: 

I’ve been telling you about this venture, this unholy alliance of Goldman Sachs execs (the people who brought us the failed WebVan, srsly, the same exact people), assorted federal government hangers-on (bureaucrats who know nothing about cars, electricity, or batteries or whatever), the People’s Republic of China, and other ne’er-do wells, for years now.

And then when the car comes out and its time for the Big Review from the sainted NYT (which had been pretty positive on this issue of this piece of junk), Coda Automotive gets a thumbs down.

Oh well.

That’s not much to show considering all the government subsidies this company is getting.

(And, mind you, this is after they lowered the MSRP down from the originally-planned $45,000(!), as I and host of others (the so-called haters) have been suggesting for a good long time.)

But at least twenty people in Benicia have jobs at the final assembly plant what are paying In-and-Out level wages….

Finally, Here Come the Chinese Cars – Electric CODA Sedan on Sale This Month – Oh, But It’s a Big, Fat, Expensive POS :(

Wednesday, March 7th, 2012

Get your David Herron Torque News right here and leave us begin…

From the same people who brought you WebVan (that would be Goldman Sachs people, you know the people what help create and the people who actually made money off of ridiculous WebVan) comes CODA: 

Direct from China, I mean, everybody just loves the People’s Republic of China these days, am I right, and only a half-decade late and now only about $10,000 overpriced, it’s your CODA Automotive Sedan:

Hold on a second, little piggy, let’s get some lipstick on you and somebody get Tianjin on the horn and ask them if they can get FoxConn to make us some dubs for the sport model, tell them we’ll offer $15 a piece: 

“Coda Automotive is in the final stretch before beginning first customer deliveries of the company’s all electric sedan.”

AND HAS BEEN FOR MORE THAN HALF A DECADE. HOW MANY THOUSANDS OF PEOPLE HAVE BEEN DISSAPOINTED WAITING FOR THIS CAR TO COME OUT BY THE “END OF 2008,” THE “END OF 2009,” THE “END OF 2010,” THE “MIDDLE OF 2011,” THE “END OF 2011,” THE “END OF JANUARY 2012,” THE “END OF FEBRUARY 2012,” AND NOW “THE END OF MARCH 2012?”

The Coda Sedan is partly manufactured by a Chinese automobile manufacturer,

IT’S A CHINESE CAR THOUGH, RIGHT? ACTUALLY, IT’S A FAILED MITSUBISHI/VOLVO JOINT FORMERLY CALLED THE MITSUBISHI CARISMA. IT CAME OUT IN 1994. THE EUROS DIDN’T WANT IT SO IT WAS NEVER PROPERLY DEVELOPED. THE PRODUCTION LINE TO MAKE THE CARISMA WAS SHIPPED TO CHINA. BUT UH OH, THE CARISMA FAILED IN THE CHINESE MARKET TOO, AS A $10,000 GASOLINE-ENGINED CAR. ANYWAY, THE BODY (THE DRIVETRAINLESS “GLIDER,” PRETTY MUCH EVERYTHING YOU CAN SEE) IS MADE IN CHINA, AND THE BATTERY IS MADE IS CHINA, AND ALL THAT THOSE PEOPLE IN BENICIA DO IS SLAP THE TWO TOGETHER, FUNDAMENTALLY. THEY CALL IT “FINAL ASSEMBLY.”

and is shipped partially assembled to a facility in Benicia, CA, near San Francisco, for final assembly.

OH, I SEE YOU REALIZE THAT. WOULDN’T THE CODA BE A BETTER PRODUCT IF FINAL ASSEMBLY WERE DONE AT ONE OF THE FACTORIES IN CHINA? YEP. IT’S LIKE A BOX OF KRAFT DINNER – IF THE PASTA PART IS MADE IN CANADA AND THE CHEESE POWDER PACKET IS MADE IN CANADA BUT KRAFT SHIPS THE BOXED PASTA AND CHEESE PACKETS TO BENICIA, CA FOR “FINAL ASSEMBLY,” WOULD YOU SAY THAT THAT KRAFT DINNER WAS “MADE IN AMERICA?” OR “AMERICAN MADE?” CODA WOULD.

