Posts Tagged ‘korean’

Asiana Air Crash Update – Reviewing KTVU TV’s “Sum Ting Wong” Fiasco from 2014 – TRIGGER WARNING: Speculation

Friday, January 24th, 2014

1. So KTVU, the way to make up for your error is to disclose what occurred, IMO. The way NOT to do it is to air “Success Makers*” featuring “Survivor” winner Yul Kwon interviewing other notable Korean Americans. This tit-for-tat, Black-Eye vs. Feather-in-the-Cap, yes-but-is-it-good-for-the-Jews accounting system is a big fat joke and everybody knows it. If you all want to air this kind of “aspirational” bullcrap at 7 AM on a Sunday morning, well then be my guest, but you don’t need to commit the U.S. Media Blunder of the Year 2013 first, right? One thing has nothing to do with the other, IRL. You can throw a bone to the Asian American Journalists Association whenever you want, right? Why connect the two?

2. OTOH, KTVU, if you want to go through the pretty much pointless process of sending out take-down notices hither and yon so that certain people, certain older, out of touch people, can see that you’re trying to placate them, well, at least that makes more sense than Success Makers.

3. So, KTVU, what happened? Your viewing public is confused. And rightly so, since you’re hiding your own story from them. Some think that you all got punked by another TV station as payback for all the crowing you were doing about your Asiana coverage up to that point. Others think that some low-level KTVU employee made a joke and then things got out of hand. But that’s not what I heard.

4. My theory. Some aviation buff from the Midwest, let’s say in Illinois or a neighboring state, posts on a regional forum that the names all the pilots have just been revealed: “Sum Ting Wong,” “Wi Tu Lo,” “Ho Lee Fuk,” and “Bang Ding Ow.” This joke just sat out there for a day or so and then it started getting repeated on other boards and Twitter and the like. A retired pilot, somebody that KTVU had dealt with in the past, came across the names but didn’t get the joke. So he earnestly passed the names along to a contact at KTVU and that’s what got the ball rolling. Do you want a guess on who that person is? Well, my WAG is a former United Airlines pilot who’s now living in a leafy East Bay suburb. Someone who is older. He’s younger than my grandmother, who would not have gotten the joke either, but old enough to have grown up in a more sober-minded era. (That’s an era where a kind of blue-collar, single-income fam could actually afford to buy a Brady Bunch kind of house on an ironically-named street just before it massively appreciated.)

5. So then, the KTVU crew runs the names by a Chinese-American(?) woman who  doesn’t wonder why all the Korean pilots have Chinese-sounding names? (NB: If you don’t have a Kim, a Lee, or a Park in there, then something might very well be suspect.) And the news reader lady, who, after all is pretty much mindlessly reading the Teleprompter, pronounced one of the names as Fook instead of Fuck and boy aren’t we clever to not make that mistake

6. I’ll tell you, it’ll take a long time before a carrier like Asiana has four Chinese national pilots on one of its widebodies. OTOH, there were a heck of a lot of Chinese passengers on the Korean plane. Why’s that? Well, I’ll tell you, one of my former co-workers flew to South Korea last year just before the SFO disaster and this person specifically avoided using the two big Korean carriers even though it cost hundreds more to do so. Why? A strong mistrust of South Korean aviation safety. So, a Chinese carrier, Taiwanese, American? Sure, but not Asiana. One assumes that Asiana had pretty low fares in the summer of 2013…

7. So KTVU, as long as your happy, huh? You had a problem, you dealt with it, you fired some people, you paid off some settlement(s) for firing some people, you aired an aspirational TV show to several thousands of viewers and that’s that. What this all reminds me of is what the San Francisco Chronicle went through after it posted DIARY OF A SEX SLAVE, which was a major investment in time and money.** Boy, that one really hit the fan. After this similar kind of backlash, the Chron agreed not to syndicate the series, which prolly cost the Chron big bucks I’m guessing. Oh well.

