Posts Tagged ‘map’

At Long Last, a Map That Clearly Shows That Part of San Francisco is in the East Bay on Alameda Island

Thursday, January 30th, 2014

O you can say that this map is wrong, but you can’t say that you don’t get the point, which is that that left piece of Alameda you can see on the wrong side of the line is part of the City and County of San Francisco:

Click to expand

I should go visit sometime…

Carry on.

Remembering the Time When San Francisco’s Official Tourist Association Renamed the Tenderloin as the “THEATER DISTRICT”

Thursday, January 23rd, 2014

This one’s from a few years back:

Click to expand

Perhaps this was the problem:

Organization History

For more than 100 years the San Francisco Travel Association has worked on behalf of its partners to promote San Francisco as the destination of choice for conventions and leisure travel. The Association is an outgrowth of the San Francisco Convention and Tourist League, a non-profit, local business association founded in 1909 to reclaim the City’s position as a world-class destination in the wake of the devastating 1906 earthquake and fire.

San Francisco Travel continues that mission today, aggressively marketing and selling San Francisco to attract visitors. San Francisco Travel is a private, not-for-profit, 501(c)6 membership organization, headed by a Board of Directors made up of 45 business leaders from various companies, elected by the membership. Additionally, in 2003, the Association established a 501(c)3 foundation to raise scholarship funds for students enrolled in local hospitality management programs and to produce educational programs.” 

Official Yelp Map of San Francisco’s “Sketchy” Areas: Now with Annotations! – Bad News for NeMA Building

Friday, January 17th, 2014

Check it, “Reviews that mention ‘SKETCHY’ in San Francisco

Click to expand

(Now of course there are plenty of other places in town that could similarly be considered “sketchy” by the Yelpers, except the Yelpers would never have a reason to go there.)

Now let’s take a look at these blips on San Francisco’s CT scan:

North Beach – Stay off of Broadway and out of its strip clubs and you should do fine. The epicenter is Kearney and Broadway.

The Tenderloin – This is the big one. AKA the Uptown Tenderloin, per some Berkeley residents. AKA the Twitterloin. AKA the 6th Street Corridor. AKA Downtown. AKA Civic Center. AKA New Market / NeMA. AKA Central Market. AKA Mid-Market. AKA the ‘Loin. The epicenter is Turk and Taylor.

The Fillmore – AKA the Western Addition. The epicenter is the Popeye’s Chicken & Biscuits in the Safeway mall.

NoPA – AKA North of Panhandle Area. AKA Northeast of the Panhandle Area. AKA the Divisadero Corridor. AKA DivCo. AKA the Western Addition. The epicenter is the Popeye’s Chicken & Biscuits at Hayes, I suppose, but the drug dealers who hang out at McAllister and Divis might disagree.

Lower Haight – AKA Lower Fillmore. The epicenter is Haight and Webster.

16th and Mission – The epicenter is the BART Station.

24th and Mission – The epicenter is the BART Station.

30th and Mission – The epicenter is where they want to build a new BART Station.

The Lower Third – NB: The cross-streets are alphabetized, more or less. The epicenter is Oakdale and Third

END OF LINE.

Oh Boy, “Civic Center Community Benefits District” “Community Ambassadors” Look Like They’re in a Bob Fosse Dance Routine

Wednesday, August 7th, 2013

I think it’s the hat what does it.

Let’s see here, what does the CCCBD do with the tax* money levied on local bidness and institutions?

Oh look, it’s a Community Ambassador narcing to the SFPD:

Boy, I’ll bet the local street toughs will never ever notice this kind of thing:

Let’s see, what else. Oh look, it’s Our Dear Leader at some North Korean-style photo op posted on the CCCBD FB.

And check it, the map of so-called Civic Center is a perfect giant arrow pointed down. How apropo! Did corrupt non-profit “leader” Randy Shaw play a role in drawing the borders of this district as well? We can only hope.