It is roughly the size of a standard size sedan, with an outline that is completely compatible with what we think of as a normal car.

A NORMAL TWO-DECADE OLD CAR. ALSO, ITS A BIT SMALL, LIKE A 1994 HONDA CIVIC.

The Sedan comes with a 31 kilowatt-hour battery pack offering a 125 mile range on the UDDS test cycle, for an MSRP of $37,250. It is also available with a 36 kilowatt-hour battery pack, a 150 mile range, and an MSRP of $39,500. In both cases the cost of the Coda Sedan is comparable with the Nissan Leaf, Ford Focus Electric and Chevy Volt, while offering a much longer electric range.

IN BOTH CASES, IT COSTS MORE THAN A NISSAN LEAF, RIGHT?

The Sedan has an outstanding value proposition in comparison with other electric cars.

ABSOLUTELY FALSE.

It’s electric range is the longest of any non-luxury battery electric vehicle.

THE TESLA ROADSTER IS NOT A LUXURY CAR. IT HAS A LONGER RANGE.

This is further than the comparably priced Nissan Leaf (80-100 miles versus 125+)…

UH, LOWER-PRICED NISSAN LEAF. YOU KNOW THE NISSAN LEAF RIGHT? IT’S A MODERN CAR, ONE FROM THIS MILLENNIUM…

It has “best-in-class charging capability”, meaning the Coda’s on-board charger is 6.6 kilowatts for 25 miles gained per hour of charging, versus the 3.3 kilowatt charger on the Leaf.

I’LL GRANT YOU THAT. NISSAN ADMITS IT MADE A MISTAKE WITH THE CHARGER. THIS IS NOT A BIG DEAL THOUGH.

It has “best in class torque and horsepower”, with a 100 kilowatt (134 horsepower) electric drive offering 221 ft-lb’s of torque.

MEH.

The 10 year, 100,000 mile battery warranty is also “best in class”,

ANY WARRANTY FROM A CRAPPY, LYING COMPANY LIKE CODA CAN’T BE CONSIDERED “BEST IN CLASS.”

…as is the 14.1 cubic feet of trunk space.

PART OF THE REASON WHY THE CARISMA FAILED IS THAT THE MAKER, NEDCAR, MADE THE TRUNK TOO BIG AND THE BACK SEAT TOO SMALL, SO THERE YOU GO.

Its price (MSRP) per mile of electric range is a “best in class” $292/mile versus $352/mile for the Nissan Leaf, $392/mile for the Ford Focus Electric, and a whopping $428/mile for the Mitsubishi i-Miev.

THIS IS A RIDICULOUS STAT.

The various ad

WELL PLAYED, NO ERRORS IN _THAT_ SENTENCE.

Hausch also presented two tables comparing cost of ownership of the Coda Sedan against the Toyota Prius and Toyota Corolla.

UH, ARE YOU CONFLATING THE BEST CAR COMPANY IN THE WORLD WITH ONE OF THE WORST? I THINK SO.

In both cases the Coda Sedan was shown to be cheaper to own, but this depends on which way the price of gasoline goes. The cost of ownership model comes from Edmunds, and accounts for the depreciation (the difference between purchase price and residual value after 5 years), taxes and fees, financing costs, fuel costs, insurance, maintenance, and repairs. Because the Coda Sedan is more expensive than either the Prius or Corolla, the depreciation and financing costs are higher, however this is more than made up for in fuel, maintenance and repair costs.

SO A SAN FRANCISCO RESIDENT RENTS A GARAGE TO HAVE A PLACE TO CHARGE A CODA AT NIGHT. THERE GOES YOUR BUDGET.