8. Anyway, KTVU, that’s what some people might be thinking, but not saying. Try to focus on what’s correct, not what’s confirmed, you old MSM dinosaur you. The way you handled this mess is a bigger problem than the initial mess itself is what I’m saying. Go and sin no more. And I’ll tell you, the FAA / NTSB gets an A+ so far for the accident investigation. It’s like a WHAT WENT WRONG SO WE DON’T DO THIS AGAIN kind of thing. Why doesn’t KTVU do the same kind of thing so we can all benefit?

*”I’ll be hosting a special on KTVU tomorrow night after the 49ers-Seahawks game. The show is called “Success Makers” and I profile/interview four Asian American trailblazers, including Gideon Yu (president of the 49ers and former CFO of Facebook) and Daniel Dae Kim (star of Lost and Hawaii 5-0). Their stories are fascinating, and notwithstanding the painfully rusty host, the show is actually pretty eye-opening.”

**The problem was that the important parts were single-sourced. (“Typical college student?” Please.) IMO, that was the real prob with it. 

“Fukuppy” Media Disaster Continues – MSM-types from CNN, TIME, and the Washington Post Victimized – Who Will Be Next?

Monday, October 14th, 2013

This is from yesterday - it involved a Washington Post employee.

Here’s TIME from just a few hours ago

“Social media platforms over the weekend were brimming with sarcastic critiques of Fukushima’s newest unofficial mascot, Fukuppy, after a local refrigerator manufacturer in the disaster-struck prefecture unveiled their latest publicity creation.

Read more: http://newsfeed.time.com/2013/10/14/look-its-fukuppy-to-the-rescue/#ixzz2hhVmRXLI 

And here’s CNN:

Kyung Lah ‏@KyungLahCNN

Truth is stranger than fiction. #Fukushima‘s new “cute” mascot is Fukuppy. http://www.fukusima.co.jp/  #CNN

And actually, MSM, Twitter was debunking this myth three days ago.

It was there if you knew how to look for it?

FTR, Fukushima is a family name as well as a place name.

FTR, “.co” in a URL means company, not government.

On It Goes…

Fukuppy: Washington Post Correspondent Chico Harlan Pollutes Twitter with Misinformation about a Japanese Corporate Mascot

Sunday, October 13th, 2013

[UPDATE: Oh, here we go: "The thing I passed along yesterday about the "Fukuppy" mascot -- please disregard; it has nothing whatsoever to do with Fukushima Prefecture." So, move along, people. Nothing to see here. Excepting that initial Tweet is not the way you're supposed to pass along info on Twitter, but anyway..]

Here’s the Tweet In Question:

“A Japanese corporation created a mascot to enhance the image of Fukushima and reduce food fears. Its name: Fukuppy. http://www.fukusima.co.jp/character/index.html …

See?

But it’s just a coincidence that the family name Fukushima (Lucky Island, something like that) is also the name of a prefecture in Japan.

So, Fukushima Industries makes fridges out of Osaka (which is Down South, Japan-wise) and this whole deal has nothing to do with Fukushima Prefecture (which is Up North) or any nuclear panner plants.

I’ll concede that this isn’t the best choice for a mascot name:

The jibber-jabber underneath is Fukuppy’s Dewar’s Profile – he comes from a Fukushima brand fridge and he’s coy about being a boy.

Now, one supposes that Fukuppy the winged egg mascot is concerned about keeping your food safe and cool. One supposes.

So, what Chico should have done was to check his work and/or show his work and/or do a retweet rather than to just cite the source.

IMO.

And 20 hours is a long time to do a correction in the Twittersphere, regardless of whichever time zone you live in.

This is akin to confusing the Washington Redskins mascot with the government of Washington State. IMO.

Just saying.

The Craziest Billboard Ever: “Visit Beautiful Island! Dodko, Korea!” – Insincerely Looming Over the I-80 in SoMA

Friday, August 30th, 2013

All right, here we go:

“The Liancourt Rocks … are a group of small islets in the Sea of Japan.”

Visiting these rocks for just 20 minutes, maximum, would involve a two lengthy flights* and then a 14-hour round-trip boat ride.

