Posts Tagged ‘Liz’

D2 Update: Mark Farrell Declares Victory Over Janet Reilly – Will Meet With Michela Soon – Preparing for Office

Tuesday, November 16th, 2010

[UPDATE: And Janet Reilly just conceded. Read her entire statement after the jump.]

Interesting candidate Mark Farrell has pulled off his upset in District 2. That means that he’ll become a San Francisco Supervisor come January 2011.

Read all about it, below.

Big Mark Farrell (in Giants Orange) y familia at Room 48 in City Hall all the way back in August 2009:

Click to expand

“As of this evening, all the votes have been counted in District 2 by the San Francisco Department of Elections and we have won the District 2 Supervisor election. With tonight’s victory, we now turn our immediate attention to preparing for office in January.  Our transition team is in place, and I will be meeting with District 2 Supervisor Michela Alioto-Pier tomorrow to kick-start the transition process.  I will also finalize the hiring of my City Hall staff within the next week.

I would like to acknowledge and thank all of my opponents – Kat Anderson, Abraham Simmons, Barbara Berwick, Janet Reilly, and Vilma Guinto Peoro – for a very exciting and challenging campaign.  They are dedicated and valued public servants who are each committed to the people and neighborhoods of District 2, and I look forward to working with all of them in the future.

While the past few weeks have been challenging as the vote count continued after Election Day, I fully recognize the need for a transparent and democratic electoral process – as such, I want to thank the leadership and staff of San Francisco’s Department of Elections for their dedication and diligence in completing this difficult task.

I would also like to personally thank all of those individuals that supported my campaign, beginning with Sheriff Michael Hennessey and in particular Supervisor Michela Alioto-Pier and Supervisor Sean Elsbernd. Thank you as well to the organizations which supported my campaign along the way, including the Small Property Owners of San Francisco, Plan C, UA Local 38, BOMA, the District 2 Democratic Club, IBEW Local 1245, the San Francisco Coalition for Responsible Growth and Rescue MUNI.

Thank you to my incredible staff, including Chris Lee, Margaux Kelly, David Latterman and Mark Randolph, and in particular the hundreds of volunteers who poured their time and energy into this campaign – we would not have succeeded without your enthusiasm, and I will be eternally grateful.

Most importantly, thank you to my amazing family – from my wife Liz and our children, to my parents, in-laws and brothers and sisters – we started this journey last year together as a family, and your unconditional support truly carried this campaign across the goal line.

While it was a long campaign and ultimately a close election, I am both honored and excited to represent the residents of District 2, and look forward to working to return common sense, fiscal discipline and neighborhood leadership back to City Hall.”

And here’s what Janet has to say tonight, after the jump.

(more…)

Another Nobel Prize for UC San Francisco – Dr. Elizabeth Blackburn Brings Home the Gold

Monday, October 5th, 2009

Here she is, America’s newest Nobel Prize winner: UCSF‘s Elizabeth H. Blackburn, Ph.D:

blackburn_color2_full copy

They’ll be partying hard today down at the Mission Bay campus. The celebration in Genentech Hall starts in just a few minutes and they’ll have a full-blown news conference this afternoon.

Wow! First Oprah and now this.  

Of course Elizabeth wouldn’t want to leave out her co-winners, so let’s give a shout out to Carol W. Greider of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Jack W. Szostak of Harvard Medical School.

blackburn_lab_full copy

It’s going to be on!

Congratulations to Elizabeth and everybody at the University of California, San Francisco

Fiat Lux, baby!

THE DISCOVERY OF THE TELOMERASE ENZYME

The scientists discovered an enzyme that plays a key role in normal cell function, as well as in cell aging and most cancers.  The enzyme is called telomerase and it produces tiny units of DNA that seal off the ends of chromosomes, which contain the body’s genes. These DNA units – named telomeres—protect the integrity of the genes and maintain chromosomal stability and accurate cell division.  They also determine the number of times a cell divides—and thus determine the lifespan of cells.

Telomerase is pronounced (tel-AH-mer-AZE). Telomere is pronounced (TEEL-oh-mere).

The research sparked a whole field of inquiry into the possibility that telomerase could be activated to treat such age-related diseases as blindness, cardiovascular disease and neurodegenerative diseases, and deactivated to treat cancer, in which the enzyme generally is overactive.

In recent years, Blackburn and colleagues have explored the possibility that life stress, the perception of life stress and lifestyle behaviors could take a toll on telomerase and telomeres. They have reported several studies with human participants, suggesting a correlation. The findings may offer insight, at the cellular level, into the impact of stress on early onset of age-related diseases.

The scientists were named to receive the prize “for the discovery of how chromosomes are protected by telomeres and the telomerase enzyme,” according to the Nobel committee in Stockholm, Sweden.

Evolution of discovery

Blackburn’s road to discovery traces back to 1975 to 1977, when she was a postdoctoral fellow at Yale University. There, working with Joseph Gall, she discovered the unusual nature of telomeres, with their simple, repeated DNA sequences comprising chromosome ends. The work was published in 1978.

With Szostak, she established that these DNA repeats stabilize chromosomes inside cells. They also predicted the existence of an enzyme that would add the sequences to the ends of chromosomes.

In 1985, while a professor at University of California, Berkeley, Blackburn and her then-graduate student Greider reported the discovery of such an enzyme, which they named telomerase. Their research showed that in some organisms, such as the single-celled pond dweller Tetrahymena, telomerase continuously replenishes the chromosome’s telomeric tips. In humans, however, researchers, including Blackburn and her group, showed that telomerase is damped down at certain times in the lives of many types of cells, limiting their ability to self-replenish.

With this discovery, scientists saw the possibility of exploring whether, in humans, the enzyme could be reactivated to prolong cell life to treat age-related diseases, and deactivated to interrupt cancers.

Blackburn joined the UCSF faculty in 1990 and is the Morris Herzstein Endowed Chair in Biology and Physiology in the Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.

She is the fourth UCSF scientist to win the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.
A native of Australia, Blackburn has lived in the United States since 1975, and is a naturalized citizen of the United States as of September 2003.

She lives in San Francisco with her husband, John Sedat, PhD, a professor of biochemistry and biophysics at UCSF. They have one son, Benjamin.

UCSF is a leading university dedicated to promoting health worldwide through advanced biomedical research, graduate-level education in the life sciences and health professions, and excellence in patient care.

LizLand Art Studio Adds Color to Otherwise Drab Clemetina in the SoMA

Friday, June 5th, 2009

Famed local artist Liz Mamorsky has quite a nice building – the  Lizland art studio adds lots of color to this alley in the South of Market Area. Don’t you think?

Click to expand:

img_6476-copy

Note matching Honda.