With $4/gallon gasoline, according to Coda’s figures, the five year ownership cost for a Toyota Prius Liftback IV is $43,268, while for the Coda Sedan it is $40,038. For the Toyota Corolla LE, and $5.50/gallon gasoline, the totals come out to $41,177 for the Corolla and $40,038 for the Coda. But, wait, you’re going to say gasoline doesn’t cost $5.50/gallon. Yes, the national average gas price is much less than that, today. Some parts of California are currently, today, paying over $5 per gallon for gasoline.

AGAIN, YOU CAN’T COMPARE POORLY-ENGINEERED VEHICLES WITH ANY TOYOTA PRODUCT. YOU’RE FORGETTING THAT THE CODA SEDAN IS A BIG POS.

Gasoline prices are far more volatile than are electricity prices, and electric car owners are immune to gasoline price shocks such as the one currently unfolding around us.

AM I SHOCKED TO SEE GAS OVER $4 AGAIN? NO.

See also Why electric cars are cheaper to drive than gasoline cars.

UH, NO THEY’RE NOT.

Enough about all that, what about the car?

YES. LET’S.

First off, the fit and finish are excellent

NOPE!

and it looks really nice.

NOPE!

The prototype Coda brought two years ago was drab and humdrum by comparison, and clearly Coda’s designers have spent the last two years focusing on details.

FROM HITLER TO GANDHI OR SOMETHING, HUH?

It’s a five seater sedan, however reports from those who sat in the rear seat said it was a bit cramped.

YES YES YES, INDEED. A BIT CRAMPED.

The drivers seat was comfortable with controls where you expect them. Except, that is, for the gear shifter. Instead of a shift lever to select between Park, Reverse and Drive, one turns a knob. The knob is straight-forward to use, but is different than normal and will require a bit of an accommodation period. Coda’s knob makes more sense than the one in the Leaf.

DISAGREE.

Handling is responsive with no lag between turning the wheel and direction changes.

WOW! IT TURNS LEFT _AND_ RIGHT!

Acceleration is good,

NOPE!

however we were driving on city streets giving limited ability to fully test this. The regenerative braking was pleasant and almost good enough for a one foot driving driving style where you accelerate, then let regen slow the car. Regen response starts soft, then as the car slows down the regen braking becomes stronger, almost to the point of completely stopping the car, at which point the regen lets up and in order to actually stop one has to operate the brakes.

SOMETHING I DIDN’T KNOW. OK.

Coda has already made first deliveries of the Sedan to dealerships, including the Del Grande Dealership Group (DGDG)

REALLY, THE DGDG? HURRAY! LET’S ALL GO THERE NOW AND BUY BUY BUY!

which will handle sales in the SF Bay Area. Hausch says the company is on track for first customer deliveries beginning in March 2012.

“ON TRACK” SINCE 2007, RIGHT?

The Sedan is sold only in California.

THE SEDAN WILL ONLY BE SOLD IN CALIFORNIA, RIGHT? FOR NOW, ANYWAY. HEY, WHEN IS CODA GOING TO GO FULL SOLYNDRA? PLACE YOUR BETS.

In short Coda has put together a very good value proposition,

NOPE!

a low cost of ownership,

NOPE!

excellent all-electric range,

WE’LL SEE.

while packaging all this in a nicely appointed sedan.

NOPE!

The company’s main challenge, as a small automotive startup, will be getting the attention of potential buyers who are accustomed to going to the large automakers.

THE COMPANY’S MAIN CHALLEGE WILL BE TO MAKE A PRODUCT THAT PEOPLE WILL WANT TO BUY. THE SEDAN ISN’T A PIECE OF CRAP BECAUSE CODA IS A STARTUP, IT’S A PIECE OF CRAP BECAUSE CODA DID A CRAPPY JOB.

Coda Automotive DeathWatch, Day 143: It’s Official, There’ll be No Electric Car Factory Running in the East Bay This Year

Wednesday, March 2nd, 2011

Remember back in the day, way back when our MSM was fawning over Coda Automotive, talking about when Benicia was going to get its very own electric car factory or final assembly plant or whatever?

