Posts Tagged ‘long’

Sauce for the Goose: Here It Is, Your Gigantic San Francisco Sheriff Mobile Command Unit – Biggest Ice Cream Truck Ever

Thursday, April 2nd, 2015

As seen in Civic Center last week:

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It’s a giant ice cream truck, with less horsepower than some Honda Accords.

Now the font on the side isn’t comic sans, but it seems a little bit comical to me:

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Didn’t realize we had one of these. Perhaps we received a little Homeland Security money to pay for it, IDK.

I’m sure everybody was impressed at its debutante ball / first “MCU rally” in Sacramento a couple years back.

Next up, Know Your SFPD Command Posts – it’s sauce for the gander:

San Francisco Police Mobile Command One is huge, as you can see…

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…as is Mobile Command Two:

As for Mobile Command Three, well, not so much. Via Bluoz:

That Long Walk Home: What Happens After a Bike Thief Swipes Your Front Wheel in Ed Lee’s San Francisco

Thursday, March 12th, 2015

As seen in Mid-Market:

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Rare Sighting of a Maybach in Frisco – A “Remarkably Clumsy” 20-Foot-Long Car – The Rolling Mistake from Mercedes-Benz

Tuesday, February 3rd, 2015

This thing is so big, it don’t even fit in the viewfinder:

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Now here’s the middle part of it:

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I haven’t seen a Maybach in Frisco since The Aughts. And then there was that time I think I saw another one back in aught-seven, perhaps doing service for our local Consulate General of India.

I’ll tell you, this particular ride above appears to have come straight from Los Angeles. It sure doesn’t belong here.

Anywho, the bones of these failed beasts, these discontinued orphan cars, date to the Reagan era.

All the deets from those Haters at Wiki:

According to Fortune Magazine, after missing out on the chance to purchase Rolls-Royce and Bentley when they were up for sale in the 1990s, “Mercedes backpedaled and decided it needed to be in the ultra-luxury business too, but it went after it in a remarkably clumsy way.” Fortune stated that the first Maybach models had poor driving dynamics compared to its contemporaries from Rolls-Royce and Bentley, as “Mercedes took an aging S-class chassis and plopped an absurdly elongated body on it … rather than develop a new car from the wheels up, as BMW did with Rolls-Royce, or cleverly use the underpinnings of an existing model like the Volkswagen Phaeton for a new Bentley.” Furthermore, Maybachs were never advertised as owner-driven vehicles, as the company believed that the luxury amenities would be sufficient to sell and they even insisted that auto journalists (who usually test drive the vehicle) ride in the backseat.

All right, let’s say ba-bye:

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Training Day: US Coast Guard 47-Foot Motor Life Boat at Mile Rock

Thursday, December 25th, 2014

Semper Paratus:

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Where Do People Regularly Line Up to Get Into a Tiki Bar Four Hours Before Sunset? At the Smuggler’s Cove, 650 Gough

Friday, June 13th, 2014

Doesn’t look like much from the outside, I’ll tell you, but this underground tiki bar certainly is más popular

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Opening bell is at 5:00 PM, so I see this madding crowd every Saturday – perhaps I’ll visit sometime…

TRIGGER WARNING: Eurotrash in the Bay Area

Wednesday, May 21st, 2014

Ppl, I know you think this is cool, but it’s not

Just saying, Frere

Golden Gate Park Panhandle’s Longest Slackline Ever

Thursday, May 15th, 2014

This one went from the a northside tree near the bike path all the way across the Great Meadow to a southside tree near Oak Street:

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For those about to slack, we salute you.


Short Bus – The Smallest Diesel You’ll Ever See from MUNI

Thursday, December 19th, 2013

This bus says, “ELECTRIC POWERED” on the side.

In fact, it’s diesel powered.

But MUNI wants you to like MUNI more, so there you go:

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Hey, speaking of diesel, guess which incompetent local government agency has put more petroleum into the bay than the world-famous Cosco Busan oil spill ship? That’s right, it’s the SFMTA.

Oh look, the feds have a new webpage for the 2009 settlement agreement.


“City and County of San Francisco Clean Water Act Settlement

Settlement Resources

SAN FRANCISCO (November 2, 2009) – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is taking action against the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency following federal violations of the Clean Water Act and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

On the page:

Overview and Location of Facilities

The City and County of San Francisco is a municipality organized under the laws of California that operates the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency (“SFMTA”) and the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (“SFPUC”). The SFMTA operates a diverse fleet of trolley cars, street cars, light rail, alternative fuel vehicles and 495 diesel buses that are serviced and re-fueled at facilities owned and operated by the SFMTA. The SFPUC provides water, wastewater and municipal power services.

Between November and December 2005, approximately 940 barrels (39,488 gallons) of red dye diesel fuel were discharged from one of the Municipality’s underground storage tanks (USTs) at the John M. Woods Motor Coach Facility (Woods Motor Coach Facility). The diesel spread through a piping system into a storm drain, through wastewater collection piping to a pump station, into Islais Creek and eventually San Francisco Bay.

The discharge was caused by a ruptured hose. The leak continued for several days, as sensors, flashers and alarm reports and other leak indicators were ignored. This failure by SFMTA to comply with federal requirements for the management of USTs resulted in the release of diesel fuel and Clean Water Act discharge and pretreatment violations.

After this spill, EPA conducted inspections at several of SFMTA’s facilities and identified violations of EPA’s spill prevention regulations at three of them: Flynn, Kirkland, and Marin.

