Posts Tagged ‘limit’

How To Obstruct Traffic on the 101: By Driving the 35 MPH Speed Limit, on a Freeway

Thursday, September 15th, 2016

101 South, a 35 MPH freeway:

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The Speed Limit on Western JFK Drive in Golden Gate Park is No Longer Just 10 MPH – “SLOW DOWN”

Monday, August 29th, 2016

IDK, maybe somebody hacked this sign to say what it says. Regardless, this is a big improvement over the 10 MPH sign it used to be just a few days back:

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More changes are coming for this area, before 2017, to prevent you from using JFK the way you’re used to…

The Speed Limit on a Stretch of JFK Drive is Now 10 MPH

Tuesday, August 16th, 2016

This official “SLOW TO 10 MPH” sign was up near Speedway Meadow during Outside Lands 2016, but it’s still there now long after OL’s blown town:

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The limit goes back up to 25 MPH near 30th Avenue?

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(This trailer doesn’t “see” bikes, AFAIK, unlike some others.)

Changes to the “access” we have to JFK are coming soon, but I don’t know what they are and if this is a part of it.

Our Presidio sometimes records license plate numbers and checks timestamps to see who’s “cutting through” the park (instead of having the Presidio as a destination in itself). The Presidio People think “Cut Through Traffic” is evil, but really, all traffic is cut-through traffic to somebody. Oh well.

If SFGov wants people to use Fulton instead of JFK, there will be some problems with that…

Panhandle Bike Path: Aggressive Local Roadies vs. Bunched-Up, Lollygagging Tourists – A Bicycle Freeway or Promenade?

Wednesday, April 6th, 2016

You know what’s odd? We have the ability to count cyclists (oh, I’m sorry, PEOPLE ON BIKES or PEOPLE WITH BIKES instead, to use the proper post-2015 “framing,” you know, to influence your opinion, you know, subconsciously) but not to how fast they’re speeding downhill on our Panhandle Bike Path.

Hey, what’s the speed limit on this path? Oh, no signs posted. Hey, how fast can a roadie get coming inbound on skinny high-PSI tires, downhill, and with the prevailing tailwind? IDK, 25 MPH pretty easily?

Anyway, here’s the group of slow slow tourists heading east. They didn’t have much respect for the lane lines, as you can see:

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And these two guys passed them going the other way. One was obviously irate. He was all, “USE YOUR HEADS, USE YOUR BRAINS!”

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IDK, man. I get his point about the tourists, but I think his expectations of the Panhandle Bike Path are too high. IMO, we all need to look out for others…

19th Avenue is the New Alternative to Poorly Designed and Administered Sunset Boulevard, Believe It Or Not

Wednesday, October 21st, 2015

Here it is, 19th Avenue in the Sunset / Parkside, with traffic going about 38-40 MPH through green light after green light in sections marked for 30 MPH:

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Historically, Sunset has been the alternative to congested 19th, but things have changed lately. Of course, Sunset was a bad idea, a big wide boulevard with pointless medians up the yingyang. The question now is what to do about it.

Oh well.

Tour de France, Tour de Manche – Pedaling Downhill Through the Golden Gate Park Panhandle as Fast as You Can – Why?

Thursday, July 23rd, 2015

Just asking, Bro.

What’s the speed limit on the Panhandle bike path? What should it be?

How fast do you think you can go heading west downhill on this bike path, with you out of the saddle, on your expensive lightweight bike, with skinny high-pressure tires, with your muscular thighs, with a strong tailwind? Bro, you’re going faster than anyone – what’s the point? You’re at the 99th percentile, or 99.9th, something like that, right?

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By this point, Bro wasn’t pedaling no mo, ’cause he prolly could see that traffic on Masonic was going to slow his progress anyway. But he wasn’t racing for a light, he was racing along for no apparent reason. Strava, perhaps?

Realize that this path passes over what functions as the sidewalks of Cole, Clayton, Ashbury, etc.

Should SFGov post speed limit signs? Mmmm…

Hey, you know what’s funny? Some people want, effectively, to kick peds off this Panhandle multi-use trail. “Go use the pedestrian path on the south side of the Panhandle [near Oak]” they say.

Is that the right way to look at things?

I think not.

Anyway, that’s the ‘sperpective of somebody who uses bikes to get around, as opposed to using bikes to race around…

The Traffic Speedometers the SFMTA Installed on Masonic Don’t Work Very Well

Wednesday, August 20th, 2014

Masonic is a crazy street with a crazy history. Like, 4 Masonic is more than 1000 feet away from 5 Masonic, for instance – what’s up with that? And on the other end of this street, up around the 1000 block, well, that’s where mayoral wives have lived, like Blanche Brown, you know, our First Lady up until ten years ago, the woman  that most people in town weren’t aware of, and, more recently, Jennifer Newsom, who moved away to Marin just months after husband Gavin was hectoring families to NOT move to Marin County, oh well.

Anyway, there have been three pedestrian / cyclist deaths on Masonic* in recent memory, so that’s part of the reason why the SFMTA installed a pair of speedometers to tell drivers how fast they’re going.