Well that didn’t quite work, so that one’s down the Mem’ry Hole, never ever to be discussed never ever again.

So the new idea is for CODA to build its Chinese electric car, wait for it, in China!

Can you imagine how inefficient that will be, you know, taking the Made in China battery and putting it in the engineless, Made-in China “glider”* actually in China? But who knows, that idea is just crazy enough to work!

But wait a second, isn’t the Coda Sedan basically a primitively-electrified version of the failed 1990′s-era and never-really-updated Euro-market Mitsubishi Carisma? And wasn’t this very same design rejected by the Chinese market when it sold for $9000-something as a gas-powered car in the mid-2000′s?

Isn’t the Coda Sedan just a big $45,000 electric POS?

Bingo!

But somehow, these cars

…will be sold at an “unbelievable value,” Chief Executive Officer Philip Murtaugh said at a briefing in Beijing today.”

Uh, no.

And try this one on for size: “We won’t be perfect but we will certainly be class-leading.”

Uh, yes on the not perfect part, but no on the class-leading part.

(What’s that? I forgot about Tesla?

Nope!)

(What’s that I forgot about Xap! or what have you?

Nope!)

Hey, is Coda Too Big To Fail already? Take a look below and then You Make The Call.

TTFN.

CODA’s investors include:

  • Aeris CAPITAL – a private Swiss investment office
  • Harbinger Capital Partners – private hedge fund based in New York City, New York.
  • Riverstone Holdings – a private equity firm based in New York City, New York.
  • Piper Jaffray – a U.S. middle-market investment banking firm based in Minneapolis, Minnesota
  • Angeleno Group – a Los Angeles based private equity firm
  • EDB Investments (EDBI) – an investment firm headquartered in Singapore
  • Countyline LLC – an investment entity owned by Tony Pritzker and J.B. Pritzker
  • Miles L. Rubin – Founder and Chairman Emeritus of CODA Automotive; former CEO of Detroit Iron & Steel Industries, Reliance Manufacturing, Puritan Fashions Corp. and Polo Ralph Lauren Jeanswear
  • Steven “Mac” Heller – Executive Chairman of CODA Automotive; former Goldman Sachs Head of Mergers & Acquisitions, Worldwide and Co-Head of the Investment Banking Division
  • Tom Steyer – Managing Director of Hellman & Friedman, a San Francisco private equity firm; Founder, Co-Managing Partner and Chief Investment Officer of Farallon Capital; member of the Board of Trustees of Stanford University
  • Les Wexner – Chairman and CEO of Limited Brands
  • Henry “Hank” Paulson – former U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, former Chairman and CEO of Goldman Sachs and special representative of the U.S.-China Strategic Economic Dialogue
  • Mack McLarty – (Thomas “Mack” McLarty) Former Chief of Staff for President Bill Clinton, President of McLarty Associates and McLarty Companies, a transportation business based in Little Rock, Arkansas
  • Kevin Czinger – Senior Strategic Advisor, CODA Automotive; Former President and CEO at CODA Automotive, executive at Global Signal, Webvan Group, Bertelsmann AG, and Goldman Sachs

Board of Directors

  • Miles L. Rubin – Founder and Chairman Emeritus, CODA Automotive; former CEO of Detroit Iron & Steel Industries, Reliance Manufacturing, Puritan Fashions Corp. and Polo Ralph Lauren Jeanswear
  • Steven “Mac” Heller – Executive Chairman, CODA Automotive; former Goldman Sachs Head of Mergers & Acquisitions, Worldwide and Co-Head of the Investment Banking Division
  • Alan Chesick – Acting Legal Advisor of CODA Automotive, former general counsel of Fortress Investment Group
  • Daniel Weiss – Co-Founder and Managing Partner at Angeleno Group LLC, a leading Los Angeles-based private equity firm focused on high growth investments in the energy sector
  • John Bryson – Former Chairman, CEO and President of Edison International from 1990 through 2008, a director at The Boeing Company, The Walt Disney Company, and the California Institute of Technology
  • Niall Davis – One of ten founding partners of Swiss aeris CAPITAL AG, a large global private equity firm
  • Philip Murtaugh – CEO, CODA Automotive; former Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of GM China, EVP International Operations of SAIC
  • James P. McGinnis – Managing Director, Harbinger Capital Partners
  • Lord John Browne – Managing Director and Managing Partner of Riverstone Holdings LLC, President of the Royal Academy of Engineering, Chair of the Tate, Member of the House of Lords}}