So this billboard, which is getting a lot of attention in South Korea, isn’t to promote tourism, it’s to promote politics:

Click to expand

So it’s just like this one** (that used to be near AT&T Park?) that was put up by a Yelp three-star dentist from San Jose, who*** probably charges too much money if he has the spare cash to produce ineffectual billboards like these.

Which is fair enough.

I s’pose.

Now the thing about the “East Sea” is that every sea is an east sea, right? So we should rename the Atlantic Ocean the East Ocean because that’s how it seems from our perspective? And without Japan, the Sea of Japan would just be the Pacific Ocean, right?

All right, I’ll just sit back and wait for the invasion of the Liancourt Rocks, which is never going to happen, but if it did, it would go a little something like this.

All the deets:

“The Liancourt Rocks, also known as Dokdo or Tokto (독도/獨島, literally “solitary island”) in Korean, and Takeshima (たけしま/竹島?, literally “bamboo island”) in Japanese,[1] are a group of small islets in the Sea of Japan.” 

* Crew Resource Management optional?

** Significant? No. Nobody cared about the World Baseball Classic, 90% of San Franciscans have no knowledge of it.

*** Am I supposed to know what “Top Best *8*” means? I don’t.

San Francisco’s Connection to the North Korean Crisis: Pier 80, USS Tripoli, and THAAD Ballistic Missile Defense

Wednesday, April 3rd, 2013

1. Here’s the news of the day:

Anti-missile systems sent to Guam to counter North Korean threat

2. Those systems are called Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD).

3. THAAD was developed using the former USS Tripoli (LPH-10), an Iwo Jima-class amphibious assault ship that’s basically a mini aircraft carrier.

4. The USS Tripoli was based at Pier 80 in Dogpatch as recently as last year and it’s still there right now, for all I know.

That’s the connection.

That’s San Francisco’s contribution to the war effort.

(And, just saying, THAAD could come in handy when dealing with NK’s big buddy China…)

All the deets:

“She was decommissioned in 1995 and as of 2004, she was on loan to the Army, but remained laid up at Mare Island Naval Shipyard. In December 2006, the ship was towed to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, where it now has a high-tech role as a launch platform with the nation’s developing ballistic missile defense program. Three times the ship was towed some 100 miles off shore and used to launch small ballistic missiles, which are then intercepted by Terminal High Altitude Area Defense Missiles, test-fired from the Pacific Missile Range Facility. The last test in the series was performed 26 October, when the ship fired a “Scud-like” missile, which was successfully intercepted. The ship will be towed back to the San Francisco Bay Area for the winter. Kaua’i lacks a suitable land-based launch site, and the costs of building one would far exceed the approximately $600,000 per year it costs to use the old warship, so the vessel returned to Pearl Harbor for a second series of tests in late spring 2008.[1] As of 16 June 2012 she berthed at Pier 80 in San Francisco, CA.”

From 2008:

Well, look what just got towed in from Hawaii. Fresh from testing of the Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) system, San Francisco’s favorite former helicopter carrier, the former U.S.S. Tripoli (LPH-10), had its ups and downs in the Aloha State.

Read all about the post-retirement adventures of the USS Tripoli at Telstar Logistics.

Under the Golden Gate Bridge:

Who knows what the future will be for this old ship. Probably more missile launching.

And from 2010:

Now I could tell you all about the supr sekrt USS Tripoli (LPH-10 (Landing Platform, Helicopter)) but that would be MUY PRO HI BI DA DO (I say that in Spanish because that’s how not allowed it would be).

Suffice to say the old girl has been chilling in the Dogpatch lately, right next to ridiculously hilly Potrero Hill. See?

Click to expand

Where, oh where, will it get towed to next?

What, oh what, will it next launch into the Heav’ns Above?

Courage.

The Trip as seen off of Kauai in the 808 State (or somewhere else in the wide Pacific) during the sum, sum, summertime. Whoosh:

E komo mai. Nou ka hale, USS Tripoli

San Francisco Welcomes South Korean Navy – Gangam Style on Market Street – Shopping at Macy’s

Wednesday, October 3rd, 2012

Here they are:

Click to expand

[UPDATE: Upon further review, these aren't Chinese naval uniforms after all:

At first I thought they could have been from the Chinese People's Liberation Army Navy.

