Posts Tagged ‘landmark’

Marquee of Historic BRIDGE THEATRE on Geary Repurposed to Promote Area Supervisor Mark Farrell – Meet Your New Baseball Academy

Friday, November 7th, 2014

This is the scene days after our most recent election – one hopes this promotional effort for the incumbent Supervisor won’t stick around* for too much longer.

In any event, you can never be too careful when your Conditional Use authorization is under such scrutiny.

Hey, guess how many NIMBY’s complained about the Bridge being turned into the brand-new San Francisco Baseball Academy? Zero.**

So, PLAY BALL, somehow, inside of an old 1930′s-style movie house:

20141106_115628 copy

On It Goes…

*It was part of my job to change the marquee at this Landmark-owned theatre, back in the day. That was no picnic. (Another part was to console the owners of cars that had been stolen from our parking lot. Back then, criminals wouldn’t  smash and grab – they’d steal the whole car. Ah mem’ries…)

**It’s the West Side, nobody cares. Target? Bring it. Chipotle? Coming soon, just up the street near Masonic. Combination Pizza Hut And Taco Bell? Maybe someday…

The “Selfie Stick” Arrives in San Francisco – These Tourists Use One to Take Better Photos in Golden Gate Park

Friday, June 27th, 2014

See?

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Well, I know it’s a selfie stick because I seen them using it. In this shot above they are simply reviewing their results.

Actually, I heard about the “selfie stick backlash” afore I ever saw one. We’re moving through Kashmir Hill territory here, from June 2014:

“That is un-f***ing believable,” he said. My Hong Kong friend was surprised by our surprise. “It’s a selfie stick,” she explained. “They’re all over Asia.”

Oh, here’s one, and there are others.

In closing, selfie stick – it’s a thing!

Or, if you’d prefer, Selfie-Stick Fever – Catch It!

Oh let the sun beat down upon my selfie-stick, stars to fill my dream 
I am a traveler of both time and space, to be where I have been 
To pose for selfies with the gentle race, this world has seldom seen 
They talked for days of my new iPhone 6, and all will be revealed 

Oh Wow: Tony Robles, Former Doorman at the Pricey Presidio Landmark Apartments, Unloads in the Pages of Poor Magazine

Friday, February 3rd, 2012

Oh wow, man. Former Presidio Landmark Apartments doorman Tony Robles tells his tale in Poor Magazine (aka Prensa Pobre).

Alls I can say is that it’s an interesting mix of fact and opinion. One of the first grafs is below and the whole thing is in the link above.

Anyway, I guess a lot more people are living there these days – here’s what’s on Yelp about this building.

And here’s the place itself, way on the right, from the deck of one of those nearby multi-floor townhomes:

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Here it is:

“The edifice I refer to is the Presidio Landmark Apartments, located in the city’s Presidio on Wedemeyer St. near 14th Ave.  I was working at this insular, hermetically sealed, self-aggrandizing, pseudo palace—home to CEO’s and hedge funders—in the capacity of door attendant.  My brown face was the first you’d see when walking through the French doors.  There I would sit, donning a somewhat comical habiliment of tan dockers, innocuous (save for the itching) cotton candy blue shirt, bottomed off with clunky Timberland shoes.  The Presidio Landmark—an ideal locale for one of those obnoxious Lexus Christmas commercials—home to some of the city’s highest rents–nearly $3000 a month for a “junior” one bedroom, $3200-3800 for a one-bedroom, upwards of $4000-5000 for a 2 bedroom, and $7000+ for a multi-floor townhome located in the periphery.  The building casts an ominous presence when approached.  It is situated on a grassy slope, adorned with foliage including succulents, native plants, African varieties—underneath canopy-like palm trees, impassive and pale, stripped of their natural skin.  One gets the impression when approaching this fortress-like structure that something is terribly wrong.  This home of the upwardly mobile, the hedge funders, gentrifiers of neighborhoods—this colonized place sits on the ancestral home of Native people.  It is the structure that was once known as the Merchant Marine and Public Health Service Hospitals.  It was a place that provided free care to native people, including native Hawaiians, people with leprosy, merchant marines and people who didn’t have access to decent healthcare.  It is part of the 42 acre Public Health Service District.  It is the place that was abandoned in the mid 80’s when it was decommissioned by the Reagan administration.  It is a place whose cries can be heard, a place where ancestral spirits cry out for justice against land grabbing developers like Forest City, who, with the Presidio Trust, took the sacred Ohlone land to satisfy its voracious corporate hunger.  The Presidio Landmark: home to the 1%.”