Someday I’ll tell you, Gentle Reader, all about the now-defunct Fillmore CBD, Ooh, about a quarter of the taxes were spent on just one person to show up at meetings to say how great the FCBD was.

But here’s the Party Line, Dear Comrade, from the all-seeing and all-knowing SFGov. See how that works? No problems here!

In closing, I’d just like to say “hi” to area Vanity Google Searcher and Mayoral Spokesmodel Christine Falvey. (Someday, someday, I’ll get a kickback job what pays me six figures to Google my very own name all the live-long day. Someday, someday, Dominion

All the deets: 

The Civic Center Community Benefit District (CBD) is a special assessment district conceived and organized by a group of concerned Civic Center property owners, arts organizations, government entities, and other stakeholders. The goal of the CBD is to improve coordination and communication around the management, image, safety, beautification and cleanliness of the greater Civic Center area for the benefit of patrons, residents, employees, merchants, property owners and other visitors within the district.

*If you want to get technical and say that the charges assessed aren’t actually taxes, well then go ahead. But, fundamentally, they’re taxes.

This Map Shows the Results of the “Mid-Market Renaissance” – “Crime Reports as Block Height in San Francisco”

Thursday, July 11th, 2013

Via Bluoz, and from right here, a reported crime map of San Francisco.

Crime Reports as Block Height in San Francisco:

Click to expand

You can see the flat spots on the left there – Golden Gate Park and The Presidio.

Of course the high-rise blocks are features of Randy Shaw‘s corrupt Twitterloin, aka the Mid-Market area, aka NeMa (“New Market”), aka The Tenderloin, aka The Yammerloin, aka The “Uptown” Tenderloin, aka Skid Row, aka Sixth Street, aka Lower Nob Hill, aka “Downtown.”

Oh Harsh: Yelp’s Official “Sketchy” San Francisco Map – The Greater Tender- Yammer- Twitter- Loin Featured

Tuesday, July 2nd, 2013

Via Bluoz comes the news of Yelp’s official “sketchy” areas map.

Click to expand

Oh NEMA [New Market], will you ever win?

Bus Rapid Transit: Our San Francisco County Transit Authority Studies Big-Ass, 80-Foot “Bi-Articulated” Buses

Friday, May 24th, 2013

Here’s your San Francisco County Transit Authoritah in a nutshell:

“Created in 1989, the Authority is responsible for long-range transportation planning for the city, and it analyzes, designs and funds improvements for San Francisco’s roadway and public transportation networks.”

Well, the SFCTA is on the move in 2013, doing stuff like making new webpages, and, among other things, looking at Bus Rapid Transit for the 415.

So that means studying, like er mah Gah, monstrous buses like these rigs straight outta Mexico City: 

Click to expand

Now, would BRT be a good thing for those poor souls living out in the West Bay taking the wretched #38 Geary home every night? IDK. I’ll look into it.

Transit Porn: The Newest Govmint Website is “MyStreetSF.Com” – SFCTA Shows Where It’s Spending All Your Money

Monday, May 20th, 2013

That’s what they’re calling it, MyStreetSF.Com, but all that URL does now is point you to http://www.sfcta.org/mystreetsf-map, which is also new.

Check it, SFCTA is EV ERYWHERE:

Click to expand

This image is just a snapshot. What you should do is click on over and then start tapping on the interactive map.

[Call and response, like when you were an activist before you became a typical selfish millionaire property-owning NIMBY-type] Whose streets? _MY_ STREETS!

Now you’re on the trolley. In fact, you’re paying for one, right…here. See?

All the deets:

[Click on this link to go directly to the MyStreetSF Projects Map.]

From signals to streetcars, bicycles to boulevards, from pedestrian safety to paving, the San Francisco County Transportation Authority (SFCTA) provides funding for hundreds of transportation projects citywide. The MyStreetSF interactive map shows all projects currently underway that are funded by, or prioritized for funding by the SFCTA, as well as those for which the SFCTA provides some level of oversight, in our role as Congestion Management Agency for San Francisco.