Board of Advisors

  • Mack McLarty – (Thomas “Mack” McLarty) Former Chief of Staff for President Bill Clinton, President of McLarty Associates and McLarty Companies, a transportation business based in Little Rock, Arkansas
  • Dr. Thomas Cardello – Partner of Sunrise Capital, an institutional fund manager, Advisory Director and former MD of Global Electronic Derivative Market making for Morgan Stanley
  • Dr. Michael Wang – Manager of the Systems Assessment Section of the Center for Transportation Research at Argonne Labs, serves as a senior advisor to the Chinese government on new vehicle technology and alternative energy production
  • Henry “Hank” Paulson – former U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, former Chairman and CEO of Goldman Sachs and special representative of the U.S.-China Strategic Economic Dialogue
  • Thomas F. Steyer – Managing Director of Hellman & Friedman, a San Francisco private equity firm; Founder, Co-Managing Partner and Chief Investment Officer of Farallon Capital; member of the Board of Trustees of Stanford University
  • Woo C. Lee – Head of Asia for the advisory firm JL Thornton & Company, formerly a U.S. diplomat at American embassies in China, Japan, Australia and Southeast Asia
  • Thomas R. McDaniel – Director of SunPower Corp., SemGroup, LP, Cypress Envirosystems, and the Senior Care Action Network and Formerly executive vice president, chief financial officer and treasurer of Edison International
  • Kevin Czinger – Senior Strategic Advisor, CODA Automotive; Former President and CEO at CODA Automotive, executive at Global Signal, Webvan Group, Bertelsmann AG, and Goldman Sachs

*Basically, everything but the powertrain and battery

Coda Automotive DeathWatch, Day 33: CEO Fired, or Did He Quit? And Whither That “Final Assembly Plant” in Benicia?

Tuesday, November 16th, 2010

I’ll tell you, the only reason why I started up the Coda Automotive DeathWatch®* is because the final assembly plant for these electric car was / is going to be in the bay area. Check it:

Coda Automotive, based in Southern California, may soon start assembling in Benicia a plug-in sedan that the company plans to start selling this year. Coda is negotiating with Amports, which runs an auto-processing plant there, to do the work.”

Now, I’ll nitpick by noting that that place in Benicia will be / was supposed to be merely a “final assembly plant,” where the made-in-China “glider” (basically the whole entire car save for the battery and motor and associated electrical bits) would receive its made-someplace-else-in-China battery. You can’t really call it an automotive “assembly plant,” IMO.

Anyway, here’s the news, the CEO is gonepoof! Check it:

“Just three days after Michael Jackson, Coda Automotive‘s senior vice president of global sales, marketing and distribution , resigned to start his own company, the company’s CEO, Kevin Czinger, is also stepping down from his position. While we could only speculate as to the reason for his departure from the Coda limelight, top executive’s don’t typically bow out at a critical time in a company’s development because things are going swimmingly. Indeed, if we were to guess whether or not some vehicles would reach customers by the end of the year as had been planned, we would say, not. Last we heard the company hadn’t yet closed a deal with Amports for final assembly in Benicia, CA.”