But what’s this, here’s an ad for just $2150, so maybe they’ve lowered their asking prices lately:

*Junior One Bedroom, One Bathroom available for move in 2/8/2012 
*Brand New Luxury Apartment Home 
*Presidio National Park address 
*Beautiful finishes including hardwood floors, granite countertops and stainless steel energy efficient appliances 
*Bosch full-size, in-suite washer and dryer 

Presidio Landmark Features:
LEED Gold Certification 
24-hour Door Attendant
Concierge Services
On-site Maintenance Team 
Massage Room and Spa Services
Private Dining Room with Wine Cellar 
Jacuzzi Hot Tub
Fitness Center/Yoga Room
Beautiful Interior Gardens with Fire Pit and breathtaking views
Parking available at $150/month

Live in luxury at the Presidio Landmark where there is plenty of room to stretch out and enjoy the great outdoors; you will have immediate access to the Marina, Laurel Heights and Presidio Heights. Nowhere else in San Francisco will you find an historic building that has been sustainably renovated with modern comforts and conveniences built right in. Host a private dinner party in our Dining Room or catch the MUNI to the Financial District for a night out. 

And there you have it.

Word From the Street: Bridge Theatre – Open Since 1939 – Melancholia

Wednesday, December 21st, 2011

As seen at 3010 Geary near Blake in the Inner Richmond District: 

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“1 Screen. Built in 1939. Operated by Landmark since 1991. Only one mile west of Japan Town and one mile south of the Presidio, the Bridge Theatre is conveniently and centrally located in the Inner Richmond District. Named after the Golden Gate bridge which was built two years before, it is one of San Francisco’s most beloved single-screen movie palaces, featuring independent films and foreign language cinema since the 1950s.”

San Francisco Film Society Presents the 2011 New Italian Cinema Festival – Nov 13-20 at Embarcadero Ctr. Cinema

Saturday, November 12th, 2011

It’s back! It’s New Italian Cinema from the SFFS.

See?

Image

“November 13–20, 2011
Landmark’s Embarcadero Center Cinema

Celebrating 15 years in San Francisco, New Italian Cinema 2011 offers Opening and Closing Night presentations with work by prominent Italian directors. A three-film tribute to Daniele Luchetti will open the Festival, followed by seven features by up-and-coming directors in the City of Florence competition. The films in this year’s program investigate topics including corporate malfeasance, office politics, rural life and war, as experienced by Italians from every walk of life. Closing Night offers the latest by one of Italy’s most respected filmmakers, Nanni Moretti’s Habemus Papam. A festive Closing Night reception at a nearby restaurantwill finish out the festival.

Download the program (PDF)
New Italian Cinema Sponsors & Supporters

The SFFS has tons of stuff like this going on all the time, year in and year out. Check it:

Anyway, here are two of the Italian films they have coming up and the rest you can see after the jump.

Ci vediamo al teatro! Perche no?

A Quiet Life

Claudio Cupellini
Buried secrets and a criminal past lead the proprietor of a swank hotel in Germany to desperate acts in this powerful drama from the director of Lessons in Chocolate (NIC 2008). When Diego and Eduardo, two young hotheads visiting from Italy on shady business, arrive at Rosario’s establishment, it is soon evident that they want more from him than just a place to lie low. The motivations behind their visit become increasingly fraught on all sides until the hotelier is forced to protect the new life he’s built—at all costs.  Read more…

Sunday, November 13, 1:00 pm; Friday, November 18, 6:30 pm 

Landmark’s Embarcadero Center Cinemas

The First Assignment

Giorgia Cecere
In 1950s Puglia, headstrong young Nena is sent to a mountain village many miles away for her first teacher placement. Unhappily leaving her wealthy boyfriend behind, she faces a scruffy set of undereducated pupils and a group of locals suspicious of outsiders. With a style that tells the story visually rather than verbally, this is a moving portrait of an independent woman attempting to overcome the restrictions places against her.  Read more…

Sunday November 13, 3:45 pm; Saturday November 19, 6:30 pm 

Landmark’s Embarcadero Center Cinemas

The Pigeon-Feeders of Mid-Market: No Wonder Our Hibernia Bank, That Brokedown Palace, Has Bird Issues

Thursday, November 3rd, 2011

Well this is what happens at our shut-down Hibernia Bank (Landmark #130) at Jones, McAllister and Market these days – pigeon poo blocks drainage and then that starts a process that causes parts of the building to rain down on the sidewalk.