The five facilities covered by this settlement are in the City and County of San Francisco:

  • Woods Motor Coach Facility – 1095 Indiana Street
  • Flynn Motor Coach Facility – 15th and Harrison Street
  • Kirkland Motor Coach Facility – 151 Beach Street
  • Marin Fuel Stand – 1399 Main Street
  • Southeast Water Collection System Pump Station

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  • Clean Water Act (CWA) Sections 311(b), 301(a), 307(d)
  • Oil Pollution Prevention regulations issued pursuant to CWA Section 311(j )(the Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasure (SPCC) regulations)
  • Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Section 9003(a)

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Injunctive Relief

  • The Consent Decree requires San Francisco to implement an Incident Command System (ICS) Exittraining program.
  • San Francisco must appoint an ICS training coordinator to implement the program.
  • San Francisco employees in certain position categories must complete and renew at least every 2 years, ICS level 100 and 200 training.
  • Other identified employee positions must complete and renew at least every 2 years, ICS level 300 and 400 level training, if they are reasonably expected to coordinate with any Incident Response Management Team.
  • San Francisco must maintain training certification documents and provide them to EPA upon request.
  • San Francisco must also ensure that any contractor, including contractor employees who engage in any aspect of incident response on behalf of San Francisco, have completed the corresponding level of ICS training prior to performing any incident response activity.
  • San Francisco must include language to this effect in any contract regarding incident response.
  • San Francisco must submit an annual report to EPA with information addressing the ICS training program requirements.

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Pollutants Addressed

  • The oil spill of red dye diesel fuel addressed by this settlement discharged at least 940 barrels of oil (39,488 gallons).
  • The oil storage capacity of the facilities addressed by this settlement is a total of 137,500 gallons that are subject to SPCC requirements.
  • For more information about Oil Pollution Prevention rule requirements

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Environmental Effects

The oil spill of red dye diesel fuel addressed by this settlement discharged at least 940 barrels of oil (39,488 gallons). Oil spills are known to cause both immediate and long-term harm to human health and ecosystems. Oil prevents oxygen in water and can suffocate wildlife.

Oil emulsions may stick to the gills of fish or coat and destroy algae or other plankton. Floating oil may reduce water exposure to the circulation of oxygen and, in conjunction with emulsified oil, interfere with photosynthesis.

Oil slicks can kill birds, contaminate food sources, reduce animal and plant reproduction and contaminate nesting habitats. Oil spills can cause long-term effects years later even if the oil remains in the environment for a relatively short period of time.

Petroleum oils can also undergo oxidation and polymerization reactions and can form tars that persist in the environment for years. These harms will be prevented by EPA’s Section 311 enforcement efforts and this settlement agreement. Please see EPA’s Emergency Management pages for more information about the effects of chemicals, hazardous substances and oils on the environment.

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Civil Penalty

San Francisco will pay a total penalty of $250,000 to resolve its alleged liability for CWA and RCRA violations, of which $227,000 will be paid to the Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund for CWA Section 311 discharge and SPCC violations. The remaining $23,000 will be paid to the U.S. Treasury for CWA pretreatment and RCRA violations.

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Comment Period

The proposed settlement, lodged in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California, is subject to a 30-day public comment period and final court approval. Information on submitting comment is available at the Department of Justice website.

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For additional information, contact:

Cheryl Rose
Senior Attorney
Water Enforcement Division
Office of Civil Enforcement – OECA
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (2242A)
1200 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W.
(202) 564-4136

Message From Our Corporate Coffee Overlords: We Own the Sidewalk at 225 Bush Street, More or Less

Monday, September 23rd, 2013

 As was foretold, the newly-approved bench and table and chairs at 225 Bush are kind of a mess. What’s the point in having a super wide sidewalk in the 94104 Financh if there’s going to be a bottleneck betwixt a giant 17 foot tall ad (a former newspaper kiosk long since closed down) and all this?

Check it:

I cry foul.

Actually, I didn’t cry foul afore the deadline to do so passed by in June 2013. As I’m not a NIMBY. And now that we can see the bench but also the table and the chairs, we can see that all this stuff takes up too much space and leaves like three feet of space for the peds to squeeze by.

Even Coffee Culture lovers / customers were appalled by these cheesy plastic chairs when they first appeared.

IDK, maybe this sitch has fixed itself the past few weeks, but this system of having a trial and putting up a sign for people to complain to SFGov doesn’t work if corporations do a bait and switch deal with the layout.

Again, I cry foul.

Oh, and speaking of corporations:

Here’s coffee dude’s website, srsly.

Dude, do you think you leased the sidewalk too?

Approve not I do.

The Crowded Sidewalks of Bush Street: Is There Room for Chairs Betwixt “Curry Up Now” and “Coffee Cultures?”

Wednesday, July 3rd, 2013

Uh, no, there’s not.


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Ah, here’s a quieter time between the most popular food truck in the bay area and the new cawfee shawp inside of the Standard Oil Building at 225 Bush:

Now I’ll tell you, I couldn’t care less* about this issue, but you? You have a lot of time on your hands…

If I were in charge, I’d probably say thumbs down on the street furniture, but I’d allow them some signage.

Of course, I’m not in charge and, as stated, I don’t care.

Super don’t care.

As always, I’ll find a way** to navigate the Streets of San Francisco regardless.


*Obviously, things are going to be a bit crowded at lunchtime, ’cause that curry truck is uber popular. OTOH, passersby might not ever realize that’s there’s a new upscale coffee place there unless they see people hanging about sipping away. (This reminds me of parklets, which some business owners think they own because the process for getting one is so costly.) 

**But I don’t use a wheelchair…