Posts Tagged ‘legal’

Slacklining Hippies Use Bud Light Suitcase Cardboard to Protect Tree in Golden Gate Park

Wednesday, June 10th, 2015

Sort of.

The cardboard looks a little low to me:

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Is this a good thing or a bad thing? IDK

Is this a legal thing or an illegal thing? IDK.

Le mise-en-scene:

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Barely Legal: Are These Freeway-Legal Vespas in the Slow Lane of the Bay Bridge or are they Merely “Motorized Bicycles?”

Thursday, May 28th, 2015

I’m thinking that these are Vespas, or similar, with engines displacing 150 cc’s, or more, so that would make them legal (barely) on CA freeways:

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Even so, they were struggling going uphill, it looked like.

May all your lives be semi-charmed, at the very least…

The Drone Bros of Golden Gate Park: Whose Drone is Hovering Three Feet from Your Bathroom Window on Fell Street? This Dude’s

Tuesday, May 26th, 2015

Here’s the scene without any arrows pointing things out:

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And here are the arrows:

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And here are the bros:

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Now it could be that bro was just checking out his own pad using his new toy, but man, some people might have been surprised if they saw this drone hovering just outside their windows.

The drone slowly increased altitude to rooftop level and I didn’t stick around to see where it went next.

This is How We Live in 2015…

The SFMTA’s Current Approach to Bikes in the Broadway Tunnel Doesn’t Seem Better Than the Old Approach

Tuesday, May 19th, 2015

After years of work and study…

BROADWAY TUNNEL BICYCLE PROJECT: Staff has sent a work order to
the Signal Shop to have the bicycle symbol flash when turned on. (No
updates)

…this the result, eastbound – a blank, nonsensical, K-Mart-looking diamond what lights up when cyclists are sensed in the BT:

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The old method of alerting drivers was similar, but it actually made sense to drivers when it wasn’t operating.

(The SFMTA seems to think that dreaming up crazy new ideas is its obligation – if you’ve never seen things before anywhere else in the world, that’s proof that the SFMTA is showing “leadership,” apparently)

Now here it is when it’s actually working, which I’ve never seen before, courtesy of Google Maps (from the northern lane – G gives you a choice):

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The big issue is how to handle bikes in the tunnel.

My method, westbound, from Chinesetown, is to walk the bike unless I see the rare ped, and then I dismount and stop while the ped passes me. In practice, this usually means riding all the way through. I think this is agin the current rules, but I don’t think I’m risking getting a ticket or anything.

Now eastbound is a different story, since the grade is generally working your way. The technique is to wait for a wave of traffic to go through and then enter when drivers idle at the red at Larkin. You’ll have a few cars pass you, but that’s better than just blithely ignoring traffic the way most do. Or, you can just ride on the sidewalk, remembering that you’re a second-class citizen when doing so.

Anyway, it seems that the generally dull-witted SFMTA is sophisticated enough to understand that going east and west is different thang here, so that’s good.

So do we want to encourage people to ride through this tunnel? IDK. I’ll tell you, westbound, uphill on the Geary Tunnel is worse and the Stockton Tunnel is way better.

I don’t know what the options are at the Broadway Tunnel. I’m sure most of them are very expensive…

The Illegal-Appearing Motorized Scooters of the Golden Gate Park Panhandle Bike Path

Wednesday, May 13th, 2015

What powers this ride? The gasoline? Maybe, but this safety-oriented piloti doesn’t look the rebel rebel type.

OTOH, where’s the battery if this rig is all-electric? I know not.

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Compare all this with a legal all-electric bike rider ebikefan, whose mellow gets harshed by a mean-spirited hippie:

Encounter with ignorant E-Bike hater in San Francisco [HD] ebikefan

Success continues to elude the A2B electric bike people. I’ll tell you, most of the people in town you see on these e-bikes are somehow affiliated with the company itself, believe it or not. Something like $5000 is too too much for what these bikes are, but the other problem is that I wouldn’t want one if they gave me one for free.* I suppose if you’d paid me to ride one about and take charge of its safekeeping and lug it up and down stairs, well then I’d think about it. And if I accepted your deal, I’d be just like most of the other A2Ber’s in town, like, apparently, ebikefan, getting paid to operate an A2B…

*So don’t give me this oh, well, if you can’t afford a premium bike stuff. An A2B might be fun for Jay Leno to collect and have to gather dust in one of his garages (I’m seriously, I think he has one), but there’s a reason why they’re not popular…

White Over Raspberry – The Smartest-Looking GO-4 Intercepter Three-Wheeler in Town – But Is This Legal?