Thusly:

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Anywho, here’s your #1 pigeon-feeding crew – here’s your problem. They attract hundreds all at once:

Just saying…

San Francisco’s Presidio Once Again Wins Preservation Design Awards: Officer’s Club and Landmark Projects

Tuesday, October 4th, 2011

All the deets, below.

Via Presidio Trust

“PRESIDIO TAKES HOME TWO PRESTIGIOUS PRESERVATION DESIGN AWARDS
OFFICERS’ CLUB AND PRESIDIO LANDMARK PROJECTS HONORED

Presidio of San Francisco (October 4, 2011) — An innovative approach to historic preservation of the Presidio’s historic Officers’ Club has earned the Presidio Trust a Preservation Design award from the California Preservation Foundation (CPF). The award in the Culture Resources Studies and Reports category was one of two the Trust received at the CPF’s 28TH annual awards ceremony Saturday night. The rehabilitation of the Presidio Landmark was also honored in the Preservation category. These projects were among 27 winners in nine categories statewide.

It is the third consecutive year the Trust has earned a Preservation Design Award.

“It is a great honor to receive these awards from the California Preservation Foundation,” said Craig Middleton, the Trust’s executive director. “We take great pride in preserving the historic fabric and character of the Presidio and it is extremely gratifying when those efforts are recognized by an organization such as the CPF.”

The award for its Non-Destructive Evaluation Report, honors the Trust’s ground-breaking use of technology in preservation of the adobe walls inside the historic Officers’ Club. Using thermal imaging technology, similar to that used by fire departments to find hot spots or people in trapped in burning buildings, the Trust was able to map moisture levels and cavities inside the walls without having to drill into them or tear them down. Guided by these “maps” crews are now able to repair the walls using new adobe bricks.
“This is true preservation and conservation at its best and it’s exciting that the California Preservation Foundation has recognized that with their award,” says Christian Wallace a Project Manager for Planning and Historical Rehabilitation with the Trust.

The oldest and most loved building in the Presidio, and the oldest in San Francisco, the Officers’ Club is undergoing a complete rehabilitation that includes the repair and restoration of all significant historic spaces, the construction of new exhibit space and event venues, and seismic upgrades and improvements to enhance accessibility for people with disabilities. Work is scheduled to be completed late next year and the project is expected to receive a LEED gold certification from the U.S. Green Building Council.

While the award is a first for the rehabilitation of the Officers’ Club, it is the sixth award for the Presidio Landmark project since its completion in July, 2010 and comes on the heels of a Gold Level Building Design+Construction, Reconstruction Award. The Presidio Landmark awards recognize the Trust, and its partner, Forest City Development, for the rehabilitation of the former Public Health Service Hospital and its transformation into 154 residential apartments.

The Trust and its partners in historic rehabilitation have now won a total of seven Preservation Design Awards since 2000. Past winners include:

Ø 2010 Cultural Resource Study Award—for the Cultural Landscape of the Presidio’s Fort Scott
Ø 2009 Rehabilitation (Large Category) Award—for the rehabilitation of a former army airplane hangar for La Petite Baleen, a children’s swim school
Ø 2009 Craftsman/Preservation Technology Award—for the restoration of the Presidio’s historic Arguello Gate
Ø 2006 Rehabilitation Award—for the rehabilitation of an historic warehouse for Senspa, a stunning day spa
Ø 2000 Rehabilitation Award—for the rehabilitation of the Presidio Fire Station

Founded in 1977, the California Preservation Foundation is a non-profit organization dedicated to the preservation of California’s diverse cultural and architectural heritage. With over 1,500 members it is the leading voice for historic preservation in the state. Since 1984 the foundation’s highly competitive Preservation Design Awards program has honored exceptional historic preservation projects for excellence in design, construction, planning and technology.

The Presidio Trust was established by the United States Congress in 1996 to administer the Presidio of San Francisco, an urban national park site located at the base of the Golden Gate Bridge. The Presidio is one of the largest and most ambitious historic preservation projects underway in the United States. The Presidio’s historic buildings represent the nation’s most comprehensive collection of military architecture, dating from the Civil War through the Cold War, including homes and barracks that reflect how the military social hierarchy and domestic life evolved in the Presidio. Since 1994, approximately 75 percent of the park’s historic structures have been rehabilitated for new uses. The Trust has won numerous awards for planning and historic preservation.”