The problem is that they don’t work very well.

Like here. Moments before, it was indicating 24 MPH, but then it jumped up to 32 MPH all of a sudden for no reason. All the cars were moving about the same pace uphill and there was no traffic traveling down the hill:

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Speaking of which, the speedometer for traffic heading downhill is even less accurate. Sometimes it’s spot-on, sometimes it wildly optimistic, and other times it’s blank.

What’s the value in these speedometers if they don’t work?

Oh what’s that, MUNI / SFMTA? You don’t care, because you’ve moved on to other things?

Oh, OK.

*Two were due to very drunk drivers, who both kept on going (one ended up crashing into St. Mary’s and the other got busted near USF) and the other was due to a Trader Joe’s shopper jaywalking across Masonic north of Geary – this kind of jaywalking still happens hundreds of times a day even now.

A $23 Cap on Parking Tickets? Could San Francisco Survive Something Like the “Los Angeles Parking Freedom Initiative”

Monday, June 16th, 2014

Read the news and turn the pages, from the LA TImes:

“The Los Angeles Parking Freedom Initiative wants to cap fines at $23 for violations that don’t affect public safety.”

Mmmm…

[CALL:] Hey, could an initiative like this pass in San Francisco County?

[RESPONSE:] Hell to the yes.

Could the SFMTA handle the loss of revenue?

I suppose. But it would turn a solid money-maker – paying well-compensated PCO’s to run around all over the city – into a decided money-loser.

Mmmmm…

Nice Video: “Brakeless in San Francisco” – Two Bros Bike Down Upper Conzelman Without Brakes – Ends in a Crash

Tuesday, November 27th, 2012

A mild crash, that is.

Going down the one-way part of Conzelman on Hawk Hill in Marin County USA:

OMG, San Jose Has a Skyline That You Can See From SF – City Hall, Bank of America Building – They’re Just Like Us!

Tuesday, November 29th, 2011

Well this is the view you can get from Buena Vista Park in the middle of San Francisco.

That’s world-famous* Candlestick Park, Home of the 49ers and the Gold Rush, in the foreground, and in the background camera left is the City of San Jose, California’s third-largest and the Capitol of the Bay Area:

Click to expand, of course

Now I know what you’re thinking, you’re thinking, “Enhance that image.”

Well here you go, it’s downtown San Jose with all those tall buildings. See? It’s San Jose City Hall, “The 88” residential building (which is actually only 87 meters high but let’s not dwell** on that), the Bank of America Building (nee Bank of Italy) from 1926, and the “Knight Ridder Building” (per Google Earth, I don’t know what they call it these days).

Oh, and somewhere in the mix there’s also Mineta San José International Airport – Silicon Valley’s Airport and the San Mateo Bridge and the Dumbarton Bridge.***

Anyway, I didn’t know San Jose had a skyline what you can see from the 415.

But don’t look for it to get any easier to spot in the future owing to the fact that that SJC international airstrip is right in the middle of it all and there’s a height limit of 87 meters (I think?) in the area.

So, San Joser has a big, domed City Hall and a tall Bank of America Building and whatnot. They’re just like us!

(Oh, and speaking of the Niners, enjoy our winning football team(s), Santa Clara County.)

*No, not “world-class.” 

**Check it: 

Eighty-eight (88) symbolizes fortune and good luck since the word 8 sounds similar to the word Fā (发, which implies 发财, or wealth, in Mandarin). The number 8 is considered to be the luckiest number of all in Chinese culture and prices in Chinese supermarkets can often be found containing many 8’s (see numbers in Chinese culture). The Chinese government has even been auctioning auto license plates containing many 8s for tens of thousands of dollars. The 2008 Beijing Olympics opened on 8/8/08 at 8 p.m. The shape of the Chinese character for 8 (八) also implies that a person will have a great, wide future as the character starts narrow and gets wider toward the bottom. 88 is used to mean “bye bye”; found in Chinese-language chat, text, SMS, IM. 88 is pronounced in Chinese Mandarin language as “ba ba” (“bā bā” to be precise), simulating the sound of the English language farewell “bye bye”.

And there’s this:

Eighty-eight is used as code among Neo-Nazis to identify each other. H is the 8th letter of the alphabet, so 88 is taken to stand for HH which in turn means Heil Hitler.For example, the number is used in the song “88 rock’n’roll band” by the neo-Nazi group Landser. The late convictedOrder terrorist David Lane wrote “Fourteen Words” and 88 Precepts, and the numbers are often found in combination (1488, 14/88, etc.). This form of the number has inspired the naming of the groups Column 88Unit 88, White Legion 88 and Barselc88. Holocaust museum shooter James von Brunn often signed his writings as “JVB-88.”

***Both of which were featured in the 1992 Robert Redford movie Sneakers. Hurray!

“Redford tries to describe to Strathairn, who is blind, what he heard while in the trunk of a car. He remembers going across a bridge and being in San Francisco it means one of four possible bridges: Golden Gate, Bay Bridge, San Mateo, and the Dumbarton. They rule out the first two and then narrow it down to San Mateo based on the sound and frequency of the seams in the concrete.”