So, last month’s problem for CODA was the issue with getting taxpayer money to pay for a battery factory in Ohio (seeing as how part (all? most?) of the factory would be Chinese-owned), and this month’s problems are the loss of the famous CEO, the face of the company and the fact that, once again, there’s another another delay to the start of production (like another six months? Who knows…)

The CODA’s are coming, the CODA’s are coming! (Maybe.)

(Did you know that the average Chinese college senior has no fracking idea what this above image is all about? So, take off the inflammatory Coda car images and hand this photo of Tank Man to students at the highest-level universities in China, and then they’ll just stare it mouths agape having no idea what it is. Isn’t that sad?)

Anyway, instead of an old white guy who doesn’t know Jack about the car industry but with a law degree from Harvard and an extensive background at Goldman Sachs running things at CODA, we now have:

a different old white guy who doesn’t know Jack about the car industry but with a law degree from Harvard and an extensive background at Goldman Sachs running things at CODA.

How’s that for diversity, girlfriends?

But don’t get these twins mixed up or anything, turns out that they’re totally different! Or at least that’s party line, Comrade:

The skills that are called for to get the company to that point are frequently different from the skills that are necessary to move the company forward after that point.”

(All this fussing and feuding is redolent of Tesla Motors, non?)

I forget why we’re subsidizing these POS companies, actually.

In other news:

-Turns out that the GM Volt is not an electric car. It’s not, it’s a plug-in hybrid. You can’t mention El Volto in the same sentence as the Nissan Leaf. Please make a note of this.

-The Nissan Leaf is a coming to town starting Saturday, November 20th, 2010. It’s a real electric car but it’s not made by Coda Automotive so that’s why Coda says it sucks and it’s not made by Tesla Motors, so that’s why people from Tesla say it sucks. But you can test drive Leafs / Leaves soon, so why not? And you can do it at Moscone Center as late as 9:30 PM so bring a date on Saturday.

-Every CEO from every electric car company feels it’s his/her obligation, not just a right, but an obligation to lie to you. If they didn’t lie to you, then they’d get replaced one way or another. Please make a note of this as well.

Anyway, I don’t care, put down 500 clams on a Coda, I won’t cry. Maybe you’ll get it next year, maybe not.

Choose wisely.

*Just kidding about the ® thing. It’s fun to type though – just try holding down Alt key and typing 0174. ®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®!!!

Coda Automotive DeathWatch, Day 5: Informed Vs. Uninformed Journalistic Coverage – A Case Study

Monday, October 18th, 2010

First up is San Francisco Chronicle Staff Writer David R. Baker with:

Coda steers toward Benicia to build electric car

It’s perfectly fine.

This sedan was supposed to arrive in 2008, 2009, 2010, and now 2011. Oh well:

But check out this one from last week from Keith Schneider”

Talk of Tianjin Climate Conference: China and U.S. Are Electrifying The Car

Uh oh. Here’s an error sampler, covering just three sentences.

“The Coda’s drive train* and electric engine* are American* designs built* in factories* in the U.S. The car’s safety systems were engineered by American and European experts and will be built by American** companies. And a Chinese auto manufacturer will receive all*** of the various parts and assemble them under contract into new cars for shipment to the U.S.”

Oh well…

And Mr Czinger? Your baggage has arrived, where should we put it? Oh, inside the door marked “Denial?” Will do.

“You have to get pretty deep into the story before the real truth comes out: this thing is mostly made in China, the “trading partner” that gave us toxic drywall, deadly dog food, and tainted toothpaste. The Chinese also produced poisoned baby formula and schools that collapsed during an earthquake, killing thousands. Would you really want a Chinese car?”
 
Uh oh.
  
Oh well…
 
*[Sic] Reveals writer’s ignorance. Let’s see here, archaic phrase used by the Man from Mars, you can call a engine a motor but not the other way ’round, this car is not an American design, and factories, what? 

**The extra 200 pounds of metal bracing added to each glider so that this aging design can score better in crash tests – that’s going to be built by American companies in China?

***How wrong could you be? Who told you this - are you just guessing at everything?