And oh, look what's on the PLAN's to-do list:

See that? In addition to taking over Japanese islands (the Senkakus and others), the neo-Imperial Chinese Navy wants to take over Vietnamese, Malaysian, Filipino, and Bruneian islands as well. And don't forget about Taiwan.

But we're being visited by a South Korean ship so it's all good.]

Photos from Asian Art Museum’s “In the Moment: Japanese Art from the Larry Ellison Collection” – Opens June 2013

Thursday, September 20th, 2012

Here’s the big news from Kenneth Baker yesterday.

More deets:

“Called “In the Moment: Japanese Art from the Larry Ellison Collection,” the exhibit will include works by noted artists of the Momoyama (1573—1615) and Edo (1615—1868) periods along a 13th—14th century wooden sculpture of Shotoku Taishi; six-panel folding screens dating to the 17th century by Kano Sansetsu; and 18th century paintings by acclaimed masters Maruyama Okyo and Ito Jakuchu.”

This should be an excellent show.

All photos courtesy of the Asian Art Museum:

Shotoku Taishi as an Infant, Unknown, Kamakura period (1249-1335). Wood with polychromy. Larry Ellison Collection

Tigers (detail), 1779. By Maruyama Okyo (Japanese, 1733-1795). One of a pair of hanging scrolls; ink and light colors on paper. Larry Ellison Collection.

Auspicious Pine, Bamboo, Plum, Crane and Turtles, Edo period (1615-1868),ca. 1630-1650. By Kano Sansetsu (Japanese, 1590-1651,By Sansetsu, Kano 1590-1651. One of a pair of six panel folding screens. Ink and colors on gold. Larry Ellison Collection

Oh, and don’t forget about Korean Culture Day this Sunday, September 23, 2012. It’s free!

“IN THE MOMENT: JAPANESE ART FROM THE LARRY ELLISON COLLECTION
Asian Art Museum debuts Ellison’s Japanese art collection, coinciding with 2013 America’s Cup

SAN FRANCISCO, September 20, 2012—Next summer, as the America’s Cup Challenger Series takes to San Francisco Bay, the Asian Art Museum will feature an exhibition of Japanese art from the rarely seen collection of Larry Ellison, Oracle CEO and owner of ORACLE TEAM USA, defender of the 2013 America’s Cup.

In the Moment: Japanese Art from the Larry Ellison Collection will introduce approximately 80 exceptional artworks spanning 1,300 years. The exhibition explores the dynamic nature of art selection and display in traditional Japanese settings, where artworks are often temporarily presented in response to a special occasion or to reflect the change of seasons. In the Moment also considers Mr. Ellison’s active involvement in displaying art in his Japanese-style home, shedding light on his appreciation for Japan’s art and culture.

Included in the exhibition are significant works by noted artists of the Momoyama (1573–1615) and Edo (1615–1868) periods along with other important examples of religious art, lacquer, woodwork, and metalwork. Highlights include a 13th–14th century wooden sculpture of Shotoku Taishi; six-panel folding screens dating to the 17th century by Kano Sansetsu; and 18th century paintings by acclaimed masters Maruyama Okyo and Ito Jakuchu.

“This exhibition offers a rare glimpse of an extraordinary collection,” said Jay Xu, director of the Asian Art Museum. “We aim to present it in a fresh and original way that explores traditional Japanese principles governing the relationship of art to our surroundings and social relationships.”

The exhibition is organized by the Asian Art Museum and curated by Dr. Laura Allen, the museum’s curator of Japanese art, and Melissa Rinne, associate curator of Japanese art, in consultation with Mr. Ellison’s curator, Dr. Emily Sano.

The exhibition is on view June 28, 2013 through September 22, 2013. The Asian Art Museum will serve as the only venue for the exhibition.

