Posts Tagged ‘light’

Richmond San Rafael Bridge with Two Islands: One You Can Buy and One You Can Rent

Friday, April 28th, 2017

Buy on the left and Rent on the right.

As seen from mainland Frisco:

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Abbey Road 2017, If Abbey Road were Filled with Frisco’s Distracted Pedestrians

Monday, April 3rd, 2017

Poor bike rider had to slow down and go around this gaggle, which crossed about 20 seconds early* (or 30 seconds late depending on how you look at it.)

This is fairly typical.

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I am not an elected official and I don’t work for an agency headed by somebody who can be fired by an elected official, so my thinking is unaffected by ze politique.

So I won’t ever tell you, “Gosh darnit, I gotta believe that we’ll achieve Vision Zero 2024 under the leadership of [person who appointed me/person who could unemploy me in about five minutes].”

*So I’m saying they didn’t enter the intersection under a green or even a flashing red DON’T WALK**.

**Starting across when you see the DON’T WALK is still illegal behavior in Cali, but not in NYC, where DON’T WALK means SURE, GO AHEAD AND WALK these days due to a recent change…

Stained Glass: Our Conservatory of Flowers by Day, Our Conservatory of Flowers by Night

Wednesday, March 8th, 2017

Purple orange red green:

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Butterflies and Blooms runs through June 30th, 2017.

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SFPD LIDAR Enforcement, 4th and Fulton

Monday, November 28th, 2016

The signs say RADAR ENFORCED, but the new thing is LIDAR:

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Pyramid Power, 94117

Tuesday, November 22nd, 2016

The largest bike light I’ve ever seen, in all my years:

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A Crazy New SFMTA Plan to Allow Bike Riders to Run Red Lights on Fell and Oak in the “Panhandle-Adjacent” Area

Tuesday, October 4th, 2016

Here it is: The “Fell and Oak Streets Panhandle-Adjacent Bikeway Feasibility Study”

The basic idea is to take out one of the four lanes of Fell and one of the four lanes of Oak along the Golden Gate Park Panhandle from the Baker Street DMV to Stanyan and turn them into dedicated bike lanes.

You don’t need to even look at the report to know that this idea is “feasible” – obviously, our SFMTA can do this if it wants to:

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But why does the SFMTA want to do this? This is not stated in the report.

As things stand now, you can ride your bike on the left side of the left lanes of Fell and Oak, or on the right sides of the right lanes of Fell and Oak, or in any part of any lane of Fell and Oak if you’re keeping up with traffic (but this is especially hard to do heading uphill on Fell), or on the “multi-use pathway” (what I and most people call the bike path) what winds through the Panhandle.

So, why not widen the bike path again, SFGov? It used to be 8 foot wide and now it’s 12 foot wide, so why not go for 16 foot wide? (Hey, why doesn’t our SFMTA simply take over Rec and Park? You know it wants to.)

My point is that it would also be “feasible” to somehow force RPD to widen the current bike path (and also the extremely bumpy, injury-inducing Panhandle jogging/walking path along Oak) independent of whatever the SFMTA wants to do to the streets.

Anyway, here’s the news – check out page 12 of 13. No bike rider (or what term should I use this year, “person with bikes?” Or “person with bike?” Or “person with a bike?”) is going to want to sit at a red light at a “minor street” when s/he could just use the bike trail the SFTMA figures, so why not just allow them to ride on Fell and Oak without having to worry about traffic lights at all? And the pedestrians? Well, you’ll see:

“Minor Street Intersections

The minor cross-streets in the project area from east to west are Lyon Street, Central Avenue, Ashbury Street, Clayton Street, Cole Street, and Shrader Street. Each is a consistent width of 38’-9” curb-to-curb with 15-foot wide sidewalks. All of these streets are discontinued [Fuck man. How much colledge do you need to start talking like this, just asking] at the park, each forming a pair of “T” intersections at Oak and Fell streets. The preferred control for the protected bike lane at these “T” intersections is to exclude it from the traffic signal, allowing bicyclists to proceed through the intersection without stopping unless a pedestrian is crossing the bikeway. Due to the relatively low pedestrian volumes at these intersections, it is expected that people using the protected bike lane [aka cyclists? aka bike riders?] would routinely violate the signal if required to stop during every pedestrian phase, creating unpredictability and likely conflict between users on foot and on bicycles. This treatment also recognizes that in order to attract many bicycle commuters, the new protected bike lanes would need to be time-competitive with the existing multi-use path that has the advantage of a single traffic control signal for the length of the Panhandle.

