Posts Tagged ‘kelch’

Know Your Legion of Honor Faberge Eggs: #8, the Kelch Rocaille

Friday, May 8th, 2009

The fantastic Artistic Luxury exhibit at the Legion of Honor Museum continues. Read all about it here and here.

But what about the Faberge Eggs? Here’s one from 1902: the Kelch Rocaille:

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Currently it’s owned by FAMSF Board of Trustees President Diane B. “Dede” Wilsey, but let’s not forget about its history:

“When the wealthy Russian heiress Varvara Bazanova married cash-poor nobleman Nikolai Ferdinandovich Kelkh (also spelled Kelch) in 1892, she obtained a noble title and he obtained access to her money. When Kelkh died two years later, the heiress married Nikolai’s younger brother, Alexander.

The Kelch Rocaille Egg, made by Faberge in 1902, was one of a series of seven ostensibly bought by Alexander as a gift for his wife, but in truth paid for with her money.”

Rocaille means ”rococo” - and this thing certainly is rococo a gogo, quite ornate it is. And this could be your last chance to see it for a while ’cause the expiration date for all the famous Faberge eggs as well as the entire show is May 31, 2009.

Eggs, precious eggs!

Know Your Legion of Honor Faberge Eggs: #5 Kelch Bonbonnière Egg

Saturday, April 11th, 2009

The fantastic Artistic Luxury exhibit at the Legion of Honor Museum continues. Read all about it here and here.

But what about the Faberge Eggs? Here’s one from 1903: The Kelch Bonbonnière Egg:

Click to expand.

It looks as if it could be an Imperial Egg, the likes of which were given to royal family members back in the day, but it’s a Kelch Egg. The unseen initials B.K. (no, not Blood Killas, nor British Knights, nor Berkelium, nor Burger King) tell the story – they stand for Barbara (aka Varvara) Kelch:

Every year from 1898 until 1904 Alexander Kelch ordered an Easter egg from Fabergé, modeled on the Imperial series, as a present for his wife, who no doubt also paid for them. No doubt, too, that the Kelch eggs cost them considerably more than those made for the Imperial family, given the parsimony of the Romanovs and the generosity of the nouveaux riches. The seven Kelch eggs are as fine, if not even more sumptuous, than those in the Imperial series.”

Mmmmm… sumptuous.

Eggs, precious eggs!