For more information visit: www.asianart.org

South Korean Gangnam Style K-Pop Comes to San Francisco – A Locally-Produced Video

Thursday, September 13th, 2012

[Wow, touchy touchy we are, huh?]

Here is a video:

Please note that a total of five “fucking haters” unliked this vid on the YouTube. Can you imagine?

Here is the original version.

And here is Pyongyang Style.

And here is the Oregon Duck version.

Hopefully none of these words will offend any of the tens of thousands of art students who populate the 415…

And oh, here is info on BART

And MUNI.

America’s Cup Confidential: “Team Korea” Has Exactly Zero Koreans On It – How Does That Make Any Sense?

Tuesday, August 21st, 2012

Answer: It doesn’t.

Let’s meet the team – there’s a white boy, a white boy, a white boy, a white boy, and a white boy:

Click to expand

Hey, why don’t they call themselves Team North Korea, cause, you know, that would be just as accurate.

Or, indeed, Team Kyrgyzstan, you know, whatever.

(There was an idea to have actual Koreans on Team Korea. First, it was going to be 30% Korean, and then 15% and then after those proposals got shot down we’re back to the original requirement of 0% Korean. And if you think China Team is Chinese, well…)

Oh what’s that, it’s where the boat was made is what counts? But isn’t this a spec race with all the boats basically the same?

The World Wonders.

Now, speaking of Team Korea, let’s check in:

You’ll note that this Tweet was “promoted” by purported Korean Mark Bulkeley, so that his banal message would go out to more than just his few dozen Followers. One could assume that one Markie B. was paying some hard-earned won or quid or whatever they use for money wherever he’s from or pretends he’s from, but he says he Tweets his unsolicited Tweets at no charge.

Perhaps the City and County of San Francisco is picking up the Tweeting bills of all the “professional sailors” involved in the America’s Cup scrimmage races?

Speaking of which, how much is each Sailor costing San Francisco taxpayers? About $100,000, $200,000 each? It’s like welfare for the “sailing community,” huh?

Speaking of which, isn’t the America’s Cup a big disappointment already? I think it is.

So it’s “NASCAR on the bay” complete with faked incidents for the cameras (like last year’s pitchpole near Alcatraz – that’s the first thing they show on the broadcast that nobody wants to pay for) and yet still nobody’s interested.

OK fine.

P.S. Nobody cares about anything related to the America’s Cup, you’ll see. They had a scrimmage down in San Diego not too long ago and nobody showed. Anyway, this whole deal is kind of a fraud. You’ll see.

OMG, the Giant “Kinetic Red Lotus” Just Arrived at Civic Center – “Phantoms of Asia” Will Open Soon at Our Asian Art Museum

Saturday, May 12th, 2012

The Asian Art Museum Blog has the news about the big new piece that’s just been installed in Civic Center. It’s all a part of Phantoms of Asia: Contemporary Awakens the Past, which starts May 18th, 2012 at the Asian Art Museum.

Here’s the video of them installing it yesterday afternoon:

And here’s what it looked like yesterday evening:

Click to expand

The HuffPo has the story:

“Timed to coincide with the Asian Art Museum‘s Phantoms of Asia exhibition, Civic Center Plaza will soon play host to Korean artist Choi Jeon Hwa’s Breathing Flower sculpture–a 24-foot tall, bright red recreation of a lotus flower with motorized petals set up to open and close throughout the course of the day.

curatorial statement from the Asian Art Museum details some of the meaning behind the work:

“Looking closely at this large lotus by artist Choi Jeong Hwa one notices that it appears to be full of life, its petals slowly inhaling and exhaling. This is typical of the work of Choi, who takes pleasure in giving new life and meaning to otherwise inanimate and disregarded materials. Long a familiar flower in Asia and associated with both Hindu and Buddhist mythology, the lotus is remarkable for its ability to emerge from murky waters and mud, and blossom into an elegant flower. Choi created his lotus from everyday materials that, unlike a real lotus, will never disintegrate and die, and ultimately urge the viewer to meditate on the beauty and fragility of the natural world around us.”