Excluding the protected bike lane from the traffic signal requires installing new pedestrian refuge islands in the shadow of the parking strip. The existing vehicle and pedestrian signal heads currently located within the park would also need to be relocated to new poles on the pedestrian refuge islands.

Implementing these changes would cost between $70,000 and $150,000 per intersection, and require the removal of approximately four parking spaces per intersection. Over the eleven minor-street “T” intersections along the Panhandle (excluding Fell Street/Shrader Street which which has been discussed separately), the total cost would be between $0.9 and $1.5 million dollars and approximately 48 parking spaces would be removed.

This design introduces a variety of benefits and compromises [“compromises!” Or maybe “costs,” as in a cost/benefit analysis?] for pedestrians crossing to and from the park at the minor intersections:

Pedestrians would be required to wait for gaps in bicycle traffic to cross the protected bike lane (which may present new challenges to people with low or no vision). Design treatments for the protected bike lanes (e.g., stencil messages, rumble strips, signs) should also be considered to clearly indicate the necessity of yielding to pedestrians to people on bicycles.”

How to Get Free Electricity from SFGov – One Simple Trick – As Seen on Market in the Financh

Monday, July 11th, 2016

This scene is about ten yards south of the slot, but I consider it part of The Financial District:

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Perhaps Dude is from New Yawk.

Don’t stop believin’
Hold on to that feelin’
Streetlight people
Don’t stop believin’
Hold on
Streetlight people
Don’t stop believin’
Hold on to that feelin’
Streetlight people

The Advisability of Riding Your Bike Through the Bunker Road Tunnel Whether the Light is Green or Not

Tuesday, June 28th, 2016

Here it is, your Bunker Road Tunnel* to Rodeo Beach and beyond.

The driver of this old Datsun(!) pickup truck seemed to be giving this cyclist a little bit of room, but then a shout came out…

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…from this guy going the other way. So whoops, the Datsun driver moves a yard or two to the right. Thusly:

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Bikes have dedicated lanes in this tunnel but cars don’t. Does that mean that bikes don’t have to wait up to five minutes for a green light the way cars have to? I know not. The surfer dudes in the 4WD pickup could not possibly look more like Marin Locals, like Regulars on this stretch of road, but the driver was surprised to see a cyclist going the other way? Now because it’s a tunnel, shouting works, but what if dudes had had the radio on and couldn’t hear? There could have been an accident.

Seems that waiting for the green would be safer. There’s room for debate, I suppose. (I think I’d want to see a sign saying it’s OK for bikes to proceed afore I ran a red light…)

EPILOGUE:

A single-lane tunnel carries Bunker Road from the Rodeo Valley to U.S. 101. Built in 1918, this tunnel is known as Baker-Berry Tunnel but also known as the Bunker Road Tunnel or the Five Minute Tunnel. A date stamp on the western entrance to the Baker-Barry Tunnel lists 1994, which may have been the year the tunnel was retrofitted for earthquake protection or reconstructed for other reasons. Additional work was completed in 2013 to allow for wider approaches for bicyclists. A traffic signal governs the flow of traffic into the tunnel, since only one direction may proceed at a time.

*Some mock the Yelp for rating a tunnel:

“Solid four-star tunnel… Screw you, Yelp.”

“What can I say, it’s a hole in the ground..lol”

Years of SFPD Enforcement Have Gotten Through to These Bros – More Respect for Pedestrian Red Lights on Market

Wednesday, May 25th, 2016

Five or ten years ago, these very same dudes might very well have pretty much ignored this red light for the giant crosswalk connecting Union Square with San Francisco Centre, but now they obey the red, pretty much.

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Marketing USF: “OUR AFTER-SCHOOL PROGRAM IS CALLED SILICON VALLEY”

Wednesday, May 11th, 2016

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A Banner Day for USF

Three hundred banners are spreading the good word about USF on the streets of San Francisco.

They feature 12 different vignettes with slogans like “Change the World From Here” and “Our After-School Program is Called Silicon Valley,” and are meant to enhance USF’s visibility in the city, showcase its diversity, and connect USF with the city’s booming tech industry.

The banners hang from light poles along major city streets and in high-traffic neighborhoods like SOMA, Civic Center, Mission Bay, and the Sunset. 

They were installed in October and will remain on display through April 2016.”