Wednesday, April 22nd, 2015

San Francisco, in particular, has an active meter-maid-motoring community.”

Can you legally perpendicular park your Frisco Family Car in a parallel parking area?

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I know not.

This kind of thing is agin the rules if you used a four-wheeled SmartCar, but SF could have special rules for three wheelers…

Lawyer’s Corner: RPD Says Slacklines and Hammocks Violate the Park Code, But Do They Really?

Friday, April 10th, 2015

Here you go, this was just the other day in GGP:

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RPD calls this kind of thing “affixing items to trees” on their newish signs, but I don’t see where this language comes from, you know, in the SF Park Code.

So yeah, if you cut down a big tree to have some fun with the stump, I can see how that’d be citeable.

But I don’t see how slacklining or romantic hammocking is an automatic violation of the SF Park Code.

So, I’m saying the newish signs from RPD are incorrect.

So I’m saying that the RPD should go to the BOS to fix this sitch,

JMO

Frisco Traffic – Big Wheel Up Front, Tiny Wheel Out Back – Are Pennyfarthings Legal on the Streets of San Francisco?

Thursday, April 9th, 2015

IDK. These rides certainly were not legal on CA streets a while back, but I’d have to look up what the current law says, something about being able to skid a wheel on dry pavement.

Anyway, here you go, in the Golden Gate Park Panhandle:

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Dorsal view:

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Well, Now the SFMTA / MUNI _LIKES_ the State of Israel – Of Course, SFGov Could Stop These Ads, But $$$

Thursday, March 19th, 2015

Options, all kinds of options:

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Once Again, the “Respect The Neighborhood” Millionaire Homeowners of the Western Addition Get It Wrong: “POST NO SIGNS…”

Friday, March 13th, 2015

Here you go, a RESPECT THE NEIGHBORHOOD notice in the Western Addition.

This isn’t a named part of the Western Addition I don’t think – it’s a bit east of the NoPA and the Alamo Square, but the NIMBY mentality is just the same as in those microhoods of the WA.

Legally, this is WRONG WRONG WRONG:

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And now it’s time for IRL

The public may post information on some utility poles if the postings follow regulations outlined in Article 5.6 of the Public Works Code. The law was adopted to ensure that flyers posted on public property do not contribute to litter or blight. Illegal postings in the public right of way may be removed by DPW’s Bureau of Street Environmental Services and are subject to fines from $100 to $500.  Call 311 to report.

Signs are defined as any card, decoration, poster, campaign sign, or any object containing or bearing writing that is affixed, posted or fastened to a utility or light pole that is permanently attached to the street or sidewalk.  Signs do not include handbills, banners or A-Frame boards. Bulletin boards designed for neighborhood postings are exempt from this regulation.

Signs attached to buildings and on private property are regulated by Part II Chapter I of the Building Code and violationsshould be reported to the Department of City Planning’s Code Enforcement or call 311 to report.

Tips for Legally Posting Signs on Public Property

To legally place a sign on a utility pole, it must:

Be less than 11 inches in height

No higher than 12 feet from the ground

Conform to the shape of the pole

Be attached with tape or other non-adhesive material such as twine, string or other non-metal banding material

Include a legible posting date in the lower right hand corner

Be removed after 10 days, if the sign is promoting a date specific event

Be removed within 70 days of the posting date

Not be installed on historic street light poles*, traffic signal poles or traffic directional sign poles.

* Historic street light poles are on these streets:

Market Street from 1 Market to 2490 Market

Mission Street from 16th Street to 24th Street

Grant Avenue from Bush Street to Broadway Street

The Embarcadero from King Street to Jefferson Street

Lamp Posts on Fisherman’s Wharf from Hyde to Powell

Howard Street from 3rd Street to 4th Street

Lamp Posts within Union Square

Mason Street from Market to Sutter

Sutter Street from Mason to Kearny

Kearny Street from Bush to Market”