Most of these projects are funded with Prop K sales tax funds matching other federal, state, or regional funds. We also provide funding through the Prop AA Vehicle Registration Fee and the Transportation Fund for Clean Air  programs.

The MyStreetSF interactive map allows you to search for projects by location, Supervisorial District, project type (e.g., bicycle, pedestrian safety, transit rehabilitation), project sponsor, or timeline. Click on a project on the map to see key information (e.g., short description, schedule, cost) and a link to the project page and/or project sponsor’s main page. The map page also includes information on city-wide projects and programs like Bicycle Education and Outreach.

We’re still beta testing the map and continue to work on new features, such as displaying already-completed projects.

Please let us know what you think. Your comments are invaluable in helping us correct, refine, and improve the map.

Disclaimer This map only shows transportation projects funded or prioritized for funding by the SFCTA, as well as those for which SFCTA is responsible for some level of oversight, acting in its capacity as Congestion Management Agency for San Francisco. SFCTA does not guarantee the accuracy or completeness of the information shown on the map.

Three Things You Don’t Know About the Bay to Breakers

Monday, May 20th, 2013

1.  THE TOP OF HAYES STREET HILL _ISN’T_ THE HIGHEST POINT OF THE BTOB FUN-RUN. JUST CHECK THE ROUTE PROFILE:

“Here’s your route profile, starting from the SoMA near the bay going all the way to the breakers of Ocean Beach. See that big incline just before mile marker three? That’s the vaunted Hayes Street Hill. (And actually, the highest part of Hayes Street on this part of the course is near Pierce, not “at Fillmore and Steiner“ and not ”between Fillmore and Sutter.”)

And actually, that part of Hayes peaks at around 260 feet, not 215:

Now, here’s your winner. It’s the 270-something foot high saddle on JFK Jr. Drive betwixt Prayer Book Cross and Stow Lake / Strawberry Hill, where ”Kennedy” is written:

2. THE BTOB FUN-RUN IS A 12K, AND YET IT’S NOT A 12K – THE CLAIMED “WORLD RECORDS” ARE NOT, IN FACT, WORLD RECORDS

“Race organizers and media have reported that the course records set by Sammy Kitwara in 2009 and Lineth Chepkurui in 2010 are also world records at the 12 km distance;[31] however, the International Association of Athletics Federations, the international governing body for the sport of athletics/track and field, does not recognize world records or world bests in either an indoor or outdoor 12 km.[32] The Association of Road Racing Statisticians, a non-regulatory group that collects road running data, does recognize world records in the outdoor 12 km provided that the race course meets certain criteria.[33][34] In order to rule-out the possibility of wind assistancein point-to-point courses, the ARRS stipulates that the course must have “not more than 30% of the race distance separation between that start and finish”, or 3.6 km for a 12 km race.[34] Given that the Bay to Breakers is run on a point-to-point course in which the start and finish of the event are approximately 10.5 linear kilometers apart, the ARRS recognizes two other marks as 12 km world records: Kenyan Simon Kigen‘s 33:46 in Portland, Oregon on May 19, 1985 and Chepkurui’s 38:10 at the 2010Lilac Bloomsday Run.[33][nb 2]

3. MOST PEOPLE _DON’T_ PAY THE ABSURDLY HIGH REGISTRATION FEE. MOST PEOPLE YOU SEE ARE “BANDITS”

HERE’S THE OFFICIAL ESTIMATE: “…more than in the hundreds but less than tens of thousands.” THE REAL NUMBER IS TENS OF THOUSANDS.

“The Bay to Breakers is known for the large number of unregistered runners, or “bandits”, who participate in the race. Ross Mirkarimi, a member of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors, reported that over half of the 60,000 participants in the 2010 Bay to Breakers were unregistered.[19] San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom was among the runners in 2010 who did not pay the registration fee to obtain a race number.[19][22] Registered participation was 24,430 in 2010,[23] 43,954 in 2011,[24] 23,072 for 2012,[25], and approximately 20,000 for 2013.[26]