Coit Tower Goes Red, White, and Blue for the 10th Anniversary of 9/11: Looks Like a Giant Firecracker Popsicle

Sunday, September 11th, 2011

Another Great Capture from Whole Wheat Toast.

It goes cherry, white lemon, blue raspberry:

Via Whole Wheat Toast - click to expand

Just like a Popsicle Firecracker, non?

Did you know that the first popsicle was made in San Francisco by 11-year-old on a freezing night in 1905?

Frank W. Epperson invented the Popsicle on an extraordinarily cold night in San Francisco 

No sir, did not know that. Thanks Wiki!

What’s Up With Battery Caulfield Road in the Presidio – Have the Feds Closed It Yet? A Premature Road Sign

Thursday, August 11th, 2011

Well here’s what the 15th Avenue Entrance to the Presido looks like these days.

See that? It’s for bikes only now – cars need to use 14th Avenue: 

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Which is as expected, fine.

But what’s up with this new sign with the garbage bag over it?

This is right outside of the Presidio Landmark Apartments* on infamous Battery Caulfield Road

I was bold enough to take a peek under the garbage bag. It said something like “Road Closed 110 Feet.”

Oh noes!

I haven’t heard of any conflict yet, so assume that this sign is not currently operational.

Speaking of which, here’s part of the actual Battery Caulfield, AFAIK – it was a Nike Missile base, your know, for the Russian Bear Bombers and whatnot. They stored the Nikes horizontal and then would open the pod bay doors to fire. And you can see the flat top of Mount Sutro in the background – that’s where the fire control base was for the SAMs of the Presidio, back in the day:

Anyway, wazzup with BC Road closing? I gots to know.

*Speaking of which, just look – cars in the parking lot. Personally, I wouldn’t pay four figures a year just to park in the West Bay, but that’s how they do it these days. Anyway, my point is that, unlike last year, there are people actually living in the Presidio Landmark. It took a while, and the looky-lou’s were pissed off that they had to apply for an appointment just to check things out, but the joint probably doesn’t feel like the hotel from The Shining anymore.

OMG, Signs of a Renaissance at Our “Second Renaissance Revival” Federal Building at 50 Fulton – Hurray!

Wednesday, August 10th, 2011

OMG, it’s “Loin Stimulus,” finally.

These days, there are signs of life at the old Bakewell & Brown Federal Building at 50 Fulton. (Or “50 United Nations Plaza.” Why put the name of that failure all over the place? Yish. The address is 50 Fulton, IRL, right?)

See the workers up there? 

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It’s what the Feds call “Recovery in Progress – Working for you. Working for San Francisco.” Gee, thanks, Feds!*

Groove on the architecture.

Looks nice from the inside:

Now, don’t get me started on Lawrence Halprin‘s failed United Nations Plaza, the Mistake by the Lake built atop Yerba Buena Cemetery:

“Halprin was the creative force behind the interactive, ‘playable’ civic fountains most common in the 1970s, an amenity which continues to greatly contribute to the pedestrian social experience in Portland Oregon, where “Ira’s Fountain” is loved and well-used, and which has been a chronic failure at the transient-ridden United Nations Plaza in San Francisco.”

And UN Plaza made the Hall of Shame. Oh well.

All the deets about 50 Fulton:

Significant events

1927: Congress approves $2.5 million for new San Francisco Federal Building
1930: City of San Francisco donates site for building
1934-1936: Building constructed
1975: United Nations Plaza construction commences
1987: San Francisco Civic Center designated a National Historic Landmark
2007: Building vacated
[edit]Building facts

Location: 50 United Nations Plaza
Architect: Arthur Brown, Jr.
Construction Dates: 1934-1936
Architectural Style: Second Renaissance Revival
Landmark Status: Designated a National Historic Landmark as a Contributing Building to the San Francisco Civic Center
Primary Material: Granite
Prominent Features:
Classical Facade with Upper-story Colonnade
Ornate Entrance Vestibule, Lobby, and Elevator Lobby
Naval Commandant’s Office

*Thanks for finally doing something with your aging hulk of a brokedown palace after all these years.